Recent Advances and Clinical Outcomes of Endometriosis

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Obstetrics & Gynecology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 3537

Special Issue Editors

Gynecology, Obstetrics, Gynecological Oncology, Bethesda Hospital, 47053 Duisburg, Germany
Interests: deep endometriosis; adenomyosis; pelvic retroperitoneal surgery; transvaginal ultrasound; robotic surgery; laparo-scopic surgery; hysteroscopic surgery; endometrial cancer; cervical cancer; ovarian cancer
Univ Clin Gynecol, Carl Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Pius Hosp, D-26121 Oldenburg, Germany
Interests: reproductive surgery; oncological surgery; minimal-access surgery; endometriosis surgery; gynecological surgery
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Thanks to important advances in ultrasound and MR imaging, the diagnostic approach to endometriosis has shifted from diagnostic laparoscopy to a complete pre-therapeutical staging and classification of the extent of the disease. This allows for a more tailored medical and surgical strategy. New surgical techniques including robotics guarantee more precise and tissue-sparing resections of endometriosis lesions with improved results and less complications. New medical treatment options like GnRH antagonist combination therapies offer promising outcomes. Additionally, a targeted therapy based on molecular profiling of the disease is looking to become a reality over the next few years as different international working groups move closer to understanding the phenotypes and genetics behind endometriosis. The new pace in endometriosis science has been made possible by increased awareness and national endometriosis strategies. The coming decade will bring an increasing number of relevant advances and thus more favorable outcomes. This Special Issue aims to focus on these novel advancements in all aspects of endometriosis and adenomyosis, showing the dynamic of the recent development and giving an overview on advances and perspectives.

Prof. Dr. Harald Krentel
Prof. Dr. Rudy Leon De Wilde
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • phenotypes
  • genetics
  • mRNA
  • robotic surgery
  • MR imaging
  • transvaginal ultrasound
  • deep endometriosis
  • GnRH antagonists
  • ICG
  • adhesions in endometriosis
  • infertility
  • adenomyosis and obstetrics
  • classification systems
  • microbiome
  • sexuality and endometriosis

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

16 pages, 3397 KiB  
Article
Diaphragmatic Endometriosis—A Single-Center Retrospective Analysis of the Patients’ Demographics, Symptomatology, and Long-Term Treatment Outcomes
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(20), 6455; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12206455 - 11 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2877
Abstract
Diaphragmatic endometriosis is rare and forms 0.67–4.7% of all endometriosis cases. Evidence regarding its optimal management is lacking. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed the patient characteristics and long-term treatment outcomes of diaphragmatic endometriosis patients. Over a 4-year period, 23 patients were diagnosed [...] Read more.
Diaphragmatic endometriosis is rare and forms 0.67–4.7% of all endometriosis cases. Evidence regarding its optimal management is lacking. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed the patient characteristics and long-term treatment outcomes of diaphragmatic endometriosis patients. Over a 4-year period, 23 patients were diagnosed with diaphragmatic endometriosis. The majority of patients had coexisting deep pelvic endometriosis. Cyclic upper abdominal pain was reported by 60.9% of patients, while cyclic chest and shoulder pain were reported by 43.5% and 34.8% of patients, respectively. Most patients were treated with laparoscopic lesion ablation, while 21.1% were treated with minimally invasive excision. The mean follow-up time was 23.7 months. Long-lasting resolution of the chest, abdominal, and shoulder pain occurred in 50%, 35.7%, and 25% of patients, respectively. Nonetheless, 78.9% of patients reported major improvement in their symptoms postoperatively. Significantly higher rates of postoperative shoulder, abdominal, and chest pain were observed in patients who received postoperative hormonal therapy compared with those who did not. All patients treated expectantly remained stable. Therefore, we recommend treating diaphragmatic endometriosis only in symptomatic patients. The risk of incomplete surgery should be minimized by a multidisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic approach with a careful assessment of the diaphragm and the thoracic cavity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances and Clinical Outcomes of Endometriosis)
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