Smart Mobility: Advancements and Innovations in Intelligent Transportation Systems

A special issue of Infrastructures (ISSN 2412-3811).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 4229

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Engineering of the University of Porto, Research Centre for Territory, Transports and Environment, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
Interests: transport and health; road safety; econometrics; transport engineering and management; transport analysis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
Interests: data science; interaction design; service design; intelligent transport systems; logistics; sustainable mobility
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Smart mobility is transforming the way we move and interact with transportation systems. This Special Issue on smart mobility is dedicated to exploring the remarkable advancements and innovations in the dominion of intelligent transportation systems (ITS). This an era of unprecedented urbanization and technological progress urges the need for more efficient, sustainable, and intelligent transport systems.

This Special Issue serves as a catalyst for knowledge exchange and collaboration among leading researchers, practitioners, and policymakers in the field of smart mobility. By researching the latest developments and breakthroughs, we aim to shed light on the transformative potential of intelligent transportation systems, showcasing their ability to revolutionize the way we move and interact within our urban environments.

With an emphasis on cutting-edge advancements, this Special Issue explores the convergence of emerging technologies, such as artificial intelligence, big data analytics, Internet of Things, and connectivity solutions. These powerful tools provide the foundation for building intelligent transportation systems that optimize traffic flows, enhance safety, reduce environmental impact, and improve the overall quality of life for individuals and communities.

We invite you to contribute to this exploration of the world of smart mobility. By joining forces and fostering interdisciplinary collaboration, we have the opportunity to shape the future of transportation and create sustainable, efficient, and inclusive mobility ecosystems.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Intelligent and resilient infrastructure;
  • Connected and autonomous vehicles;
  • Predictive traffic management;
  • Multimodal transportation;
  • Smart logistics;
  • User-centric mobility services;
  • On-demand ride-sharing services;
  • Innovative use of data and machine learning in smart mobility;
  • Inclusive, intelligent and sustainable mobility;
  • Innovative business models;
  • First and last mile innovations in passenger and freight transport.

Prof. Dr. António Couto
Dr. Marta Campos Ferreira
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Infrastructures is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • IoT and smart infrastructure
  • autonomous vehicles
  • mobility as a service (MaaS)
  • shared mobility
  • intelligent transportation systems (ITS)
  • connected vehicles
  • big data analytics
  • micro-mobility
  • digitalization in mobility
  • artificial intelligence in mobility
  • user-focused and inclusive mobility

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

26 pages, 9312 KiB  
Article
The Road Network Design Problem for the Deployment of Automated Vehicles (RNDP-AVs): A Nonlinear Programming Mathematical Model
by Lígia Conceição, Gonçalo Homem de Almeida Correia, Bart van Arem and José Pedro Tavares
Infrastructures 2024, 9(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures9010012 - 10 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1794
Abstract
Once trusted, automated vehicles (AVs) will gradually appear in urban areas. Such a transition is an opportunity in transport planning to control undesired impacts and possibly mitigate congestion at a time when both conventional vehicles (CVs) and AVs coexist. This paper deals with [...] Read more.
Once trusted, automated vehicles (AVs) will gradually appear in urban areas. Such a transition is an opportunity in transport planning to control undesired impacts and possibly mitigate congestion at a time when both conventional vehicles (CVs) and AVs coexist. This paper deals with the complex transport decision problem of designing part of the network that is exclusive for AVs through a nonlinear programming model. The objective function minimises the costs of travel times where vehicles circulate under user equilibrium. The model evaluates the benefits of having an AVs-dedicated infrastructure and the associated costs from the detouring of CVs. Three planning strategies are explored: incremental, long-term and hybrid planning. The first creates a subnetwork evolving incrementally over time. The second reversely designs a subnetwork from the optimal solution obtained at a ratio of 90% AVs. The third limits the incremental planning towards that optimal long-term solution. The model is applied to the city of Delft, in the Netherlands. Two scenarios are analysed, with and without AV-dedicated roads, at several AV penetration rates. We find that implementing dedicated roads for AVs reduces the overall costs and congestion up to 16%. However, CV detouring is inevitable at later network stages, increasing the total distance travelled (up to 8%) and congestion in the surroundings of AV subnetworks. Concerning the planning strategies, incremental planning is appropriate for starting in the initial stages and is the strategy that most tackles CV detouring. The hybrid or the long-term strategies are more suitable to be applied after a ratio of 50% AVs, and the hybrid planning is the strategy that most reduces delay. Full article
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15 pages, 4927 KiB  
Article
Electrification of Transport Service Applied to Massawa–Asmara
by Cristian Giovanni Colombo, Alessandro Saldarini, Michela Longo, Wahiba Yaici, Fabio Borghetti and Morris Brenna
Infrastructures 2023, 8(8), 121; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures8080121 - 01 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1330
Abstract
Considering the proposed strict new constraints of public authorities, decarbonization has become a key trend in recent years. Although several countries have started the process of decarbonization through the introduction of electric vehicles in their public services, for many countries, especially developing countries, [...] Read more.
Considering the proposed strict new constraints of public authorities, decarbonization has become a key trend in recent years. Although several countries have started the process of decarbonization through the introduction of electric vehicles in their public services, for many countries, especially developing countries, transportation is still a hard sector to decarbonize. The presence of obsolete and polluting vehicles discourages citizens from using public transport and thus incentivizes the use of private vehicles, which create traffic congestion and increase emissions. Based on these considerations, this paper aimed to implement a simulation for a public service in Eritrea, evaluating whether it is possible to take a long trip using an electric minibus. A case study is implemented highlighting the barriers of electrifying transportation in this area, producing results on fuel consumption and service reliability. In the case study, four scenarios are presented to estimate the service. The scenarios evaluate the possibility to perform from three to five recharges. Fewer charges mean longer charging time, leading to a 2 h charging phase in Scenario 1, while recharging more than twice along the route will lead to shorter 30 min charges, as in Scenario 3. The case study also highlights the relevance of the slope in electric vehicle performance, as reported for the case of Asmara–Massawa travel (Econs= 6.688 kWh). Finally, an environmentally sustainable solution, such as a 92 kWh/day photovoltaic plant, is proposed to power the service. Full article
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