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Diet and Lifestyle: Impact on the Molecular and Cellular Mechanism of NCDs

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Endocrinology and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2024) | Viewed by 6338

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
CREA—Research Centre for Food and Nutrition, 00178 Rome, Italy
Interests: nutritional status; energy metabolism; energy requirements; physical activity; body composition; obesity; anorexia nervosa; elderly
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The dramatic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic could represent an opportunity to rethink the social and economic development model between individuals and the community and between humanity and the planet. Regarding the health sector, the pandemic highlighted the "double burden of disease", i.e., the growth of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) alongside acute ones not being sufficient enough to explain epidemiological risks. A tripled or quadrupled disease burden has been witnessed, due to the resurgence of viral diseases—COVID-19 being the current example—and the overlap between infectious diseases and NCDs underlying many deaths from new coronaviruses, not only among the elderly and chronically ill, but also in other age groups and people with polymorbidities. This Special Issue focuses on collecting review and original research articles, communications, and commentaries aimed at evaluating the effects of behavioural risk factors and social–environmental factors on the molecular and cellular mechanism of NCDs. The key to counteracting or reducing NCDs’ impacts is to emphasize correct and adequate dietary patterns and lifestyle modifications, including weight loss, regular exercises, and a good sleep hygiene. Topics include, but are not limited to, biochemical nutritional biomarkers, the impact of physical activity on the musculoskeletal system and bone–muscle crosstalk, as well as specific chronic inflammation-mediated diseases.

Lastly, IJMS is a journal related to molecular sciences; therefore, we would prefer to publish papers focusing on molecular aspects.

Dr. Elena Azzini
Dr. Angela Polito
Dr. Valeria Gasperi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • lifestyle
  • diet
  • NCDs
  • nutrition
  • molecular and cellular Mechanism
  • behavioural risk factors
  • social–environmental factors
  • biochemical nutritional biomarkers

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 1029 KiB  
Article
Total and Plant Protein Consumption: The Role of Inflammation and Risk of Non-Communicable Disease
by Elena Azzini, Ilaria Peluso, Federica Intorre, Lorenzo Barnaba, Eugenia Venneria, Maria Stella Foddai, Donatella Ciarapica, Francesca Maiani, Anna Raguzzini and Angela Polito
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(14), 8008; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23148008 - 20 Jul 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1763
Abstract
Background: Inflammatory cytokine levels are associated with Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) and can be influenced by a person’s macronutrient profile. This work aims to evaluate the relationship between the compliance with the age-specific recommended protein intake and the levels of inflammatory markers related to [...] Read more.
Background: Inflammatory cytokine levels are associated with Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) and can be influenced by a person’s macronutrient profile. This work aims to evaluate the relationship between the compliance with the age-specific recommended protein intake and the levels of inflammatory markers related to the risk of NCDs. Methods: The study participants included 347 participants (119 men and 228 women), ages 18 to 86 years. Cardio-metabolic risk evaluations, including an assessment of the prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome, were performed. Leptin, IL-15, IL-6, and TNF-α levels were measured. Results: The adequacy of the total protein (TP) intake was lower in old people compared to individuals aged <60 years, and only few volunteers consumed the suggested 50% plant protein (PP) for a healthy and sustainable diet. A lower risk of NCDs with a PP consumption above at least 40% was observed only in old individuals. A differential effect on TNF-α and IL-6 was observed for both TP and PP intake by gender and age class, whereas for leptin and IL-15 only significant interactions among sex and the class of age were found. Conclusion: Although our data suggest that consuming more than 40% of PP can reduce the risk of NCDs, the effect of gender differences on cytokine levels should be considered in larger studies. Full article
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11 pages, 2335 KiB  
Article
Soybean Meal-Dependent Acute Intestinal Inflammation Delays Osteogenesis in Zebrafish Larvae
by Marta Carnovali, Giuseppe Banfi, Giovanni Porta and Massimo Mariotti
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(13), 7480; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23137480 - 05 Jul 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1933
Abstract
Foods are known to be modulators of inflammation and skeletal development. The intestine plays an essential role in the regulation of bone health mainly through the regulation of the absorption of vitamin D and calcium; in fact, inflammatory bowel diseases are often related [...] Read more.
Foods are known to be modulators of inflammation and skeletal development. The intestine plays an essential role in the regulation of bone health mainly through the regulation of the absorption of vitamin D and calcium; in fact, inflammatory bowel diseases are often related to bone health issues such as low bone mineral density, high fracture risk, osteoporosis and osteopenia. Considering the complexity of the pathways involved, the use of a simple animal model can be highly useful to better elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms. Soybean flour with a high saponin content has been used in many studies to induce intestinal inflammation in zebrafish larvae. Using a 50% soybean meal (SBM), we analyzed the effects of this soy-induced inflammatory bowel disease on zebrafish larval osteogenesis. Soybean meal induces intestinal functional alterations and an inflammatory state, highlighted by neutral red staining, without altering the general development of the larvae. Our data show that the chondrogenesis as well as endochondral ossification of the head of zebrafish larvae are not affected by an SBM-diet, whereas intramembranous ossification was delayed both in the head, where the length of the ethmoid plate reduced by 17%, and in the trunk with a delayed vertebral mineralization of 47% of SBM larvae. These data highlight that diet-dependent bowel inflammation can differently modulate the different mechanisms of bone development in different zones of the skeleton of zebrafish larvae. Full article
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14 pages, 4912 KiB  
Article
Bisdemethoxycurcumin Attenuated Renal Injury via Activation of Keap1/Nrf2 Pathway in High-Fat Diet-Fed Mice
by Xiaoqin Ding, Yan Chen, Lina Zhou, Ruoyun Wu, Tunyu Jian, Han Lyu, Yan Liu and Jian Chen
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(13), 7395; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23137395 - 02 Jul 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1842
Abstract
Bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC), a principal and active component of edible turmeric, was previously found to have beneficial effects on metabolic diseases. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) may benefit from its potential therapeutic use. Using a high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mouse model, we examined the effects of [...] Read more.
Bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC), a principal and active component of edible turmeric, was previously found to have beneficial effects on metabolic diseases. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) may benefit from its potential therapeutic use. Using a high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mouse model, we examined the effects of BDMC on renal injury and tried to determine how its associated mechanism works. A number of metabolic disorders are significantly improved by BDMC, including obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia and inflammation. Further research on renal histopathology and function showed that BDMC could repair renal pathological changes and enhance renal function. Moreover, decreased serum malondialdehyde (MDA), elevated superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and the inhibition of renal reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction revealed the alleviation of oxidative stress after BDMC administration. In addition, renal Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1/nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Keap1/Nrf2) pathway was activated in BDMC-treated mice. In conclusion, these findings demonstrated BDMC as a potential therapy for HFD-induced CKD via the activation of the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway. Full article
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