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Research Progress on 3D Cultures for Modeling the Microenvironment

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2024) | Viewed by 687

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy and Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, 04100 Latina, Italy
Interests: cardiac microenvironment; cardiac repair mechanisms; 3D culture
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Methods and protocols for creating 3D cultures in vitro have been rapidly evolving in recent years, involving both biomaterials and structure design. Creating a 3D microenvironment for cell cultures allows complex interactions and stimuli that are functional for efficient phenotypic control and for mimicking tissue homeostasis and pathology. These tools can be used to successfully generate artificial tissues or cellular organoids that could be used for modeling the microenvironment in a physiologically relevant way, in addition to being used for drug screening or exploiting tissue engineering strategies in the clinical translation of regenerative medicine approaches.

This Special Issue will bring together scholars in the field of 3D cultures for the creation of in vitro microenvironments for the study of tissue homeostasis and pathology, particularly in the field of cardiovascular research. Potential topics include, but are not limited to, the following: novel methods for creating 3D cultures and tissue patches; study of the microenvironment in 3D cultures; modeling human diseases or pathological conditions in vitro; tissue engineering for regenerative medicine purposes; stem cell differentiation in 3D cultures; bioprinting of artificial tissues; development of smart biomaterials; and cell–extracellular matrix interactions in the context of 3D tissue development and function.

Dr. Isotta Chimenti
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Keywords

  • 3D culture
  • tissue engineering
  • microenvironment
  • disease modeling
  • stem cell differentiation
  • regenerative medicine
  • biomaterials
  • cell–extracellular matrix interaction

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

19 pages, 4634 KiB  
Article
Development of a Static Avascular and Dynamic Vascular Human Skin Equivalent Employing Collagen/Keratin Hydrogels
by Kameel Zuniga, Neda Ghousifam, Lucy Shaffer, Sean Brocklehurst, Mark Van Dyke, Robert Christy, Shanmugasundaram Natesan and Marissa Nichole Rylander
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(9), 4992; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25094992 - 3 May 2024
Viewed by 486
Abstract
One of the primary complications in generating physiologically representative skin tissue is the inability to integrate vasculature into the system, which has been shown to promote the proliferation of basal keratinocytes and consequent keratinocyte differentiation, and is necessary for mimicking representative barrier function [...] Read more.
One of the primary complications in generating physiologically representative skin tissue is the inability to integrate vasculature into the system, which has been shown to promote the proliferation of basal keratinocytes and consequent keratinocyte differentiation, and is necessary for mimicking representative barrier function in the skin and physiological transport properties. We created a 3D vascularized human skin equivalent (VHSE) with a dermal and epidermal layer, and compared keratinocyte differentiation (immunomarker staining), epidermal thickness (H&E staining), and barrier function (transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and dextran permeability) to a static, organotypic avascular HSE (AHSE). The VHSE had a significantly thicker epidermal layer and increased resistance, both an indication of increased barrier function, compared to the AHSE. The inclusion of keratin in our collagen hydrogel extracellular matrix (ECM) increased keratinocyte differentiation and barrier function, indicated by greater resistance and decreased permeability. Surprisingly, however, endothelial cells grown in a collagen/keratin extracellular environment showed increased cell growth and decreased vascular permeability, indicating a more confluent and tighter vessel compared to those grown in a pure collagen environment. The development of a novel VHSE, which incorporated physiological vasculature and a unique collagen/keratin ECM, improved barrier function, vessel development, and skin structure compared to a static AHSE model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research Progress on 3D Cultures for Modeling the Microenvironment)
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