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Beyond Antioxidants and Analgesics: From Natural Compounds to Synthetic Derivatives

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioactives and Nutraceuticals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 June 2024 | Viewed by 961

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Siena, Via Aldo Moro 2, 53100 Siena, Italy
Interests: organic synthesis of bio-inspired molecules; small libraries of compounds; design and synthesis of new small molecules and/or modification/hybridization of natural compounds
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Molecular and Developmental Medicine, University of Siena, Via Aldo Moro 2, 53100 Siena, Italy
Interests: the biological effects of natural bioactive compounds; antinflammatory; antioxidant; analgesic and wound healing properties; hypoxia and oxidative stress
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce the new Special Issue entitled "Beyond Antioxidants and Analgesics: From Natural Compounds to Synthetic Derivatives". The topics covered are of high research interest. In fact, oxidative and inflammatory processes are the basis of serious and disabling pathologies, such as headache, cardiovascular disease, arthritis, and neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, the development of new molecules and the identification of natural compounds, endowed with antioxidant/anti-inflammatory activity and capable of blocking their harmful effects and/or the painful state often generated, are required.

This Special Issue aims to cover aspects on either isolated natural or synthetic compounds, as well as semi-synthetic derivatives, with applications in cellular functions in physiology and disease, which could potentially be exploited for the development of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic agents. Contributions to this Special Issue may be original research or review articles or short communications on any type of health topic and diseases related to biological targets.

Prof. Dr. Antonella Brizzi
Prof. Dr. Federica Pessina
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pain
  • oxidative stress
  • inflammation
  • bioactive compounds
  • antioxidant

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

19 pages, 7924 KiB  
Article
Paclitaxel-Associated Mechanical Sensitivity and Neuroinflammation Are Sex-, Time-, and Site-Specific and Prevented through Cannabigerol Administration in C57Bl/6 Mice
by Hongbo Li and Sara Jane Ward
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(8), 4277; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25084277 - 12 Apr 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 619
Abstract
Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is one of the most prevalent and dose-limiting complications in chemotherapy patients. One identified mechanism underlying CIPN is neuroinflammation. Most of this research has been conducted in only male or female rodent models, making direct comparisons regarding the role [...] Read more.
Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is one of the most prevalent and dose-limiting complications in chemotherapy patients. One identified mechanism underlying CIPN is neuroinflammation. Most of this research has been conducted in only male or female rodent models, making direct comparisons regarding the role of sex differences in the neuroimmune underpinnings of CIPN limited. Moreover, most measurements have focused on the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and/or spinal cord, while relatively few studies have been aimed at characterizing neuroinflammation in the brain, for example the periaqueductal grey (PAG). The overall goals of the present study were to determine (1) paclitaxel-associated changes in markers of inflammation in the PAG and DRG in male and female C57Bl6 mice and (2) determine the effect of prophylactic administration of an anti-inflammatory cannabinoid, cannabigerol (CBG). In Experiment 1, male and female mice were treated with paclitaxel (8–32 mg/kg/injection, Days 1, 3, 5, and 7) and mechanical sensitivity was measured using Von Frey filaments on Day 7 (Cohort 1) and Day 14 (Cohort 2). Cohorts were euthanized on Day 8 or 15, respectively, and DRG and PAG were harvested for qPCR analysis of the gene expression of markers of pain and inflammation Aig1, Gfap, Ccl2, Cxcl9, Tlr4, Il6, and Calca. In Experiment 2, male and female mice were treated with vehicle or 10 mg/kg CBG i.p. 30 min prior to each paclitaxel injection. Mechanical sensitivity was measured on Day 14. Mice were euthanized on Day 15, and PAG were harvested for qPCR analysis of the gene expression of Aig1, Gfap, Ccl2, Cxcl9, Tlr4, Il6, and Calca. Paclitaxel produced a transient increase in potency to produce mechanical sensitivity in male versus female mice. Regarding neuroinflammation, more gene expression changes were apparent earlier in the DRG and at a later time point in the PAG. Also, more changes were observed in females in the PAG than males. Overall, sex differences were observed for most markers at both time points and regions. Importantly, in both the DRG and PAG, most increases in markers of neuroinflammation and pain occurred at paclitaxel doses higher than those associated with significant changes in the mechanical threshold. Two analytes that demonstrated the most compelling sexual dimorphism and that changed more in males were Cxcl9 and Ccl2, and Tlr4 in females. Lastly, prophylactic administration of CBG protected the male and female mice from increased mechanical sensitivity and female mice from neuroinflammation in the PAG. Future studies are warranted to explore how these sex differences may shed light on the mechanisms of CIPN and how non-psychoactive cannabinoids such as CBG may engage these targets to prevent or attenuate the effects of paclitaxel and other chemotherapeutic agents on the nervous system. Full article
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