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Healthy-Pathological Microbiome with Particular Regard to Anaerobic Bacteria

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2023) | Viewed by 2091

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Institute of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Pécs Medical School, Pécs, Hungary
2. Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Pécs Medical School, Pécs, Hungary
Interests: clinical microbiology; anaerobes; oral microbiology; epidemiology; Actinomyces spp.; Bacteroides spp.; Clostridium difficile; MALDI-TOF MS; molecular biology; medicine
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Guest Editor
Department of Oral Biology and Experimental Dental Research, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Szeged, 6720 Szeged, Hungary
Interests: antimicrobial resistance; antimicrobial stewardship; knowledge-attitude-practice (KAP); questionnaires; epidemiology; public health; bacteriology; novel antimicrobials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Strict anaerobic bacteria are important constitutents of the normal human microbiota and they have been implicated in a wide range of infectious processes, that may be serious or life-threatening. The isolation and correct identification of these bacteria may still be challenging in many settings worldwide, due to their laborious culture, extensive laboratory requirements (suitable anaerobiosis) and the fastidious nature of these microorganisms. Susceptibility testing for anerobic bacteria is seldom performed (mainly by national reference laboratories) and there is limited information available on their resistance trends, compared to other bacterial genera; susceptibility testing for anaerobic bacteria is also hindered by the lack of uniform standard operating procedures, while reliable testing methods (i.e., agar diffusion) are expensive and labor-intensive. Antibiotic resistance in anaerobes remains a neglected field of study; nevertheless, in recent decades, there has been an increasing number of reports on the emergence and molecular mechanisms of beta-lactam and metronidazole resistance in anaerobic bacteria. Nevertheless, with the emergence of microbiome research, and the introduction of the advanced methodologies in molecular biology and sequencing, there has been pronounced interest in anaerobic bacteria as constitutents of the human microbiome in the gut, and in other anatomical regions. As the composition of the microbiome may have far-reaching therapeutic and clinical implications, the field of microbiome studies may revolutionize medicine in the 21st century.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to enrich the existing literature regarding the emergence, testing methods, and mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in strict anaerobic bacteria, and the relevance of these microorganisms in the microbiome composition of healthy and ill individuals, therefore the submission of original articles, and review papers on these topics are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Edit Urbán
Dr. Márió Gajdács
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 2603 KiB  
Article
An Original and Efficient Antibiotic Adjuvant Strategy to Enhance the Activity of Macrolide Antibiotics against Gram-Negative Resistant Strains
by Azza Troudi, Jean Michel Bolla, Naouel Klibi and Jean Michel Brunel
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(20), 12457; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms232012457 - 18 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1623
Abstract
Gram-negative bacteria were reported as a significant cause of infections in both community and nosocomial settings. Considered as one of the greatest threats to public health, the spread of bacteria drug resistance and the lack of effective alternative treatment options remains problematic. Herein, [...] Read more.
Gram-negative bacteria were reported as a significant cause of infections in both community and nosocomial settings. Considered as one of the greatest threats to public health, the spread of bacteria drug resistance and the lack of effective alternative treatment options remains problematic. Herein, we report a promising strategy to combat Gram-negative resistant strains consisting of the combination of a macrolide antibiotic with a polyaminoisoprenyl adjuvant derivative leading to a significant decrease of antibiotic resistance. Full article
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