ijms-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Polyamines in Aging and Disease

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Endocrinology and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 July 2024 | Viewed by 10368

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Josai University, Saitama 330-0295, Japan
Interests: polyamines; polyamine oxidase; ageing; spermine oxidase; brain stroke

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Pharmacy, Chiba Institute of Science, Chiba 288-0025, Japan
Interests: polyamine; cell proliferation; cell viability; Escherichia coli; spermine; eEF1A; biofilm; spermidine; Shine–Dalgarno sequence; oxidative stress; CR sequence; glutathione; SoxR; GshA; BMAL1; circadian rhythm; clock gene; bio-molecules; polyamine modulon; regulation of metabolic rhythm

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Polyamines are bioactive amines found in almost all living organisms and are essential for normal cellular functions. The number of polyamines in cells is tightly regulated by metabolism: biosynthesis, degradation, and transport. Recent studies have shown that disturbances in polyamine metabolism are associated with aging and disease. Age-related reductions in polyamines have been shown to lead to reduced cognitive and physical function. In cancer, on the other hand, high levels of polyamines have been suggested to lead to a worse prognosis. As the global population ages, there is a need for technologies to prevent and overcome aging and various diseases and to extend healthy life spans. The aim of this Special Issue is to deepen our knowledge of the relationship between polyamines and aging and disease. This Special Issue invites contributors to publish important work that will clarify the relationship between polyamines and aging and disease and extend the healthy life span by preventing and overcoming various diseases.

Dr. Takeshi Uemura
Prof. Dr. Yusuke Terui
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • polyamines
  • bioactive amines
  • aging
  • senility
  • old people
  • spermine
  • spermidine
  • polyamine metabolism
  • polyamine oxidase
  • polyamine analogues
  • metabolic diseases in the elderly

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

17 pages, 10753 KiB  
Article
In Silico and In Vitro Approach for Evaluation of the Anti-Inflammatory and Antioxidant Potential of Mygalin
by Abraham Espinoza-Culupú, Nayara Del Santos, Mariella Farfán-López, Elizabeth Mendes, Pedro Ismael da Silva Junior and Monamaris Marques Borges
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(23), 17019; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms242317019 - 30 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1051
Abstract
There is a great interest in describing new molecules to be used as therapeutic targets in various diseases, particularly those that play a role in inflammatory responses and infection control. Mygalin is a synthetic analogue of spermidine, and previous studies have demonstrated its [...] Read more.
There is a great interest in describing new molecules to be used as therapeutic targets in various diseases, particularly those that play a role in inflammatory responses and infection control. Mygalin is a synthetic analogue of spermidine, and previous studies have demonstrated its bactericidal effect against Escherichia coli, as well as its ability to modulate the inflammatory response of macrophages against lipopolysaccharide (LPS). However, the mechanisms through which mygalin regulates this inflammatory response remain poorly characterized. A set of platforms using molecular docking analysis was employed to analyze various properties of mygalin, including toxicity, biodistribution, absorption, and the prediction of its anti-inflammatory properties. In in vitro assays, we evaluated the potential of mygalin to interact with products of the inflammatory response, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant activity, using the BMDM cell. The in silico analyses indicated that mygalin is not toxic, and can interact with proteins from the kinase group, and enzymes and receptors in eukaryotic cells. Molecular docking analysis showed interactions with key amino acid residues of COX-2, iNOS and 5-LOX enzymes. In vitro, assays demonstrated a significant reduction in the expression of iNOS and COX-2 induced by LPS, along with a decrease in the oxidative stress caused by the treatment with PMA, all without altering cell viability. Mygalin exhibited robust antioxidant activity in DPPH assays, regardless of the dose used, and inhibited heat-induced hemolysis. These studies suggest that mygalin holds promise for further investigation as a new molecule with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polyamines in Aging and Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

9 pages, 2402 KiB  
Article
Inhibition of Polyamine Catabolism Reduces Cellular Senescence
by Takeshi Uemura, Miki Matsunaga, Yuka Yokota, Koichi Takao and Takemitsu Furuchi
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(17), 13397; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms241713397 - 29 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1510
Abstract
The aging of the global population has necessitated the identification of effective anti-aging technologies based on scientific evidence. Polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) are essential for cell growth and function. Age-related reductions in polyamine levels have been shown to be associated with reduced [...] Read more.
The aging of the global population has necessitated the identification of effective anti-aging technologies based on scientific evidence. Polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) are essential for cell growth and function. Age-related reductions in polyamine levels have been shown to be associated with reduced cognitive and physical functions. We have previously found that the expression of spermine oxidase (SMOX) increases with age; however, the relationship between SMOX expression and cellular senescence remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between increased SMOX expression and cellular senescence using human-liver-derived HepG2 cells. Intracellular spermine levels decreased and spermidine levels increased with the serial passaging of cells (aged cells), and aged cells showed increased expression of SMOX. The levels of acrolein-conjugated protein, which is produced during spermine degradation, also increases. Senescence-associated β-gal activity was increased in aged cells, and the increase was suppressed by MDL72527, an inhibitor of acetylpolyamine oxidase (AcPAO) and SMOX, both of which are enzymes that catalyze polyamine degradation. DNA damage accumulated in aged cells and MDL72527 reduced DNA damage. These results suggest that the SMOX-mediated degradation of spermine plays an important role in cellular senescence. Our results demonstrate that cellular senescence can be controlled by inhibiting spermine degradation using a polyamine-catabolizing enzyme inhibitor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polyamines in Aging and Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 1812 KiB  
Article
Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) Channel Mediates Acrolein Cytotoxicity in Human Lung Cancer Cells
by Akihiko Sakamoto, Yusuke Terui, Kazuei Igarashi and Keiko Kashiwagi
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(14), 11847; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms241411847 - 24 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1167
Abstract
Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is a nonselective ion channel implicated in thermosensation and inflammatory pain. It has been reported that expression of the TRPA1 channel is induced by cigarette smoke extract. Acrolein found in cigarette smoke is highly toxic and known [...] Read more.
Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is a nonselective ion channel implicated in thermosensation and inflammatory pain. It has been reported that expression of the TRPA1 channel is induced by cigarette smoke extract. Acrolein found in cigarette smoke is highly toxic and known as an agonist of the TRPA1 channel. However, the role of TRPA1 in the cytotoxicity of acrolein remains unclear. Here, we investigated whether the TRPA1 channel is involved in the cytotoxicity of acrolein in human lung cancer A549 cells. The IC50 of acrolein in A549 cells was 25 μM, and acrolein toxicity increased in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. When the effect of acrolein on TRPA1 expression was examined, the expression of TRPA1 in A549 cells was increased by treatment with 50 μM acrolein for 24 h or 500 μM acrolein for 30 min. AP-1, a transcription factor, was activated in the cells treated with 50 μM acrolein for 24 h, while induction of NF-κB and HIF-1α was observed in the cells treated with 500 μM acrolein for 30 min. These results suggest that acrolein induces TRPA1 expression by activating these transcription factors. Overexpression of TRPA1 in A549 cells increased acrolein sensitivity and the level of protein-conjugated acrolein (PC-Acro), while knockdown of TRPA1 in A549 cells or treatment with a TRPA1 antagonist caused tolerance to acrolein. These findings suggest that acrolein induces the TRPA1 channel and that an increase in TRPA1 expression promotes the cytotoxicity of acrolein. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polyamines in Aging and Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 1715 KiB  
Article
Levilactobacillus brevis with High Production of Putrescine Isolated from Blue Cheese and Its Application
by Yuta Ami, Narumi Kodama, Masahiro Umeda, Hanae Nakamura, Hideto Shirasawa, Takashi Koyanagi and Shin Kurihara
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(11), 9668; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms24119668 - 2 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1911
Abstract
Polyamine intake has been reported to help extend the lifespan of animals. Fermented foods contain high concentrations of polyamines, produced by fermenting bacteria. Therefore, the bacteria, isolated from fermented foods that produce large amounts of polyamines, are potentially used as a source of [...] Read more.
Polyamine intake has been reported to help extend the lifespan of animals. Fermented foods contain high concentrations of polyamines, produced by fermenting bacteria. Therefore, the bacteria, isolated from fermented foods that produce large amounts of polyamines, are potentially used as a source of polyamines for humans. In this study, the strain Levilactobacillus brevis FB215, which has the ability to accumulate approximately 200 µM of putrescine in the culture supernatant, was isolated from fermented foods, specifically the Blue Stilton cheese. Furthermore, L. brevis FB215 synthesized putrescine from agmatine and ornithine, which are known polyamine precursors. When cultured in the extract of Sakekasu, a byproduct obtained during the brewing of Japanese rice wine containing high levels of both agmatine and ornithine, L. brevis FB215 grew to OD600 = 1.7 after 83 h of cultivation and accumulated high concentrations (~1 mM) of putrescine in the culture supernatant. The fermentation product also did not contain histamine or tyramine. The Sakekasu-derived ingredient fermented by the food-derived lactic acid bacteria developed in this study could contribute to increasing polyamine intake in humans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polyamines in Aging and Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

17 pages, 2315 KiB  
Review
The Molecular Role of Polyamines in Age-Related Diseases: An Update
by Guadalupe Elizabeth Jimenez Gutierrez, Fabiola V. Borbolla Jiménez, Luis G. Muñoz, Yessica Sarai Tapia Guerrero, Nadia Mireya Murillo Melo, José Melesio Cristóbal-Luna, Norberto Leyva Garcia, Joaquín Cordero-Martínez and Jonathan J. Magaña
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(22), 16469; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms242216469 - 17 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2261
Abstract
Polyamines (Pas) are short molecules that exhibit two or three amine groups that are positively charged at a physiological pH. These small molecules are present in high concentrations in a wide variety of organisms and tissues, suggesting that they play an important role [...] Read more.
Polyamines (Pas) are short molecules that exhibit two or three amine groups that are positively charged at a physiological pH. These small molecules are present in high concentrations in a wide variety of organisms and tissues, suggesting that they play an important role in cellular physiology. Polyamines include spermine, spermidine, and putrescine, which play important roles in age-related diseases that have not been completely elucidated. Aging is a natural process, defined as the time-related deterioration of the physiological functions; it is considered a risk factor for degenerative diseases such as cardiovascular, neurodegenerative, and musculoskeletal diseases; arthritis; and even cancer. In this review, we provide a new perspective on the participation of Pas in the cellular and molecular processes related to age-related diseases, focusing our attention on important degenerative diseases such as Alzheimerߣs disease, Parkinsonߣs disease, osteoarthritis, sarcopenia, and osteoporosis. This new perspective leads us to propose that Pas function as novel biomarkers for age-related diseases, with the main purpose of achieving new molecular alternatives for healthier aging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polyamines in Aging and Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 1519 KiB  
Review
Polyamines in Ovarian Aging and Disease
by Bo Kang, Xin Wang, Xiaoguang An, Chengweng Ji, Weikang Ling, Yuxin Qi, Shuo Li and Dongmei Jiang
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(20), 15330; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms242015330 - 18 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1525
Abstract
Ovarian aging and disease-related decline in fertility are challenging medical and economic issues with an increasing prevalence. Polyamines are a class of polycationic alkylamines widely distributed in mammals. They are small molecules essential for cell growth and development. Polyamines alleviate ovarian aging through [...] Read more.
Ovarian aging and disease-related decline in fertility are challenging medical and economic issues with an increasing prevalence. Polyamines are a class of polycationic alkylamines widely distributed in mammals. They are small molecules essential for cell growth and development. Polyamines alleviate ovarian aging through various biological processes, including reproductive hormone synthesis, cell metabolism, programmed cell death, etc. However, an abnormal increase in polyamine levels can lead to ovarian damage and promote the development of ovarian disease. Therefore, polyamines have long been considered potential therapeutic targets for aging and disease, but their regulatory roles in the ovary deserve further investigation. This review discusses the mechanisms by which polyamines ameliorate human ovarian aging and disease through different biological processes, such as autophagy and oxidative stress, to develop safe and effective polyamine targeted therapy strategies for ovarian aging and the diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polyamines in Aging and Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop