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Beyond Compatibility: Unraveling the Molecular Dynamics of Biomaterial-Host Interactions

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 May 2024) | Viewed by 2695

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Division of Plastic Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA
Interests: biomaterial‒host interactions; silk; biofilms; bacteria‒host interaction; chronic inflammation; rejection

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Biomaterials, including bioactive ceramics, polymers, silk, and composites, have long been used in a multitude of medical applications, from implants to drug delivery platforms and regenerative medicine. While these materials have been widely acknowledged for their biocompatibility and bioactivity, the complex interplay between the biomaterials and host biological systems at the molecular level remains largely unexplored. Biomaterial‒host interaction is a critical determinant in the successful integration of these materials into the body, affecting everything from tissue regeneration to the risk of infection and inflammation. Furthermore, with the escalating problem of antibiotic resistance worldwide, it is essential to move beyond the simplistic paradigm of mere biocompatibility and delve into the molecular dynamics that underlie these interactions.

The investigation of biomaterial‒host interactions at a molecular level brings new challenges and opportunities. The use of advanced analytical techniques and simulation models will be crucial in gaining insights into these complex interactions. Moreover, understanding the role of surface modifications, such as the addition of antimicrobial compounds or bioactive molecules, in modulating these interactions could lead to the development of biomaterials with enhanced therapeutic efficacy and safety.

This Special Issue, presided by Dr. Samuel J. Lin as Guest Editor and Dr. Jose Antonio Foppiani as Publicity Editor, invites cutting-edge research papers and comprehensive reviews from materials scientists, biomedical engineers, cell biologists, biochemists, and clinicians who are at the forefront of this intriguing research frontier. The objective is to further our understanding of the molecular dynamics that dictate the interaction of biomaterials with host tissues, thereby advancing the development of next-generation biomaterials that not only exhibit biocompatibility but also actively interact with the biological milieu to promote healing and prevent infections. This deeper knowledge will set the stage for a more effective use of biomaterials in clinical settings, leading to improved patient outcomes.

Dr. Samuel J Lin
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • molecular dynamics
  • biomaterial‒host interactions
  • biofilms
  • bacteria‒host interaction
  • chronic inflammation
  • rejection

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

28 pages, 1091 KiB  
Review
An Update on Implant-Associated Malignancies and Their Biocompatibility
by Grace C. Keane Tahmaseb, Alexandra M. Keane, Jose A. Foppiani and Terence M. Myckatyn
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(9), 4653; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25094653 - 24 Apr 2024
Viewed by 951
Abstract
Implanted medical devices are widely used across various medical specialties for numerous applications, ranging from cardiovascular supports to orthopedic prostheses and cosmetic enhancements. However, recent observations have raised concerns about the potential of these implants to induce malignancies in the tissues surrounding them. [...] Read more.
Implanted medical devices are widely used across various medical specialties for numerous applications, ranging from cardiovascular supports to orthopedic prostheses and cosmetic enhancements. However, recent observations have raised concerns about the potential of these implants to induce malignancies in the tissues surrounding them. There have been several case reports documenting the occurrence of cancers adjacent to these devices, prompting a closer examination of their safety. This review delves into the epidemiology, clinical presentations, pathological findings, and hypothesized mechanisms of carcinogenesis related to implanted devices. It also explores how the surgical domain and the intrinsic properties and biocompatibility of the implants might influence the development of these rare but serious malignancies. Understanding these associations is crucial for assessing the risks associated with the use of medical implants, and for developing strategies to mitigate potential adverse outcomes. Full article
14 pages, 480 KiB  
Review
Incidental Bystander or Essential Culprit: A Systematic Review of Bacterial Significance in the Pathogenesis of Breast Implant-Associated Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma
by Jose A. Foppiani, Otakar Raska, Iulianna Taritsa, Angelica Hernandez Alvarez, Daniela Lee, Maria J. Escobar-Domingo, Josephine Berger, Pavel Klener, Kirsten A. Schuster, Daoud Abdo, Mark W. Clemens and Samuel J. Lin
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(1), 355; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25010355 - 26 Dec 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1378
Abstract
Breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL) is a distinct subtype of T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma that arises in the context of prolonged exposure to textured breast implants. The intent of this manuscript is to explore whether the bacterial presence in biofilms on these [...] Read more.
Breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL) is a distinct subtype of T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma that arises in the context of prolonged exposure to textured breast implants. The intent of this manuscript is to explore whether the bacterial presence in biofilms on these implants is a mere incidental finding or plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of BIA-ALCL. Our goal is to delineate the extent of bacterial involvement, offering insights into potential underlying mechanisms, and establishing future research priorities aimed at resolving the remaining uncertainties surrounding this complex association. A comprehensive systematic review of several databases was performed. The search strategy was designed and conducted by an experienced librarian using controlled vocabulary with keywords. The electronic search identified 442 publications. After evaluation, six studies from 2015 to 2021 were included, encompassing 201 female patients aged 23 to 75. The diagnosis span post-implantation ranged from 53 to 135.6 months. Studies consistently found bacteria near breast implants in both BIA-ALCL cases and controls, with varied microbial findings. Both BIA-ALCL cases and controls exhibited the presence of specific bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella oxytoca, Staphylococcus aureus, and Ralstonia spp., without any statistically significant differences between groups. The use of antiseptic and antimicrobial agents during implant insertion did not demonstrate any impact on reducing or altering the risk of developing BIA-ALCL. Our systematic review reveals that the current evidence is inadequate to link bacterial etiology as a central factor in the development of BIA-ALCL. The limitations in the existing data prevent a complete dismissal of the role of biofilms in its pathogenesis. The observed gap in knowledge underscores the need for more focused and comprehensive research, which should be structured in a multi-faceted approach. Initially, this involves the utilization of sophisticated genomic and proteomic methods. Following this, it is crucial to delve into the study of immunological reactions specifically induced by biofilms. Finally, this research should incorporate extended observational studies, meticulously tracking the evolution of biofilm development and its correlation with the emergence of BIA-ALCL. In light of the inconclusive nature of current findings, further investigation is not only justified but urgently needed to clarify these unresolved issues. Full article
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