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Advances in Natural Active Products Derived from Foods: Antioxidant, Antinociceptive and Anti-inflammatory Activities

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioactives and Nutraceuticals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 October 2024 | Viewed by 3076

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Medicine and Surgery, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, 00168 Rome, Italy
Interests: antioxidants; nutraceuticals; phenolic compounds; anti-inflammatory potential; antidiabetic activity; enzyme inhibition
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, the exploration of natural active compounds derived from various foods has garnered substantial attention in the fields of health, nutrition, and pharmaceutical research. In this context, these compounds’ antioxidant, antinociceptive, and anti-inflammatory activities hold great promise for use in preventive and therapeutic applications.

This Special Issue is dedicated to unraveling the intricate interplay between these bioactive agents and their impacts on human health. The complexity of these compounds extends far beyond their respective nutritional value. Their multifaceted roles in modulating cellular processes and mitigating oxidative stress, pain, and inflammation present a frontier ripe for exploration. 

We invite researchers working in these fields to contribute their insights to advance the identification, mechanisms, and applications of these active compounds. By delving into their synergistic effects, bioavailability, and clinical implications, we aim to foster a comprehensive understanding of the potential benefits that natural food-derived products offer. Through this Special Issue, we aspire to highlight advancements related to the utilization of these compounds as valuable resources to promote well-being and address health challenges.

Dr. Elisabetta Schiano (from the University of Naples Federico II, Italy) is an experienced scientist who serves on the Topical Advisory Panel for IJMS, and Dr. Fortuna Iannuzzo (from the University of Naples Federico II, Italy) is an experienced scientist who assisted Schiano in organizing this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Ettore Novellino
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antioxidants
  • bioactive compounds
  • food-derived products
  • health benefits
  • nutraceuticals
  • inflammation
  • pain management

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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25 pages, 5024 KiB  
Article
Characterization and Hydrolysis Studies of a Prodrug Obtained as Ester Conjugate of Geraniol and Ferulic Acid by Enzymatic Way
by Lindomar Alberto Lerin, Giada Botti, Alessandro Dalpiaz, Anna Bianchi, Luca Ferraro, Chaimae Chaibi, Federico Zappaterra, Domenico Meola, Pier Paolo Giovannini and Barbara Pavan
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(11), 6263; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25116263 - 6 Jun 2024
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Abstract
Ferulic acid (Fer) and geraniol (Ger) are natural compounds whose antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity confer beneficial properties, such as antibacterial, anticancer, and neuroprotective effects. However, the short half-lives of these compounds impair their therapeutic activities after conventional administration. We propose, therefore, a new [...] Read more.
Ferulic acid (Fer) and geraniol (Ger) are natural compounds whose antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity confer beneficial properties, such as antibacterial, anticancer, and neuroprotective effects. However, the short half-lives of these compounds impair their therapeutic activities after conventional administration. We propose, therefore, a new prodrug (Fer-Ger) obtained by a bio-catalyzed ester conjugation of Fer and Ger to enhance the loading of solid lipid microparticles (SLMs) designed as Fer-Ger delivery and targeting systems. SLMs were obtained by hot emulsion techniques without organic solvents. HPLC-UV analysis evidenced that Fer-Ger is hydrolyzed in human or rat whole blood and rat liver homogenates, with half-lives of 193.64 ± 20.93, 20.15 ± 0.75, and 3.94 ± 0.33 min, respectively, but not in rat brain homogenates. Studies on neuronal-differentiated mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells incubated with the reactive oxygen species (ROS) inductor H2O2 evidenced the Fer-Ger ability to prevent oxidative injury, despite the fact that it appears ROS-promoting. The amounts of Fer-Ger encapsulated in tristearin SLMs, obtained in the absence or presence of glucose, were 1.5 ± 0.1%, allowing the control of the prodrug release (glucose absence) or to sensibly enhance its water dissolution rate (glucose presence). These new “green” carriers can potentially prolong the beneficial effects of Fer and Ger or induce neuroprotection as nasal formulations. Full article
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15 pages, 4091 KiB  
Article
Therapeutic Effect of an Ursolic Acid-Based Nutraceutical on Neuronal Regeneration after Sciatic Nerve Injury
by Fortuna Iannuzzo, Annunziata Gaetana Cicatiello, Serena Sagliocchi, Elisabetta Schiano, Annarita Nappi, Caterina Miro, Mariano Stornaiuolo, Adriano Mollica, Gian Carlo Tenore, Monica Dentice and Ettore Novellino
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(2), 902; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25020902 - 11 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Peripheral nerve injuries lead to severe functional impairments and long recovery times, with limited effectiveness and accessibility of current treatments. This has increased interest in natural bioactive compounds, such as ursolic acid (UA). Our study evaluated the effect of an oleolyte rich in [...] Read more.
Peripheral nerve injuries lead to severe functional impairments and long recovery times, with limited effectiveness and accessibility of current treatments. This has increased interest in natural bioactive compounds, such as ursolic acid (UA). Our study evaluated the effect of an oleolyte rich in UA from white grape pomace (WGPO) on neuronal regeneration in mice with induced sciatic nerve resection, administered concurrently with the induced damage (the WGPO group) and 10 days prior (the PRE-WGPO group). The experiment was monitored at two-time points (4 and 10 days) after injury. After 10 days, the WGPO group demonstrated a reduction in muscle atrophy, evidenced by an increased number and diameter of muscle fibers and a decreased Atrogin-1 and Murf-1 expression relative to the denervated control. It was also observed that 85.7% of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) were fully innervated, as indicated by the colocalization of α-bungarotoxin and synaptophysin, along with the significant modulation of Oct-6 and S-100. The PRE-WGPO group showed a more beneficial effect on nerve fiber reformation, with a significant increase in myelin protein zero and 95.2% fully innervated NMJs, and a pro-hypertrophic effect in resting non-denervated muscles. Our findings suggest WGPO as a potential treatment for various conditions that require the repair of nerve and muscle injuries. Full article
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Review

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32 pages, 4048 KiB  
Review
Therapeutic Potential of Ginsenosides on Bone Metabolism: A Review of Osteoporosis, Periodontal Disease and Osteoarthritis
by Seon-Yle Ko
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(11), 5828; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25115828 - 27 May 2024
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Abstract
Ginsenosides, bioactive compounds from the genus Panax, have potential therapeutic effects on diverse ailments, including diabetes. Emerging evidence suggests their involvement in bone metabolism. The present review summarizes the current understanding of the effects of ginsenosides on osteoporosis, periodontal disease, and osteoarthritis. [...] Read more.
Ginsenosides, bioactive compounds from the genus Panax, have potential therapeutic effects on diverse ailments, including diabetes. Emerging evidence suggests their involvement in bone metabolism. The present review summarizes the current understanding of the effects of ginsenosides on osteoporosis, periodontal disease, and osteoarthritis. Their mechanisms of action include effects on osteoblasts, osteoclasts, periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLFs), and chondrocytes, which are pivotal in maintaining bone, periodontal tissue, and cartilage homeostasis. Ginsenosides may exert their beneficial effects by enhancing PDLF and osteoblast activity, suppressing osteoclast function, augmenting chondrocyte synthesis in the cartilage matrix, and mitigating connective tissue degradation. Moreover, they possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and anti-pyroptotic properties. Their efficacy in increasing bone density, ameliorating periodontitis, and alleviating osteoarthritis symptoms has been demonstrated in preclinical studies using animal models. In terms of their mechanism of action, ginsenosides modulate cellular differentiation, activity, and key signaling pathway molecules, such as mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), while also regulating various mediators. Furthermore, the symptomatic relief observed in animal models lends further credence to their therapeutic utility. However, to translate these preclinical findings into clinical practice, rigorous animal and clinical investigations are imperative to ascertain the safety, efficacy, and optimal dosing regimens in human subjects. Full article
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29 pages, 2133 KiB  
Review
Regulation Mechanism and Potential Value of Active Substances in Spices in Alcohol–Liver–Intestine Axis Health
by Jianyu Huang, Tao Huang and Jinjun Li
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(7), 3728; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25073728 - 27 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Excessive alcohol intake will aggravate the health risk between the liver and intestine and affect the multi-directional information exchange of metabolites between host cells and microbial communities. Because of the side effects of clinical drugs, people tend to explore the intervention value of [...] Read more.
Excessive alcohol intake will aggravate the health risk between the liver and intestine and affect the multi-directional information exchange of metabolites between host cells and microbial communities. Because of the side effects of clinical drugs, people tend to explore the intervention value of natural drugs on diseases. As a flavor substance, spices have been proven to have medicinal value, but they are still rare in treating hepatointestinal diseases caused by alcohol. This paper summarized the metabolic transformation of alcohol in the liver and intestine and summarized the potential value of various perfume active substances in improving liver and intestine diseases caused by alcohol. It is also found that bioactive substances in spices can exert antioxidant activity in the liver and intestine environment and reduce the oxidative stress caused by diseases. These substances can interfere with fatty acid synthesis, promote sugar and lipid metabolism, and reduce liver injury caused by steatosis. They can effectively regulate the balance of intestinal flora, promote the production of SCFAs, and restore the intestinal microenvironment. Full article
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