Fungal Diseases and Pathogens Affecting Horticultural Crops: New Challenges

A special issue of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Pathology and Disease Management (PPDM)".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 April 2024 | Viewed by 1587

Special Issue Editors

Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
Interests: plant microbiome; plant-microbe interactions; metagenomics; plant health
College of Horticulture, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, China
Interests: grape; fungal disease; effector; biocontrol
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology in Arid Areas, College of Horticulture, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, China
Interests: stress; resistance; ROS; phytohormone; host-pathogen interactions; disease control; molecular breeding
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is dedicated to exploring the latest challenges, research developments, and innovative strategies in understanding, managing, and mitigating fungal diseases and pathogens that afflict horticultural crops. It provides a platform for researchers, scientists, and experts in plant pathology, agriculture, and related fields to contribute their findings and insights.

We welcome submissions of different article types, such as original research, methods, mini-review, review, and perspective articles, dealing with fungal diseases and pathogens affecting horticultural crops. We particularly encourage studies on fungal disease dynamics, pathogen identification and characterization, host–pathogen interactions, disease management strategies, crop protection, diagnostic tools, sustainable agriculture practices, genetic diversity and germplasm conservation, emerging threats, case studies, success stories, and future directions.

By encompassing these areas, this Special Issue aims to contribute to the advancement of knowledge and the development of sustainable strategies for protecting and enhancing the productivity of horticultural crops in the face of evolving fungal challenges.

Dr. Manuel Anguita Maeso
Dr. Zhi Li
Dr. Min Gao
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Horticulturae is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fungal diseases
  • pathogens
  • horticultural crops
  • plant pathology
  • crop protection

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

23 pages, 10059 KiB  
Article
Biological Control and Cross Infections of the Neofusicoccum spp. Causing Mango Postharvest Rots in Spain
Horticulturae 2024, 10(2), 166; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae10020166 - 11 Feb 2024
Viewed by 425
Abstract
Mango is one of the main subtropical crops growing in southern Spain. Spanish mango fruit production can be efficiently transported to the rest of Europe, and these mangoes are very appreciated for their quality and flavour. However, postharvest rots have been detected in [...] Read more.
Mango is one of the main subtropical crops growing in southern Spain. Spanish mango fruit production can be efficiently transported to the rest of Europe, and these mangoes are very appreciated for their quality and flavour. However, postharvest rots have been detected in stored mango fruits, making their commercialization difficult. The causal agents associated with such rot symptoms have been isolated and identified. Because the mango crops used to share the same growing area with avocado crops, fungal presence on surrounding asymptomatic avocado fruits was also analysed to detect potential cross infections. Artificial inoculation with Neofusicoccum parvum and N. mediterraneum was able to reproduce rot symptoms in mango but was also able to induce rots in avocado fruits. To approach a biological control strategy against these rot-producing fungi, two very well-known antagonistic biocontrol bacteria, Pseudomonas chlororaphis PCL1606, and Bacillus velezensis UMAF6639, were tested. The obtained results revealed that both bacteria can control the fungal rots on stored mango and avocado fruits under controlled conditions. Additionally, the strain B. velezensis UMAF6639 showed the ability to persist on the fruit surface of adult commercial trees in experiments under open field conditions, helping to prevent the appearance of these postharvest diseases. Full article
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11 pages, 1760 KiB  
Article
First Molecular Phylogenetic Identification and Report of Pseudocercospora cannabina Causing Leaf Spot Disease on Cannabis sativa in Thailand
Horticulturae 2023, 9(12), 1261; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9121261 - 23 Nov 2023
Viewed by 793
Abstract
Cannabis sativa is gaining attention as an agronomically important crop in many countries around the world. The identification and control of leaf diseases in cannabis are very important for cannabis cultivators as leaves are the most economically important part of the cannabis plants. [...] Read more.
Cannabis sativa is gaining attention as an agronomically important crop in many countries around the world. The identification and control of leaf diseases in cannabis are very important for cannabis cultivators as leaves are the most economically important part of the cannabis plants. In 2022, several cannabis plants in cultivations showing olive leaf spot symptoms emerged from Chiang Rai province, Thailand. Preliminary studies indicated that the causal organism is Pseudocercospora sp. Species of Pseudocercospora are important plant pathogens that are now identified through morphological studies combined with DNA sequence data of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS), Actin (act), Translation Elongation Factor (tef), and RNA Polymerase II second largest subunit (rpb2) gene regions. We aimed to investigate and understand the emergence of olive leaf spot disease in cannabis plants in Chiang Rai province, Thailand, with a specific focus on the combined morpho-molecular identification of the pathogen. In our study, Pseudocercospora cannabina, the causal organism of olive leaf spot disease, was identified as the leaf spot-causing pathogen with both morphological and phylogenetic analyses. Our study is the first to provide molecular data for Ps. cannabina as the typenor Ps. cannabina isolates from previous studies have made molecular data available for this species. A pathogenicity test, re-isolation, and identification steps were performed to fulfill Koch’s postulates. This comprehensive approach enhances our understanding of the olive leaf spot disease and its causative agent in cannabis. Full article
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