Ultrasound Imaging Advances and Research in Healthcare

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "TeleHealth and Digital Healthcare".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2022) | Viewed by 30751

Special Issue Editors


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Department of Physiotherapy, University of Seville, Avicena Street, 41009 Seville, Spain
Interests: quality of life; perfommance; musculoskeletal disorders; physiotherapy; tendinopathy; ultrasound and invasive physiotherapy (guided intervention)
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1. MVClinic Institute, 28600 Madrid, Spain
2. Department of Physical Therapy, University CEU San Pablo, 28925 Madrid, Spain
3. Getafe C.F., 28903 Madrid, Spain
Interests: invasive physiotherapy; musculoskeletal ultrasound; percutaneous needle electrolysis; percutaneous neuromodulation
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Facultad de Enfermería, Fisioterapia y Podología, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: ligaments; muscles; myofascial pain syndrome; musculoskeletal disorders; sports; tendons; ultrasonography
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Research, Health and Podiatry Group, Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Nursing and Podiatry, Universidade da Coruña, 150403 Ferrol, Spain
Interests: biomechanics; quality of life; shoes; pain; epidemiology; orthopedics; podiatry; prevention and promotion of the health; rehabilitation
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ultrasonography may be considered a useful tool in medicine and physical therapy, permitting novel static and dynamic evaluations for joint, nerve, muscle, tendon, and ligament structures. In recent years, new image-analysis software has been developed in order to obtain promising high-quality ultrasound images and novel pixel analyses. Currently, ultrasound imaging has been applied to assess and quantify the morphology and echotexture parameters of the muscle and fascial tissues. There is evidence to support the addition of the ultrasound imaging evaluation to a diagnostic or treatment programs in physical therapy could in order to provide quantitative and qualitative information of the musculoskeletal system. Additionally, novel vidence-based invasive therapies were assisted by ultrasound imaging in order to develop an accurate and safe procedure, such as electrolysis, neuromodulation, dry needling, electrostimulation. The use of ultrasound-guided invasive therapies are being widely studied due to the evidence benefits in acute and chronic musculoskeletal syndromes.

I would like to invite researchers from across the world to contribute their knowledge, insights, and findings in the form of novel and original research articles and reviews for this Special Issue entitle “Ultrasound imaging advances and research in healthcare”.The purpose of this Special Issue is to highlight the benefits of the ultrasound imaging for the prevention, diagnostic and management of different pathologies and syndromes related with the health of the general population.

Prof. Dr. Carlos Romero-Morales
Dr. Blanca de la Cruz-Torres
Prof. Dr. Fermín Valera-Garrido
Prof. Dr. César Calvo-Lobo
Prof. Dr. Daniel López-López
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • Physical therapy
  • Health
  • Pain
  • Musculoskeletal disorder
  • Diagnosis
  • Ultrasound imaging
  • Invasive procedures
  • Rehabilitation
  • Training
  • Sport

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 842 KiB  
Article
Anterior Ocular Biometrics as Measured by Ultrasound Biomicroscopy
by Mutasem Elfalah, Mona Mohammad, Mario Damiano Toro, Nakhleh Abu-Yaghi, Robert Rejdak and Yacoub A. Yousef
Healthcare 2022, 10(7), 1188; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10071188 - 24 Jun 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1884
Abstract
Background: High frequency ultrasonography (ultrasound biomicroscopy; UBM) is an ophthalmic diagnostic tool that can be used to measure the depth of the anterior segment (ASD), the anterior chamber angle (ACA), as well as thicknesses of the iris and the ciliary body (CB). Methods: [...] Read more.
Background: High frequency ultrasonography (ultrasound biomicroscopy; UBM) is an ophthalmic diagnostic tool that can be used to measure the depth of the anterior segment (ASD), the anterior chamber angle (ACA), as well as thicknesses of the iris and the ciliary body (CB). Methods: The anterior segment dimensions and thicknesses were measured by Sonomed 35-MHz. Results: Measurements for 95 eyes from 52 adults were analyzed. The mean and median ASD and ACA were 2.91, 2.92 ± 0.41 mm and 34.1, 34.3 ± 12.1 degrees, respectively. The angle superiorly was wider than inferiorly (p = 0.04). At the root of the iris, the mid of the iris, and the juxtapupillary edge of the iris, the iris thicknesses (median, mean) were 0.40, 0.41 ± 0.1, 0.50, 0.51 ± 0.1, and 0.70, 0.71 ± 0.1 mm, respectively. The thicknesses of CB and CB together with the ciliary processes (median, mean), were 0.70, 0.71 ± 0.15 mm and 1.36, 1.41 ± 0.15 mm, respectively. The upper quadrant of both the iris and the CB was significantly thicker than the lower quadrant (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Our biometric measurements for the anterior segment can be used as normative data for anterior segment depth and angle and iris and ciliary body thickness in normal eyes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrasound Imaging Advances and Research in Healthcare)
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10 pages, 1204 KiB  
Article
Muscle Quality Assessment by Ultrasound Imaging of the Intrinsic Foot Muscles in Individuals with and without Plantar Fasciitis: A Case–Control Study
by Lorena Canosa-Carro, Daniel López-López, Carmen de Labra, Raquel Díaz-Meco-Conde, Blanca de-la-Cruz-Torres and Carlos Romero-Morales
Healthcare 2022, 10(3), 526; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10030526 - 14 Mar 2022
Viewed by 2633
Abstract
Objective: The primary aim of the present study was to compare the echo intensity (EI) and echovariation (EV) of the intrinsic foot muscles (IFMs) between individuals with and without plantar fasciitis (PF), using ultrasound imaging. The secondary objective was to study the intra-rater [...] Read more.
Objective: The primary aim of the present study was to compare the echo intensity (EI) and echovariation (EV) of the intrinsic foot muscles (IFMs) between individuals with and without plantar fasciitis (PF), using ultrasound imaging. The secondary objective was to study the intra-rater reliability of the echotexture variables. Methods: A case–control study was conducted with 64 participants, who were divided into the following two groups: A, the PF group (n = 32); B, the healthy group (n = 32). Results: The comparison between the two groups did not identify significant differences (p > 0.05) between the flexor hallucis brevis (FHB), flexor digitorum brevis (FDB), quadratus plantae (QP) and abductor hallucis brevis (AHB) variables for the EI and EV. Moreover, excellent intra-rater reliability was reported for the following ultrasound imaging EI variables: ABH (ICC = 0.951), FHB (ICC = 0.949), FDB (ICC = 0.981) and QP (ICC = 0.984). Conclusions: The muscle quality assessment using the EI and EV variables did not identify differences in the FHB, FDB, AHB and QP muscles between individuals with and without PF through USI evaluation. The reliability of all the IFM measurements was reported to be excellent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrasound Imaging Advances and Research in Healthcare)
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13 pages, 7442 KiB  
Article
Quantitative Ultrasound Changes in Echotexture and Functional Parameters after a Multicomponent Training Program in Pre-Frailty Individuals: A Pilot Randomized Clinical Trial
by Sergio López-López, Helios Pareja-Galeano, Jaime Almazán-Polo, Charles Cotteret, Patricia Téllez-González, César Calvo-Lobo, Luis Perea-Unceta and Carlos Romero-Morales
Healthcare 2021, 9(10), 1279; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9101279 - 28 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1906
Abstract
Objective: Currently, ultrasound imaging (USI) is considered a feasible tool in the evaluation of structural and textural muscle differences due to aging. The main aim of this study was to evaluate sonographic changes in muscular structure and function after a 12-week multicomponent training [...] Read more.
Objective: Currently, ultrasound imaging (USI) is considered a feasible tool in the evaluation of structural and textural muscle differences due to aging. The main aim of this study was to evaluate sonographic changes in muscular structure and function after a 12-week multicomponent training program in pre-frailty individuals. Design: A prospective, randomized, clinical trial was carried out. Participants: Thirty-two pre-frailty subjects were recruited and randomly divided into a multicomponent training program group (n = 16; Multicomponent group) and a conventional care group (n = 14; Control group) with a 12-week follow up. Main outcome measures: Rectus femoris thickness, cross-sectional area (CSA), echointensity, echovariation and vastus lateralis pennation angle tests were carried out to assess the structure and echotexture, and the force–velocity (F-V) profile for muscle power and muscle strength was employed to assess the functional parameters. Results: Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were shown for the left rectus femoris echointensity and in the functional parameter of muscle power after a 12-week program for the multicomponent training group compared to the conventional care group. Conclusions: Pre-frailty elderly subjects showed a decrease in rectus femoris echointensity (RF-EI) and an increase in the functional parameter of muscle power after a 12-week multicomponent training program compared to the control group. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrasound Imaging Advances and Research in Healthcare)
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10 pages, 688 KiB  
Article
M-Mode Ultrasound Examination of Soleus Muscle in Healthy Subjects: Intra- and Inter-Rater Reliability Study
by Carlos Romero-Morales, Cesar Calvo-Lobo, Emmanuel Navarro-Flores, Victoria Mazoteras-Pardo, Paula García-Bermejo, Daniel López-López, Eva María Martínez-Jiménez and Blanca De-la-Cruz-Torres
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 555; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040555 - 11 Dec 2020
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 4106
Abstract
Objective: M-mode ultrasound imaging (US) reflects the motion of connective tissue within muscles. The objectives of this study were to evaluate inter-rater and intra-rater reliability of soleus muscle measurements between examiners with different levels of US experience in asymptomatic subjects and to investigate [...] Read more.
Objective: M-mode ultrasound imaging (US) reflects the motion of connective tissue within muscles. The objectives of this study were to evaluate inter-rater and intra-rater reliability of soleus muscle measurements between examiners with different levels of US experience in asymptomatic subjects and to investigate the level of soleus muscle isometric activity in two positions (knee extended and knee flexed at 30°). Methods: Thirty volunteers without a history of ankle pain were evaluated with US examinations of the soleus muscle. Each muscle was scanned independently by two evaluators. Muscle at rest thickness, maximal isometric contraction thickness, time and velocity measures were detailed and blinded to the other examiner. Results: Intra- and inter-rater reliability at rest, in maximal isometric contraction thickness, contraction time and contraction velocity measures for both positions (extended and flexed knee) were reported from good to excellent for all outcome measurements. The position with the knee extended reported a statistically significant increase in thickness after motion showing 1.33 ± 0.27 mm for measurements at rest thickness with knee extended versus 1.50 ± 0.29 mm for measurements at end thickness with the knee in flexed position (p = 0.001), as well as 1.31 ± 0.23 mm for rest thickness with the knee in flexed position measurements with respect to 1.34 ± 0.24 mm for maximal isometric contraction thickness with extended knee measurements (p = 0.058). Conclusions: This study found that intra- and inter-examiner reliability of M-mode ultrasound imaging of the soleus muscle was excellent in asymptomatic subjects and the soleus muscle activity was different between the position with the knee extended and the position with the knee flexed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrasound Imaging Advances and Research in Healthcare)
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Review

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13 pages, 682 KiB  
Review
Could Ultrasound Be Used as a Triage Tool in Diagnosing Fractures in Children? A Literature Review
by Roxana Iacob, Emil Robert Stoicescu, Simona Cerbu, Daniela Iacob, Elena Amaricai, Liliana Catan, Oana Belei and Emil Radu Iacob
Healthcare 2022, 10(5), 823; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10050823 - 29 Apr 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2026
Abstract
Fracture is one of the most frequent causes of emergency department visits in children, conventional radiography being the standard imaging tool used for following procedures and treatment. This imagistic method is irradiating and harmful, especially for children due to their high cell division [...] Read more.
Fracture is one of the most frequent causes of emergency department visits in children, conventional radiography being the standard imaging tool used for following procedures and treatment. This imagistic method is irradiating and harmful, especially for children due to their high cell division rate. For this reason, we searched the literature to see if musculoskeletal ultrasound is a good alternative for diagnostic and follow-up regarding fractures in the pediatric population. After searching the databases using MeSH terms and manual filters, 24 articles that compare X-ray and ultrasound regarding their specificity and sensitivity in diagnosing fractures were included in this study. In the majority of the studied articles, the specificity and sensitivity of ultrasound are around 90–100%, and with high PPVs (positive predictive values) and NPVs (negative predictive values). Although it cannot replace conventional radiography, it is a great complementary tool in fracture diagnosis, having a sensitivity of nearly 100% when combined with clinical suspicion of fracture, compared with X-ray. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrasound Imaging Advances and Research in Healthcare)
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19 pages, 1306 KiB  
Review
Possible Effects on Health of Ultrasound Exposure, Risk Factors in the Work Environment and Occupational Safety Review
by David Baeza Moyano, Daniel Arranz Paraiso and Roberto Alonso González-Lezcano
Healthcare 2022, 10(3), 423; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10030423 - 24 Feb 2022
Cited by 25 | Viewed by 7522
Abstract
Ultrasonic waves are mechanical waves with a frequency greater than 20,000 Hz. Ultrasonic waves are emitted by devices that are used in industry or that have a medical or aesthetic purpose. There is growing interest in the effect of ultrasound absorption on the [...] Read more.
Ultrasonic waves are mechanical waves with a frequency greater than 20,000 Hz. Ultrasonic waves are emitted by devices that are used in industry or that have a medical or aesthetic purpose. There is growing interest in the effect of ultrasound absorption on the human body, since people’s exposure to these acoustic waves has increased considerably in recent years. There are more and more devices that emit ultrasounds used for different sanitary procedures, aesthetic treatments and industrial processes, creating more possibilities of ultrasound noise, and therefore an increased risk of occupational hazard and occupational danger. Experiments on animals have shown damage to internal organs from receiving different ultrasonic frequencies. The main task of this work was to organize and summarize recent studies on ultrasound to reflect the current state of this technique and establish a systematic basis for future lines of research. This work has allowed us to better understand the unknown field of these high frequencies of sound, and highlights the need to carry out more studies on the ultrasound emissions that can be absorbed by the human body to determine how this energy could affect humans by calculating the maximum dose of exposure and developing manuals for the use of ultrasound-emitting equipment to protect the health of workers and all people. It is necessary to develop regulations by public administrations to improve the protection of workers, health professionals, patients and all people in general for better occupational safety, indoor environmental quality and environmental health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrasound Imaging Advances and Research in Healthcare)
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20 pages, 7860 KiB  
Review
Lung Ultrasound in Pediatrics and Neonatology: An Update
by Angela Ammirabile, Danilo Buonsenso and Antonio Di Mauro
Healthcare 2021, 9(8), 1015; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9081015 - 7 Aug 2021
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 5770
Abstract
The potential role of ultrasound for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases is a recent field of research, because, traditionally, lungs have been considered unsuitable for ultrasonography for the high presence of air and thoracic cage that prevent a clear evaluation of the organ. [...] Read more.
The potential role of ultrasound for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases is a recent field of research, because, traditionally, lungs have been considered unsuitable for ultrasonography for the high presence of air and thoracic cage that prevent a clear evaluation of the organ. The peculiar anatomy of the pediatric chest favors the use of lung ultrasound (LUS) for the diagnosis of respiratory conditions through the interpretation of artefacts generated at the pleural surface, correlating them to disease-specific patterns. Recent studies demonstrate that LUS can be a valid alternative to chest X-rays for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases, especially in children to avoid excessive exposure to ionizing radiations. This review focuses on the description of normal and abnormal findings during LUS of the most common pediatric pathologies. Current literature demonstrates usefulness of LUS that may become a fundamental tool for the whole spectrum of lung pathologies to guide both diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrasound Imaging Advances and Research in Healthcare)
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Other

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7 pages, 736 KiB  
Case Report
Effects of Deep Dry Needling on Tremor Severity and Functionality in Stroke: A Case Report
by José Antonio Ortín, Elisabeth Bravo-Esteban, Jaime Ibáñez, Pablo Herrero, Julio Gómez-Soriano and Yolanda Marcén-Román
Healthcare 2021, 9(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9010005 - 23 Dec 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2963
Abstract
This study aimed to determine the effect of one session of dry needling on the severity of tremor, motor function and skills, and quality of life of a 39-year-old woman with post-stroke tremor. Myofascial trigger points (MTrP) of the following muscles were treated: [...] Read more.
This study aimed to determine the effect of one session of dry needling on the severity of tremor, motor function and skills, and quality of life of a 39-year-old woman with post-stroke tremor. Myofascial trigger points (MTrP) of the following muscles were treated: extensor digitorum, flexor digitorum superficialis and profundus, brachioradialis, short head of biceps brachii, long head of triceps brachii, mid deltoid, infraspinatus, teres minor, upper trapezius, and supraspinatus. Outcomes were assessed via (i) clinical scales (activity of daily living (ADL-T24), a visual analog scale (VAS), and the Archimedes spiral), (ii) a functional test (9-Hole Peg test), and (iii) biomechanical and neurophysiological measurements (inertial sensors, electromyography (EMG), and dynamometry). The subject showed a decrease in the severity of tremor during postural (72.7%) and functional (54%) tasks after treatment. EMG activity decreased after the session and returned to basal levels 4 days after. There was an improvement post-intervention (27.84 s) and 4 days after (32.43 s) in functionality and manual dexterity of the affected limb, measured with the 9-Hole Peg test, as well as in the patient’s hand and lateral pinch strength after the treatment (26.9% and 5%, respectively), that was maintained 4 days later (15.4% and 16.7%, respectively). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrasound Imaging Advances and Research in Healthcare)
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