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Innovation in Rehabilitation and Global Health

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 November 2021) | Viewed by 26190

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Physiatry and Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain
Interests: minimally invasive techniques; dry needling; percutaneous needle electrolysis; percutaneous needle neuromodulation; myofascial pain; myofascial trigger points; ultrasound guided techniques

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Guest Editor
Unit of Histology and Neurobiology, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Rovira i Virgili University, Carrer St Llorenç num 21, 43201 Reus, Spain
Interests: preclinical studies; musculoskeletal disorders; pain; pathophysiology of myofascial pain syndrome

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Guest Editor
1. MVClinic Institute, 28600 Madrid, Spain
2. Department of Physical Therapy, University CEU San Pablo, 28925 Madrid, Spain
3. Getafe C.F., 28903 Madrid, Spain
Interests: invasive physiotherapy; musculoskeletal ultrasound; percutaneous needle electrolysis; percutaneous neuromodulation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Rehabilitation covers a wide variety of disciplines and has experienced a recent revolution thanks to research development and the introduction of new techniques (i.e., minimally invasive techniques) and technology (i.e., ultrasound, tele-rehabilitation, etc.). However, the overspecialization may lead to some disadvantages, such as overdiagnosis, due to the loss of an integrated and overall health perspective. This Special Issue aims to promote research studies that allow us to improve the understanding of different innovative and personalized assessments and/or treatments, as well as their mechanisms of action, cost, adverse effects, etc. Studies with multidisciplinary approaches and involving a breakthrough in understanding innovative treatments and/or assessments are encouraged, as well as those that include global health prospects that may have a potential effect on the overall health and quality of life of the individual during all the stages of life.

Prof. Dr. Pablo Herrero Gallego
Dr. Manel Santafe
Dr. Fermín Valera Garrido
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Pain
  • Myofascial pain
  • Myofascial trigger points
  • Dry needling
  • Percutaneous needle electrolysis
  • Minimally invasive techniques
  • Tele-rehabilitation
  • Personalized rehabilitation
  • Adverse effects
  • Cost-effectiveness
  • Musculoskeletal disorders
  • Musculoskeletal ultrasound
  • Quality of life
  • Physical activity
  • Therapeutic exercise
  • Pre-clinical studies
  • Pathophysiology of myofascial pain syndrome
  • Invasive physiotherapy
  • Physical therapy
  • Percutaneous neuromodulation

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 1015 KiB  
Article
Gait Improvement in Chronic Stroke Survivors by Using an Innovative Gait Training Machine: A Randomized Controlled Trial
by Patcharee Kooncumchoo, Phuwarin Namdaeng, Somrudee Hanmanop, Bunyong Rungroungdouyboon, Kultida Klarod, Sirirat Kiatkulanusorn and Nongnuch Luangpon
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(1), 224; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19010224 - 25 Dec 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3409
Abstract
Chronic stroke leads to the impairment of lower limb function and gait performance. After in-hospital rehabilitation, most individuals lack continuous gait training because of the limited number of physical therapists. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a newly invented gait training [...] Read more.
Chronic stroke leads to the impairment of lower limb function and gait performance. After in-hospital rehabilitation, most individuals lack continuous gait training because of the limited number of physical therapists. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a newly invented gait training machine (I-Walk) on lower limb function and gait performance in chronic stroke individuals. Thirty community-dwelling chronic stroke individuals were allocated to the I-Walk machine group (n = 15) or the overground gait training (control) group (n = 15). Both groups received 30 min of upper limb and hand movement and sit-to-stand training. After that, the I-Walk group received 30 min of I-Walk training, while the control followed a 30-minute overground training program. All the individuals were trained 3 days/week for 8 weeks. The primary outcome of the motor recovery of lower limb impairment was measured using the Fugl–Meyer Assessment (FMA). The secondary outcomes for gait performance were the 6-minute walk test (6 MWT), the 10-meter walk test (10 MWT), and the Timed Up and Go (TUG). The two-way mixed-model ANOVA with the Bonferroni test was used to compare means within and between groups. The post-intervention motor and sensory subscales of the FMA significantly increased compared to the baseline in both groups. Moreover, the 6 MWT and 10 MWT values also improved in both groups. In addition, the mean difference of TUG in the I-Walk was higher than the control. The efficiency of I-Walk training was comparable to overground training and might be applied for chronic stroke gait training in the community. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation in Rehabilitation and Global Health)
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11 pages, 1136 KiB  
Article
Is Instrumental Compression Equally Effective and Comfortable for Physiotherapists and Physiotherapy Students than Manual Compression? A Comparative Cross-Sectional Study
by Sara Pérez-Palomares, Carolina Jiménez-Sánchez, Ignacio Serrano-Herrero, Pablo Herrero and Sandra Calvo
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(22), 12121; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182212121 - 18 Nov 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1888
Abstract
The objective of this work is to compare the homogeneity of instrumental and manual compression during the simulation of a pressure release technique, measured with a dynamometer, as well as to evaluate the comparative degree of comfort by physiotherapists and physiotherapy students when [...] Read more.
The objective of this work is to compare the homogeneity of instrumental and manual compression during the simulation of a pressure release technique, measured with a dynamometer, as well as to evaluate the comparative degree of comfort by physiotherapists and physiotherapy students when performing this technique. Methods: A comparative cross-sectional study was carried out with physiotherapists (lecturers with clinical experience) and 4th year students of the Physiotherapy Degree at Universidad San Jorge. The amount of pressure performed and how it was maintained during 80 s with both techniques was analysed using a digital dynamometer. The degree of comfort was evaluated using a modified numeric rating scale, with higher values representing a higher degree of discomfort. Results: A total of 30 subjects participated. Significant differences were found between the techniques in terms of maintaining a constant pressure level for 80 s (p = 0.043). A statistically significant difference was found between both techniques in the period from 45 to 80 s. Regarding the degree of discomfort, the value obtained from the students’ responses was 4.67 (1.35) for the manual technique and 1.93 (0.88) for the instrumental technique. In the case of physiotherapists, the comfort was 4.87 (2.13) for the manual technique and 3.33 (1.54) for the instrumental technique. Conclusion: The sustained manual compression necessary in manual pressure release techniques in the treatment of myofascial trigger points can be performed with assistive tools that guarantee a uniform compression maintained throughout the development of the technique and are more comfortable for physiotherapists. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation in Rehabilitation and Global Health)
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11 pages, 12122 KiB  
Article
Immediate Effects of Acupuncture on Explosive Force Production and Stiffness in Male Knee Joint
by Jun Wang, I-Lin Wang, Rui Hu, Shun Yao, Yu Su, Shu Zhou and Che-Hsiu Chen
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(18), 9518; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18189518 - 9 Sep 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2685
Abstract
Acupuncture can improve explosive force production and affect joint stiffness by affecting muscle activation levels. This study aims to explore the effects of true acupuncture (TA) compared with sham acupuncture (SA) on the explosive force production and stiffness of the knee joint in [...] Read more.
Acupuncture can improve explosive force production and affect joint stiffness by affecting muscle activation levels. This study aims to explore the effects of true acupuncture (TA) compared with sham acupuncture (SA) on the explosive force production and stiffness of the knee joint in healthy male subjects. Twenty subjects were randomly divided into the TA group (n = 10) and SA group (n = 10) to complete isokinetic movement of the right knee joint at a speed of 240°/s before and after acupuncture. Futu (ST32), Liangqiu (ST34), Zusanli (ST36), Xuehai (SP10), and Chengshan (BL57) were selected for acupuncture. The intervention of SA is that needles with a blunt tip were pushed against the skin, giving an illusion of insertion. The results showed that acupuncture and the intervention time had a significant interaction effect on knee joint explosive force and joint stiffness (p < 0.05). The average maximum (max) torque, average work, average power, average peak power and total work of the TA group increased significantly after acupuncture (p < 0.05), while the SA group did not (p > 0.05). Therefore, true acupuncture can immediately improve the explosive force and joint stiffness of the male knee joint by inducing post-activation potentiation (PAP) and/or De-Qi. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation in Rehabilitation and Global Health)
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12 pages, 1458 KiB  
Article
Fascial Manipulation Technique in the Conservative Management of Morton’s Syndrome: A Pilot Study
by Carlo Biz, Carla Stecco, Ilaria Fantoni, Gianluca Aprile, Stefano Giacomini, Carmelo Pirri and Pietro Ruggieri
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 7952; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18157952 - 27 Jul 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2634
Abstract
Background and Objective: Morton’s syndrome (MS) is a common cause of neuropathic chronic forefoot pain, characterised by the development of a swelling of the common digital plantar nerve, whose aetiology is not fully known. There is currently no gold standard of treatment; nonoperative [...] Read more.
Background and Objective: Morton’s syndrome (MS) is a common cause of neuropathic chronic forefoot pain, characterised by the development of a swelling of the common digital plantar nerve, whose aetiology is not fully known. There is currently no gold standard of treatment; nonoperative management commonly involves manual therapies, orthoses therapy and infiltrative techniques, while surgery is indicated after failure of conservative measures. The present preliminary study prospectively evaluates patients affected by MS treated by Fascial Manipulation technique (FM), a noninvasive manual therapy, focused on the release of the deep fascia, reducing its stiffness. Materials and Methods: Patients with clinical and sonographic diagnosis of MS with at least a 4-month history of neuropathic symptoms underwent a cycle of three weekly FM sessions. Clinical follow-up, including VAS and AOFAS scores, was performed 21 days (T1) and 3 months (T2) after treatment. Results: Nine patients, among 28 recruited initially, completed the manual therapy sessions and relative follow-up points. This noninvasive pain treatment led to significant improvement of VAS (p = 0.0034) and AOFAS scores (p = 0.0240) at the first follow-up (T1). At 3-month follow-up (T2), both scores decreased slightly, remaining however superior to the pre-treatment values. Only VAS was still significant (p = 0.0184). Conclusions: Despite the small size of the case series, this pilot study is unique in supporting Fascial Manipulation in the nonoperative treatment of MS. Further studies are needed with a large cohort of gender balanced patients to confirm the encouraging results obtained. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation in Rehabilitation and Global Health)
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18 pages, 1645 KiB  
Article
Immediate Effects of Dry Needling on the Autonomic Nervous System and Mechanical Hyperalgesia: A Randomized Controlled Trial
by Irene Lázaro-Navas, Cristina Lorenzo-Sánchez-Aguilera, Daniel Pecos-Martín, Jose Jesús Jiménez-Rejano, Marcos Jose Navarro-Santana, Josué Fernández-Carnero and Tomás Gallego-Izquierdo
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 6018; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18116018 - 3 Jun 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 4203
Abstract
Background: Dry needling (DN) is often used for the treatment of muscle pain among physiotherapists. However, little is known about the mechanisms of action by which its effects are generated. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to determine if the use [...] Read more.
Background: Dry needling (DN) is often used for the treatment of muscle pain among physiotherapists. However, little is known about the mechanisms of action by which its effects are generated. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to determine if the use of DN in healthy subjects activates the sympathetic nervous system, thus resulting in a decrease in pain caused by stress. Methods: Sixty-five healthy volunteer subjects were recruited from the University of Alcala, Madrid, Spain, with an age of 27.78 (SD = 8.41) years. The participants were randomly assigned to participate in a group with deep DN in the adductor pollicis muscle or a placebo needling group. The autonomic nervous system was evaluated, in addition to local and remote mechanical hyperalgesia. Results: In a comparison of the moment at which the needling intervention was carried out with the baseline, the heart rate of the dry needling group significantly increased by 20.60% (SE = 2.88), whereas that of the placebo group increased by 5.33% (SE = 2.32) (p = 0.001, d = 1.02). The pressure pain threshold showed significant differences between both groups, being significantly higher in the needling group (adductor muscle p = 0.001; d = 0.85; anterior tibialis muscle p = 0.022, d = 0.58). Conclusions: This work appears to indicate that dry needling produces an immediate activation in the sympathetic nervous system, improving local and distant mechanical hyperalgesia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation in Rehabilitation and Global Health)
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13 pages, 1783 KiB  
Article
The Influence of Verbal Suggestion on Post-Needling Soreness and Pain Processing after Dry Needling Treatment: An Experimental Study
by Eleuterio A. Sánchez Romero, Tifanny Lim, Jorge Hugo Villafañe, Gurvan Boutin, Victor Riquelme Aguado, Aitor Martin Pintado-Zugasti, José Luis Alonso Pérez and Josué Fernández Carnero
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 4206; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18084206 - 15 Apr 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3225
Abstract
Background: It remains unclear as to whether verbal suggestions and expectancies can influence the perception of post-needling soreness. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of verbal suggestions on post-needling soreness after dry needling of the trapezius muscle. Methods: This [...] Read more.
Background: It remains unclear as to whether verbal suggestions and expectancies can influence the perception of post-needling soreness. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of verbal suggestions on post-needling soreness after dry needling of the trapezius muscle. Methods: This study is a randomized controlled trial including healthy subjects randomly assigned to one of three groups receiving different verbal suggestions about the effects of dry needling and the occurrence of post needling soreness (positive, negative, or neutral). Then, dry needling on a latent trigger point of the upper trapezius muscle was performed and the following outcomes were measured immediately after, 24, 48, and 72 h, and one week after the intervention: post-needling soreness intensity, pressure pain threshold (PPT), temporal summation (TS) and conditioned pain modulation (CPM). Results: Seventy-three consecutive participants were screened and 42 participants (12 men and 30 women, aged: 24 ± 8 years old) were eligible and finished the study protocol. The results showed that verbal suggestion did not influence the perception of post-needling soreness, since there were no differences between groups (p < 0.05) on the intensity of post-needling soreness or tenderness over a one-week follow-up. Moreover, verbal suggestion did not associate with changes in sensorimotor variables of TS and CPM. Conclusions: The induction of different types of expectations through verbal suggestion does not influence the perception of acute pain perceived during the performance of a deep dry needling technique and post-needling pain or soreness after deep dry needling on a latent upper trapezius myofascial trigger point (MTrP). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation in Rehabilitation and Global Health)
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6 pages, 638 KiB  
Article
Effects of Ischemic Compression on Trigger Points in the First Dorsal Interosseous Muscle in Patients with Thumb Carpometacarpal Osteoarthritis
by María Pilar López-Royo, Paolo Pedersini, Raquel Cantero-Téllez, Kristin Valdes, Víctor Doménech-García, Pablo Herrero and Jorge Hugo Villafañe
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 2961; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18062961 - 14 Mar 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3919
Abstract
Background: Thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis (CMC OA) is a common disorder that interferes with the ability to perform the activities of daily life. The purpose of this study was to investigate the immediate effects of ischemic compression on myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in the [...] Read more.
Background: Thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis (CMC OA) is a common disorder that interferes with the ability to perform the activities of daily life. The purpose of this study was to investigate the immediate effects of ischemic compression on myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle in patients with the diagnosis of thumb CMC OA. Methods: In a quasi-experimental clinical trial, thirty-one patients, 87% female (age: 82 ± 9.4 years), with thumb CMC OA, were consecutively assigned to either an experimental treatment that included the ischemic compression of the FDI MTrP or a sham treatment of the FDI MTrP for one session. The main outcome considered in the study was the pressure pain threshold (PPT). Measurements were taken pre- and post-treatment and at a 1-week follow-up period. Results: The PPT over the right (affected) FDI muscle showed statistically significant differences between groups at 1-week follow up (F = 3.518; p = 0.04) in favor of the experimental group. Conclusions: The ischemic compression of FDI-MTrPs is an appropriate part of a multimodal treatment to decrease local pain sensitivity in patients with CMC OA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation in Rehabilitation and Global Health)
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8 pages, 1481 KiB  
Article
Ultrasound Imaging Evaluation of Textural Features in Athletes with Soleus Pathology—A Novel Case-Control Study
by Blanca De-la-Cruz-Torres, Emmanuel Navarro-Flores, Daniel López-López and Carlos Romero-Morales
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1983; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041983 - 18 Feb 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2465
Abstract
Background: the aim of this study was to compare the echotexture of patients with soleus muscle injury and age matched controls. Methods: a sample of 62 athletes was recruited at the private clinic and was divided in two group: a healthy group (n [...] Read more.
Background: the aim of this study was to compare the echotexture of patients with soleus muscle injury and age matched controls. Methods: a sample of 62 athletes was recruited at the private clinic and was divided in two group: a healthy group (n = 31) and a soleus pathology group whose athletes had soleus muscle injury, located in the central tendon (n = 31). The muscle thickness (MTh), echointensity (EI) and echovariation (EV) were analyzed. An intra-rater reliability test (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient-ICC) was performed in order to analyze the reliability of the values of the measurements. Results: Sociodemographic variables did not show statistically significant differences (p > 0.05). Ultrasound imaging measurements who reported statistically significant differences were EI (p = 0.001) and standard deviation (SD) (p = 0.001). MTh and EV variables did not show statistically significant differences (p = 0.381 and p = 0.364, respectively). Moreover, reliability values for the MTh (ICC = 0.911), EI (ICC = 0.982), SD (ICC = 0.955) and EV (ICC = 0.963). Based on these results the intra-rater reliability was considered excellent. Conclusion: Athletes with a central tendon injury of soleus muscle showed a lower EI when they were compared to healthy athletes. The echogenicity showed by the quantitative ultrasound imaging measurement may be a more objective parameter for the diagnosis and follow-up the soleus muscle injuries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation in Rehabilitation and Global Health)
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