Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Chronic Care".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 4250

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Physiotherapy, Occupational Therapy, Rehabilitation and Physical Medicine, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, 28922 Madrid, Spain
Interests: pain; chronic pain; rehabilitation; exercise therapy; manual therapy; electromyography; measurement properties; applied kinesiology
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Co-Guest Editor
Motor Science Institute, Federal University of Alfenas, Alfenas 37133-840, Brazil
Interests: headache; postural control; musculoskeletal disorders; pain; rehabilitation; temporomandibular disorders

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Co-Guest Editor
Institute of Health Sciences, Department of Physiotherapy, University of Luebeck, 23562 Luebeck, Germany
Interests: musculoskeletal pain; headache disorders; chronic pain assessment and management; vestibular symptoms; gait and balance analysis; physiotherapy interventions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We invite you to contribute to our Special Issue, “Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation”, which aims to enhance evidence about the assessment and treatment strategies addressed to musculoskeletal conditions and its repercussions on patients’ lives.

Musculoskeletal disorders are among the most disabling conditions worldwide. It is generally related to chronic conditions that affects sensorial, physical, and social dimensions. This Special Issue welcomes well-designed and good-quality studies about musculoskeletal disorders, their impact, and treatment. We also welcome studies related to musculoskeletal function and the measurement properties of the instruments used in their assessment are important because it would help us to trust in the data obtained during our assessment and to rationalize the treatment approach. Studies using quantitative, qualitative, mixed-methods or systematic reviews with or without metanalysis are considered. 

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.

Prof. Dr. Lidiane L. Florencio
Guest Editor

Prof. Dr. Carina Ferreira Pinheiro-Araujo
Prof. Dr. Gabriela Ferreira Carvalho
Co-Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • rehabilitation
  • exercise therapy
  • manual therapy
  • measurement properties
  • applied kinesiology
  • pain
  • chronic pain

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 1256 KiB  
Article
Effects of Peroneus Brevis versus Peroneus Longus Muscle Training on Muscle Function in Chronic Ankle Instability: A Randomized Controlled Trial
by Dukhan Ko, Yongchul Choi and Kyujin Lee
Healthcare 2024, 12(5), 547; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12050547 - 26 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1047
Abstract
Chronic ankle instability (CAI) is a common injury that can occur in daily life or sporting events. Injuries to the anterior talofibular, posterior talofibular, and calcaneofibular ligaments are common, and the core of rehabilitation training involves strengthening the peroneus muscle. Many studies on [...] Read more.
Chronic ankle instability (CAI) is a common injury that can occur in daily life or sporting events. Injuries to the anterior talofibular, posterior talofibular, and calcaneofibular ligaments are common, and the core of rehabilitation training involves strengthening the peroneus muscle. Many studies on rehabilitation training have focused on strengthening the peroneus brevis muscle, and few studies have focused on specific training to strengthen the peroneus longus muscle. Therefore, this study aims to investigate changes in the symptoms and functions of patients by applying training to strengthen the peroneus longus and peroneus brevis muscles. Home-based training and mobile monitoring were utilized for 12 weeks, divided into peroneus brevis training (PBT) and peroneus longus training (PLT), in 52 adult males with CAI. Participation was voluntary, with enrollment done through a bulletin board, and intervention training allocation was randomly assigned and conducted in a double-blind manner. This study was registered as a trial protocol (KCT 0008478). Foot and ankle outcome scores (FAOS), isokinetic ankle strength tests, and Y-balance tests were performed before and after the intervention. Both PLT and PBT significantly improved in FAOS, inversion, and eversion at angular velocities of 30°/s and 120°/s and in the anterior and posterolateral directions of the Y-balance test (p < 0.05). Interaction effects by time and group were not significant for the FAOS (p > 0.05). However, PLT improved eversion muscle strength and muscle power to a greater degree, compared with PBT, in the anterior and posterolateral directions of the Y-balance test (p < 0.05). In conclusion, both PLT and PBT were effective for CAI patients; in addition, PLT had greater potential for improving strength and balance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation)
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10 pages, 652 KiB  
Article
Reference Values for Cervical Muscle Strength in Healthy Women Using a Hand-Held Dynamometer and the Association with Age and Anthropometric Variables
by Camila Gorla, Taís de Souza Martins, Lidiane Lima Florencio, Carina Ferreira Pinheiro-Araújo, César Fernández-de-las-Peñas, Jaqueline Martins and Débora Bevilaqua-Grossi
Healthcare 2023, 11(16), 2278; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11162278 - 12 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 759
Abstract
Knowledge of reference values for cervical muscle strength is a key tool for clinicians to use as a clinical reference measure and to establish goals during rehabilitation. The objective was to establish reference values for the maximal strength of cervical muscles in healthy [...] Read more.
Knowledge of reference values for cervical muscle strength is a key tool for clinicians to use as a clinical reference measure and to establish goals during rehabilitation. The objective was to establish reference values for the maximal strength of cervical muscles in healthy women using a handheld dynamometer and verify the association of cervical muscle strength with age and anthropometric measurements. A hundred women were classified into four groups (n = 25) according to age: 18–29 years, 30–39 years, 40–49 years, and 50–60 years. Maximal muscle strength of the cervical spine was measured using a Lafayette® handheld dynamometer for flexion, extension, and bilateral lateral flexion. No differences in cervical muscle strength were observed among the groups (p > 0.05). However, the 18–29-year-old group took less time to reach the peak of force for flexion than the 50–60-year-old group. Moderate correlations were observed between cervical flexor strength and weight, body mass index, and neck circumference, and between cervical extensor strength and weight and body mass index (r = 0.43–0.55; p < 0.05). Reference values for cervical muscle strength in healthy women were established using a handheld dynamometer, and the association between muscle strength and anthropometric data was moderate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation)
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Review

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15 pages, 992 KiB  
Review
Effects of Ankle Orthoses, Taping, and Insoles on Postural Stability of Individuals with Chronic Ankle Instability: A Systematic Review
by Yunqi Tang, Peiyao Liang, Jingwen Pan, Cui Zhang, Hui Ren, Shizhe Cheng and Pui Wah Kong
Healthcare 2023, 11(18), 2570; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11182570 - 18 Sep 2023
Viewed by 2005
Abstract
Chronic ankle instability (CAI) is a prevalent condition characterized by recurring instances of the ankle giving way and persistent symptoms, including pain and diminished function. Foot and ankle external supports are commonly used in clinical practice and research for treating CAI. This systematic [...] Read more.
Chronic ankle instability (CAI) is a prevalent condition characterized by recurring instances of the ankle giving way and persistent symptoms, including pain and diminished function. Foot and ankle external supports are commonly used in clinical practice and research for treating CAI. This systematic review aimed to assess the effects of foot and ankle external supports on the postural stability of individuals with CAI to guide clinical practice and inform future research. A comprehensive search was conducted in PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases from 1 January 2012 to 1 November 2022. Eighteen studies involving individuals with CAI were chosen in this systematic review. The quality of the included studies and risk of bias were assessed using Cochrane Collaboration’s tool for randomized controlled trials, the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale for case–control studies, and the DELPHl-list for crossover trial studies. The external supports included in this review were ankle orthoses (elastic, semi-rigid, and active orthoses), taping (kinesiotaping and fibular reposition taping), and insoles (textured and supportive insoles). The outcome measures included static and dynamic postural stability tests, such as the single-leg stance test, star excursion balance test, Y-balance test, single-leg landing test, lateral jump test, walking test, and running test. The results showed that elastic orthoses, Kinesiotaping, and textured insoles demonstrated potential benefits in improving postural stability in individuals with CAI. Elastic orthoses decreased ankle joint motion variability, kinesiotaping facilitated cutaneous receptors and proprioceptive feedback, while textured insoles increased tactile stimulation and foot position awareness. However, the effects of semi-rigid orthoses, fibular reposition taping, and arch support insoles were inconsistent across studies. Future research should explore the long-term effects of these external supports, analyze the effects of different characteristics and combinations of supports, and employ standardized outcome measures and testing protocols for assessing postural stability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation)
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