Advances in Vegetation Succession with Soil Erosion

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Soil".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 1154

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
College of Forestry, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025, China
Interests: soil erosion; soil and water conservation; soil hydrology; underground leakage; rainfall runoff; nutrient loss; karst hydrology; rock soil interface; rocky desertification
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Forestry, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025, China
Interests: soil erosion; soil and water conservation; soil hydrology; underground leakage; rainfall runoff; nutrient loss; karst hydrology; rocky desertification; ecological restoration
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Soil erosion can lead to the loss of soil resources and the destruction of land resources, which is an ecological stress that affects vegetation development and is affected by vegetation reactions. Its long-term effect changes the topography and soil characteristics and to some extent determines the development of vegetation. On the contrary, surface vegetation is also an important factor in reducing soil erosion, which has received great and widespread attention. Therefore, the relationship between vegetation succession and soil erosion has attracted considerable attention due to its important scientific significance and practical application value. In this context, this Special Issue attempts to document the latest ideas on vegetation succession research in the presence of soil erosion, providing new insights into some of these themes at the level of the relationship between vegetation succession and soil erosion. 

Potential topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Soil erosion and spatial distribution pattern of vegetation;
  • Erosion-resistant plants and their community characteristics;
  • Vegetation degradation mechanism and ecological restoration in soil erosion areas;
  • Characteristics of vegetation community and its effect on soil and water conservation;
  • Soil anti-scourability during vegetation succession;
  • The effect of soil erosion on vegetation succession process;
  • Vegetation community restoration succession and slope erosion sediment yield.

Dr. Xudong Peng
Prof. Dr. Quanhou Dai
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • vegetation succession
  • soil erosion
  • vegetation succession of abandoned farmland
  • rocky desertification
  • vegetation restoration
  • soil factor

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 4423 KiB  
Article
Restoration Strategies in the Heidaigou Open-Pit Mine Dump Based on Water Sources and Plant Water Utilization
by Jing Wang, Long Li, Liang Zhang, Qiang Li and Kun Liu
Forests 2024, 15(6), 906; https://doi.org/10.3390/f15060906 - 23 May 2024
Viewed by 264
Abstract
In this study, three typical plants capable of restoring in the Heidaigou open-pit mine dump, namely, Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica, Caragana korshinskii, and Medicago sativa, were taken as the research objects. The δ2H and δ18O values [...] Read more.
In this study, three typical plants capable of restoring in the Heidaigou open-pit mine dump, namely, Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica, Caragana korshinskii, and Medicago sativa, were taken as the research objects. The δ2H and δ18O values of atmospheric precipitation, soil water, stem water, and leaf water were measured using the stable isotope technique, and the distribution characteristics of the δ2H and δ18O values of different water sources were identified. The IsoSource model (version1.3.1) was used to calculate the contribution rate of different water sources to the plants, and the differences and dynamic changes in the water sources for P. sylvestris var. mongolica, C. korshinskii, and M. sativa during the rainy season were examined. Results showed that the water source of the three plants was found to be mainly soil water, and the utilization of each potential water source varied in different periods of the rainy season. In June, when SWC was sufficient, P. sylvestris var. mongolica and M. sativa primarily absorbed and utilized shallow and middle soil water, with relative utilization ratios of 55.5% and 59%, respectively, while C. korshinskii has a more balanced utilization ratio of soil water in each layer, with shallow soil water utilization at 33.7%, middle soil water at 34.2%, and deep soil water at 32.2%. In August, when SWC decreased, P. sylvestris var. mongolica, C. korshinskii, and M. sativa were all transferred to deep soil water, with utilization ratios of 75.8%, 78.8%, and 71.1%, respectively. The values showed that these three typical plants are capable of restoring can respond to external water changes through the plastic transformation of water absorption sources. Among them, C. korshinskii can flexibly use soil water in each layer, has stronger survival competitiveness in drought, and can better adapt to the fragile ecological environment of a mining dump. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Vegetation Succession with Soil Erosion)
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18 pages, 3865 KiB  
Article
Response of the Stability of Soil Aggregates and Erodibility to Land Use Patterns in Wetland Ecosystems of Karst Plateau
by Longpei Cen, Xudong Peng and Quanhou Dai
Forests 2024, 15(4), 599; https://doi.org/10.3390/f15040599 - 26 Mar 2024
Viewed by 646
Abstract
The world’s natural wetlands, which have important ecological functions, are being lost at an alarming rate. The erosion and deposition of soil on wetlands is a major cause of wetland conversion to agriculture. An urgent problem to be solved is how to slow [...] Read more.
The world’s natural wetlands, which have important ecological functions, are being lost at an alarming rate. The erosion and deposition of soil on wetlands is a major cause of wetland conversion to agriculture. An urgent problem to be solved is how to slow down the erosion and deposition of wetlands resulting from land use. Land use patterns affect soil properties, thereby affecting soil aggregate stability and erodibility. Evaluating the effects of land use patterns on soil aggregate stability and erodibility in small watersheds of wetland ecosystems of karst plateau is of great importance. Thus, we compared the soil properties, aggregate stability indicators and soil erodibility of shrubland, grassland, artificial forest land and sloping farmland for evaluating the impact of various land use patterns on soil aggregate stability and erodibility in typical karst plateau wetland ecosystems. Our results showed that the mass fraction of soil aggregates > 0.25 mm was the main component in the four land uses, with greater variation in aggregates > 5 mm; overall, MWD, GMD and WSA0.25 were higher in grassland and shrubland than in sloping farmland and artificial forest land, while K values, PAD and SCAI showed the opposite trend. Correlation analysis showed that effective soil nutrients had a positive effect on soil aggregate stability. In conclusion, the stability of soil aggregates and resistance to soil erosion were strongest under the influence of shrubland. Our study showed that shrubland can better improve soil aggregate stability and erosion resistance, which may provide a guide for protecting and restoring karst plateau wetland ecosystems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Vegetation Succession with Soil Erosion)
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