Carbon Sequestration and Stability, and Soil Erosion in Forest Ecosystem

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Soil".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 2051

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Forestry, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, China
Interests: forest ecology; ecosystem carbon cycle

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Huanjiang Observation and Research Station for Karst Ecosystems, Huanjiang, China
Interests: soil fertility; landscape ecology; vegetation recovery

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Breeding Base for State Key Laboratory of Land Degradation and Ecological Restoration in Northwest China, Ningxia University, Yinchuan 750021, China
Interests: plant ( community ) ecology; microbial ecology; global change ecology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The pool of soil organic carbon is an important source and sink of atmospheric CO2, and it is one of the most important factors in carbon cycling and functioning. The stability of soil carbon is another factor that controls soil carbon emissions and storage. Stable soil carbon can enhance soil carbon sequestration and increase its mean residence time. Given that soil carbon stability influences carbon emission and storage, and greatly contributes to soil nutrients and quality, an accurate estimation of soil carbon stock and its stability may have important implications for predicting climate change and maintaining ecological sustainability. This Special Issue aims to determine plant, soil, and ecosystem carbon storage and soil C stability changes in forest ecosystems, and to identify key factors that best explain carbon storage and stability changes.

Studies focusing on global change (such as warming, drought, etc.), forest management (such as forest thinning, fertilization, and nitrogen and phosphorus addition, etc.), succession, vegetation restoration, greenhouse experiments, field experiments, litter decomposition, soil microbial activity, soil animal, soil carbon, and soil erosion are welcome in this Special Issue.

Dr. Hongwei Xu
Dr. Jun Xiao
Dr. Danbo Pang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • forest ecosystems
  • forest management
  • global change
  • vegetation restoration
  • carbon cycling
  • carbon stability
  • soil physical property
  • soil biodiversity
  • soil erosion
  • plant diversity

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

11 pages, 2481 KiB  
Article
Nitrogen Addition Promotes the Accumulation of Soil Particulate Organic Carbon in a Subtropical Forest
by Jingqi Chen, Qiufang Zhang, Hui Dai, Jiguang Feng, Quanxin Zeng, Xueqi Sun, Yuanzhen Peng, Wenwei Chen, Biao Zhu and Yuehmin Chen
Forests 2024, 15(4), 619; https://doi.org/10.3390/f15040619 - 28 Mar 2024
Viewed by 697
Abstract
Nitrogen (N) deposition rates of terrestrial ecosystems have gradually declined but are still high in some areas. Previous studies have reported that N addition elicits diverse impacts on soil organic carbon (SOC) pools. SOC can be divided into different functional fractions, namely, particulate [...] Read more.
Nitrogen (N) deposition rates of terrestrial ecosystems have gradually declined but are still high in some areas. Previous studies have reported that N addition elicits diverse impacts on soil organic carbon (SOC) pools. SOC can be divided into different functional fractions, namely, particulate organic carbon (POC) and mineral-associated organic carbon (MAOC). The responses of these fractions to N addition should be elucidated to better understand the changes in SOC pools. Here, we conducted a N addition experiment (0, 40, and 80 kg N ha−1 yr−1) in a subtropical Castanopsis fabri forest to simulate N deposition. The surface (0−10 cm) SOC fractions, aboveground litter product, fine root (diameter < 2 mm) biomass, soil exchangeable cation content, and soil enzyme activity under different N addition treatments were measured. The results showed the following: (1) N addition showed a positive effect on POC and SOC contents but did not significantly affect MAOC content; (2) POC content was negatively correlated with pH and soil enzyme activity and positively correlated with aboveground litter product, suggesting that POC accumulation was influenced by aboveground litter input and microbial decomposition; (3) a close negative relationship was observed between exchangeable Al3+ and Ca2+ or K+ contents, indicating that there is likely to be a trade-off between the mineral sorption and desorption, thus resulting in an insignificant reaction of MAOC to N addition. Overall, the accumulation of SOC under short-term N addition was found to be primarily driven by POC, and the response of different SOC functional fractions to N addition was inconsistent. By incorporating these nuances into ecosystem models, it is possible to predict SOC dynamics more accurately in response to global change. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

21 pages, 3361 KiB  
Article
The Seasonal Impact of Thinning Intensities on Soil Carbon Cycling in the Lesser Xing’an Range, Northeast China
by Baoshan Zhang, Ran Gao and Xibin Dong
Forests 2024, 15(3), 449; https://doi.org/10.3390/f15030449 - 27 Feb 2024
Viewed by 902
Abstract
Forest degradation, driven by human and natural factors, diminishes ecological functions and carbon storage. Understanding the complex dynamics of soil carbon pools is crucial for the global carbon cycle, although these dynamics are poorly understood. This study examines how different thinning intensities influence [...] Read more.
Forest degradation, driven by human and natural factors, diminishes ecological functions and carbon storage. Understanding the complex dynamics of soil carbon pools is crucial for the global carbon cycle, although these dynamics are poorly understood. This study examines how different thinning intensities influence seasonal soil carbon cycling in degraded forests. ANOVA revealed significant differences in soil properties across treatments (p < 0.05). Redundancy analysis and random forest analyses were used to explore relationships among thinning intensities, soil properties, and carbon sequestration. Thinning significantly altered soil attributes, as revealed by field experiments and data analysis. Moderate thinning (20% intensity) significantly enhanced litter retention and soil nutrient levels year-round (p < 0.05). Seasonal variations affected soil carbon dynamics and lower thinning intensities improved carbon sequestration in spring and summer. Conversely, higher thinning intensities led to carbon loss in autumn and winter. Litter carbon, fine root carbon, and correction factor significantly respond to thinning intensities year-round as examined through redundancy analysis and random forest analyses. Findings indicate moderate thinning effectively enhances soil carbon sequestration in degraded forests. Strategically planned thinning could aid climate change mitigation by boosting forest soil carbon storage, influencing forest management and conservation. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop