Soil Organic Carbon and Nutrient Cycling in the Forest Ecosystems

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Soil".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 1072

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Forestry, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004, China
Interests: soil microbial diversity; soil nutrient cycling; soil aggregate turnover

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Guangxi Key Laboratory of Plant Conservation and Restoration Ecology in Karst Terrain, Guangxi Institute of Botany, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region and Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guilin 541006, China
Interests: biodiversity; ecosystem structure and function; restoration ecology

E-Mail
Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Subtropical Silviculture, Zhejiang A & F University, Hangzhou 311300, China
Interests: global change ecology; soil C and N cycling; forest ecology
School of Geographical Sciences, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715, China
Interests: soil organic carbon sequestration; soil organic carbon stabilization; soil fertility and nutrient cycling; soil erosion and land degradation; soil aggregates; land use change; soil quality
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As the main component of terrestrial ecosystems, forest plays an important ecological service function. Forest soil stores a large amount of organic carbon, and the effective use of its carbon sink capacity is conducive to the realization of carbon neutrality. At the same time, the nutrient cycle of forest soil is accompanied by the energy flow, which determines the health and development of forest ecosystems. Due to the complexity of subsurface processes and the limitation of field observation, the study of forest soil processes has long been a difficult as well as an advanced field in forest ecology. 

Therefore, this Special Issue aims to bring together important research on soil organic carbon and nutrient cycling in forest ecosystems, including (1) the mechanism of soil organic carbon and nutrient cycling influenced by plant traits and their diversity; (2) the interaction of soil organic carbon and nutrient cycling with root secretions, rhizosphere microorganisms, and litter quality; (3) and the response of soil organic carbon and nutrient cycling to anthropogenic or natural disturbances.

Dr. Shengqiang Wang
Prof. Dr. Yili Guo
Dr. Qiqian Wu
Dr. Pujia Yu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • soil organic carbon
  • soil nutrients
  • soil stoichiometry
  • soil fertility
  • soil ecology

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

18 pages, 3745 KiB  
Article
Eleven-Year Canopy Nitrogen Addition Enhances the Uptake of Phosphorus by Plants and Accelerates Its Depletion in Soil
by Xiaoli Gao, Yinmei Gao, Xiaowei Li, Chenlu Zhang, Quanxin Zeng, Xiaochun Yuan, Yuehmin Chen, Yuanchun Yu and Shenglei Fu
Forests 2024, 15(3), 416; https://doi.org/10.3390/f15030416 - 22 Feb 2024
Viewed by 870
Abstract
Soil phosphorus (P) is a critical factor that limits plant productivity. Enhanced nitrogen (N) deposition has the potential to modify P transformation and availability, thereby potentially affecting the long-term productivity of forests. Here, we conducted an 11-year-long field experiment to simulate N deposition [...] Read more.
Soil phosphorus (P) is a critical factor that limits plant productivity. Enhanced nitrogen (N) deposition has the potential to modify P transformation and availability, thereby potentially affecting the long-term productivity of forests. Here, we conducted an 11-year-long field experiment to simulate N deposition by adding N to the forest canopy in a N-limited northern subtropical forest in central China and assessed the changes in soil organic P mineralization, P fractions, microbial biomass P content, phosphatase activity, and plant P content under N deposition. Our objective was to establish a theoretical framework for addressing the P supply and sustaining plant productivity in soils with low P availability, particularly in a changing global setting. The results demonstrated a substantial reduction in the levels of total, organic, and available P owing to the canopy addition of N. Furthermore, there was a marked decrease in the proportion of organic P in the total P pool. However, no substantial changes were observed in the soil inorganic P content or the proportion of inorganic P within the total P across different treatments. Canopy N addition significantly enhanced the microbial biomass P content, phosphatase activity, and organic P mineralization rate, suggesting that in soils with limited P availability, the primary source of P was derived from the mineralization of organic P. Canopy N addition substantially increased the P content in leaves and fine roots while concurrently causing a considerable decrease in the N:P ratio. This indicates that N deposition increases P demand in plants. Correlation analysis revealed a significant negative association among the total, organic, and available P levels in the soil and plant P concentrations (p < 0.05). This suggests that the primary cause of the reduced fractions of P was plant uptake following canopy N addition. Various studies have demonstrated that N deposition induces an augmented P demand in plants and expedites the utilization of available P. A substantial reduction in potentially accessible soil P caused by N deposition is likely to exacerbate regional P depletion, thereby exerting adverse impacts on forest ecosystem productivity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soil Organic Carbon and Nutrient Cycling in the Forest Ecosystems)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop