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Carbon Dioxide Capture, Utilization and Storage (CCUS) Ⅱ

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "B3: Carbon Emission and Utilization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2024) | Viewed by 3483

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150006, China
Interests: carbon dioxide capture, utilization and storage (CCUS); hydrogen production from biomass with high-efficiency and clean energy (hydrogen energy); efficient use of solar energy (nano photocatalysis); construction and application of functional carbon (optical-electric-magnetic-energy storage); micro-nano mesoscopic scale reaction simulation and control (computational simulation)
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
School of Energy and Mechanical Engineering, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210042, China
Interests: synthesis solid sorbent for CO2 capture; thermocatalytic and photocatalytic CO2 reduction; catalytic hydrogenation of CO2; redox cycle and calcium looping for thermochemical energy storage (TCES); low corbon energy synthesis; pollutant control from fossil energy utilization
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001, China
Interests: clean use of fossil energy; preparation of carbon-based functional materials; intelligent diagnosis of equipment burning natural gas; mixing hydrogen and ammonia; mechanism of action of metallic substances in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon pyrolysis/carbon sooting process
School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001, China
Interests: carbon dioxide capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS); development of biochar-based functional materials; efficient prevention and control of pollutants

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Currently, increasing anthropogenic emissions of CO2 are identified as the major driver of global warming. Carbon dioxide capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) technology is broadly recognised as one of the near-term to mid-term solutions, which plays a key role with respect to climate change mitigation.

This Special Issue titled “Carbon Dioxide Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS)” invites articles that address state-of-the-art technologies and new developments for CCUS, including but not limited to precombustion carbon capture, post-combustion carbon capture, oxy-fuel or chemical looping combustion, CO2 conversion to generate synthetic fuels, biomass thermal conversion, CO2 storage, BECCUS, and other negative emission technologies. Articles that engage with the latest research topics with respect to CCUS are particularly encouraged, such as direct air capture, electrochemical and thermochemical CO2 catalytic reduction, biological conversion of CO2, etc. Moreover, articles that discuss and drive the research directions of CCUS would be of particular interest.

Dr. Dongdong Feng
Dr. Jian Sun
Dr. Heming Dong 
Dr. Yu Zhang 
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • CO2 capture
  • CO2 conversion and reduction
  • biomass thermal conversion
  • oxy-fuel or chemical looping combustion
  • CO2 storage
  • CO2 mineralization
  • other greenhouse gas emissions control

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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46 pages, 3827 KiB  
Article
Breathing Planet Earth: Analysis of Keeling’s Data on CO2 and O2 with Respiratory Quotient (RQ), Part II: Energy-Based Global RQ and CO2 Budget
by Kalyan Annamalai
Energies 2024, 17(8), 1800; https://doi.org/10.3390/en17081800 - 09 Apr 2024
Viewed by 281
Abstract
For breathing humans, the respiratory quotient (RQ = CO2 moles released/O2 mols consumed) ranges from 0.7 to 1.0. In Part I, the literature on the RQ was reviewed and Keeling’s data on atmospheric CO2 and O2 concentrations (1991–2018) were [...] Read more.
For breathing humans, the respiratory quotient (RQ = CO2 moles released/O2 mols consumed) ranges from 0.7 to 1.0. In Part I, the literature on the RQ was reviewed and Keeling’s data on atmospheric CO2 and O2 concentrations (1991–2018) were used in the estimation of the global RQ as 0.47. A new interpretation of RQGlob is provided in Part II by treating the planet as a “Hypothetical Biological system (HBS)”. The CO2 and O2 balance equations are adopted for estimating (i) energy-based RQGlob(En) and (ii) the CO2 distribution in GT/year and % of CO2 captured by the atmosphere, land, and ocean. The key findings are as follows: (i) The RQGlob(En) is estimated as 0.35 and is relatively constant from 1991 to 2020. The use of RQGlob(En) enables the estimation of CO2 added to the atmosphere from the knowledge of annual fossil fuel (FF) energy data; (ii) The RQ method for the CO2 budget is validated by comparing the annual CO2 distribution results with results from more detailed models; (iii) Explicit relations are presented for CO2 sink in the atmosphere, land, and ocean biomasses, and storage in ocean water from the knowledge of curve fit constants of Keeling’s curves and the RQ of FF and biomasses; (iv) The rate of global average temperature rise (0.27 °C/decade) is predicted using RQGlob,(En) and the annual energy release rate and compared with the literature data; and (v) Earth’s mass loss in GT and O2 in the atmosphere are predicted by extrapolating the curve fit to the year 3700. The effect of RQGlob and RQFF on the econometry and policy issues is briefly discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Dioxide Capture, Utilization and Storage (CCUS) Ⅱ)
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14 pages, 2924 KiB  
Article
Large-Scale Ex Situ Tests for CO2 Storage in Coal Beds
by Marian Wiatowski, Krzysztof Kapusta, Kamil Stańczyk, Marcin Szyja, Shakil Masum, Sivachidambaram Sadasivam and Hywel Rhys Thomas
Energies 2023, 16(17), 6326; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16176326 - 31 Aug 2023
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Abstract
This publication discusses the experiments and findings of project ROCCS (Establishing a Research Observatory to Unlock European Coal Seams for Carbon Dioxide Storage), which aimed to investigate the potential for carbon dioxide storage in coal seams. The project involved large-scale ex situ laboratory [...] Read more.
This publication discusses the experiments and findings of project ROCCS (Establishing a Research Observatory to Unlock European Coal Seams for Carbon Dioxide Storage), which aimed to investigate the potential for carbon dioxide storage in coal seams. The project involved large-scale ex situ laboratory tests, where CO2 was injected into an experimental coal seam using a high-pressure reactor at the Central Mining Institute in Poland. The reactor simulated underground conditions, and the experimental coal seam measured 3.05 m in length with a cross-section of 0.4 × 0.4 m. Parameters such as gas flow, temperatures, and pressures were monitored during the experiments. In the study conducted, the sorption capacity of coal from the Polish mine “Piast-Ziemowit” for CO2, at a sorption pressure of 30 bar, was determined to be 4.8% by weight relative to the raw coal mass. The data collected from these ex situ tests can support the design of a potential commercial-scale CO2 storage installation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Dioxide Capture, Utilization and Storage (CCUS) Ⅱ)
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19 pages, 2627 KiB  
Article
A Novel Multi-Phase Strategy for Optimizing CO2 Utilization and Storage in an Oil Reservoir
by Jiangyuan Yao, Wanju Yuan, Xiaolong Peng, Zhuoheng Chen and Yongan Gu
Energies 2023, 16(14), 5289; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16145289 - 10 Jul 2023
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Abstract
In this paper, an innovative multi-phase strategy is developed and numerically tested to optimize CO2 utilization and storage in an oil reservoir to support low carbon transition. In the first phase, the water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection is conducted to simultaneously store CO2 [...] Read more.
In this paper, an innovative multi-phase strategy is developed and numerically tested to optimize CO2 utilization and storage in an oil reservoir to support low carbon transition. In the first phase, the water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection is conducted to simultaneously store CO2 and produce crude oil in the reservoir from the respective injection and production wells. In the second phase, the injection and production wells are both shut in for some time to allow CO2 and water to be stratigraphically separated. In the third phase, CO2 is injected from the upper part of the reservoir above the separated water layer to displace water downwards, while fluids continue to be produced in the water-dominated zone from the lower part of the production well. Lastly, the production well is finally shut in when the produced gas–water ratio (GWR) reaches 95%, but CO2 injection is kept until the reservoir pressure is close to the fracture pressure of its caprocks. The numerical simulations show that implementing the proposed multi-phase strategy doubles CO2 storage in comparison to applying the WAG injection alone. In particular, 80% of the increased CO2 is stored in the third phase due to the optimized perforation. In addition, the CO2 injection rate in the last phase does not appear to affect the amount of CO2 storage, while a higher CO2 injection rate can reduce the CO2 injection time and accelerate the CO2 storage process. In the proposed strategy, we assume that the geothermal energy resources from the produced fluids can be utilized to offset some energy needs for the operation. The analysis of energy gain and consumption from the simulation found that at the early stage of the CO2-WAG phase, the energy gain mostly comes from the produced oil. At the late stage of the CO2-WAG phase and the subsequent phases, there is very little or even no energy gain from the produced oil. However, the geothermal energy of the produced water and CO2 substantially compensate for the energy loss due to decreasing oil production. As a result, a net energy gain can be achieved from the proposed multi-phase strategy when geothermal energy extraction is incorporated. The new multi-phase strategy and numerical simulation provide insights for practical energy transition and CO2 storage by converting a “to be depleted” oil reservoir to a CO2 storage site and a geothermal energy producer while enhancing oil recovery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Dioxide Capture, Utilization and Storage (CCUS) Ⅱ)
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Review

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24 pages, 8876 KiB  
Review
A Review on CO2 Sequestration via Mineralization of Coal Fly Ash
by Long Jiang, Liang Cheng, Yuxuan Zhang, Gaojun Liu and Jian Sun
Energies 2023, 16(17), 6241; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16176241 - 28 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1213
Abstract
Coal fly ashes (COFA) are readily available and reactive materials suitable for CO2 sequestration due to their substantial alkali components. Therefore, the onsite collaborative technology of COFA disposal and CO2 sequestration in coal-fired power plants appears to have potential. This work [...] Read more.
Coal fly ashes (COFA) are readily available and reactive materials suitable for CO2 sequestration due to their substantial alkali components. Therefore, the onsite collaborative technology of COFA disposal and CO2 sequestration in coal-fired power plants appears to have potential. This work provides an overview of the state-of-the-art research studies in the literature on CO2 sequestration via the mineralization of COFA. The various CO2 sequestration routes of COFA are summarized, mainly including direct and indirect wet carbonation, the synthesis of porous CO2 adsorbents derived from COFA, and the development of COFA-derived inert supports for gas-solid adsorbents. The direct and indirect wet carbonation of COFA is the most concerned research technology route, which can obtain valued Ca-based by-products while achieving CO2 sequestration. Moreover, the Al and Si components rich in fly ash can be adapted to produce zeolite, hierarchical porous nano-silica, and nano-silicon/aluminum aerogels for producing highly efficient CO2 adsorbents. The prospects of CO2 sequestration technologies using COFA are also discussed. The objective of this work is to help researchers from academia and industry keep abreast of the latest progress in the study of CO2 sequestration by COFA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Dioxide Capture, Utilization and Storage (CCUS) Ⅱ)
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