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Energy Demand and Small Scale Renewable Energy Applications

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2019) | Viewed by 13787

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Business Development and Technology (BTECH/AU Herning), Aarhus University, Engineering & Technology Research Group–EngTech, Center for Energy Technologies–CET, Birk Centerpark 15, 7400 Herning, Denmark
Interests: energy planning and resources optimization; wind resource assessment; exergy analysis; energy demand; electricity markets
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Distributed energy resources (DERs) are resources or flexible loads linked to the balancing needs of a system via altering demand or electricity generation in order to work towards higher renewable energy integration. However, large-scale distributed energy systems still entail management of centralized systems in another format. On the other hand, small-scale renewable energy applications represent how a nanogrid operates and are considered the main protagonists of the peer-to-peer (P2P) energy trading mechanisms. All new, revolutionary platforms for energy trading such as blockchain-based platforms are based on new applications on a small scale. The scope of this Special Issue is to explore how new applications influence electricity market participation; how prosumers influence trading prices; how energy demand alterations affects end users; and how various flexible loads, “unborn” markets, and crosslinks could eventually lead to an integrated, exergetically-evaluated, and more efficient energy system. Some of the key focus areas include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • The need for participation in the market by all consumers via smart platforms, under various demand-response programs
  • Transformative, multi-value markets that could create new business areas
  • Multiple-revenue stream approaches for microgeneration
  • Microgeneration and decentralized energy management planning

Prof. Dr. George Xydis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • small-scale renewable energy applications
  • microgeneration
  • energy demand
  • energy trading
  • flexible loads
  • multiple-revenue streams
  • transformative multi-value markets

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 1613 KiB  
Article
Optimization of Photoperiod and Quality Assessment of Basil Plants Grown in a Small-Scale Indoor Cultivation System for Reduction of Energy Demand
by Dafni Despoina Avgoustaki
Energies 2019, 12(20), 3980; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12203980 - 19 Oct 2019
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 5188
Abstract
Vertical farming is a novel type of food production in indoor environments with artificial lighting and controlled cultivation conditions. In this context, sustainability in small-scale indoor cultivation systems is crucial. Sustainability can be achieved by optimizing all the cultivation factors involved in the [...] Read more.
Vertical farming is a novel type of food production in indoor environments with artificial lighting and controlled cultivation conditions. In this context, sustainability in small-scale indoor cultivation systems is crucial. Sustainability can be achieved by optimizing all the cultivation factors involved in the production process. The effects of different photoperiod conditions under different timing during plant development—from sowing to germination and maturity—have been studied in a small-scale indoor cultivation area. The main objective of this research was to investigate the possibilities of an optimized photoperiod for basil plants to reduce the energy demand cost of the cultivation unit. Three different photoperiod treatments (P8D16L, P10D14L, and P11D13L) were applied to basil plants with stable light intensity. Furthermore, the photoperiod was shortened to test the reaction of the biomass from the plants in a reduced energy demand system. The dry biomass produced was measured along with the energy consumed in each treatment. The basil quality was assessed by measuring different physiological indices, such as chlorophyll a (Chl a), chlorophyll b (Chl b), total chlorophyll (Chl tot), the fraction of photosynthetically active irradiance absorbed by the leaf, and leaf temperature. The results of the study showed that a shorter photoperiod did not negatively affect the quantity and quality of the basil plants. Continuously, the evaluation of the energy demand variation under the different photoperiod treatments can provide a significant positive impact on the energetic, ecological, and economic aspects of small-scale food production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Demand and Small Scale Renewable Energy Applications)
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20 pages, 4590 KiB  
Article
Identification of Potential Locations for Run-of-River Hydropower Plants Using a GIS-Based Procedure
by Vincenzo Sammartano, Lorena Liuzzo and Gabriele Freni
Energies 2019, 12(18), 3446; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12183446 - 06 Sep 2019
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 4226
Abstract
The increasing demand for renewable and sustainable energy sources has encouraged the development of small run-of-river plants. Preliminary studies are required to assess the technical and economic feasibility of such plants. In this context, the identification of optimal potential run-of-river sites has become [...] Read more.
The increasing demand for renewable and sustainable energy sources has encouraged the development of small run-of-river plants. Preliminary studies are required to assess the technical and economic feasibility of such plants. In this context, the identification of optimal potential run-of-river sites has become a key issue. In this paper, an approach that is based on GIS tools coupled with a hydrological model has been applied to detect potential locations for a run-of-river plant. A great number of locations has been analyzed to identify those that could assure the achievement of different thresholds of potential power. The environmental and economic feasibility for small hydropower projects in these locations has been assessed and a multi-objective analysis has been carried out to highlight the most profitable configurations. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) has been calibrated to simulate runoff in the Taw at Umberleigh catchment (South West England). The results showed that, in the area of study, different locations could be selected as suitable for run-of-river plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Demand and Small Scale Renewable Energy Applications)
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20 pages, 648 KiB  
Article
Factors Affecting Sustainable Market Acceptance of Residential Microgeneration Technologies. A Two Time Period Comparative Analysis
by Spyridon Karytsas, Ioannis Vardopoulos and Eleni Theodoropoulou
Energies 2019, 12(17), 3298; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12173298 - 27 Aug 2019
Cited by 38 | Viewed by 3875
Abstract
On a global scale, the residential sector is responsible for a significant part of consumed energy, of which the major part is dependent upon fossil fuels. A solution for the reduction of fossil fuel use is the application of residential microgeneration technologies. The [...] Read more.
On a global scale, the residential sector is responsible for a significant part of consumed energy, of which the major part is dependent upon fossil fuels. A solution for the reduction of fossil fuel use is the application of residential microgeneration technologies. The present study examines the market acceptance factors of such systems in Greece, as well as how these factors change over time, based on real decisions made by consumers. In this context, two surveys applying a common questionnaire were performed in 2012 and 2019 in order to examine the effects of (a) socioeconomic, residence, and spatial characteristics, (b) environmental awareness and behavior, and (c) factors related to consumer behavior, attitudes, and system attribute preferences. Factors affecting the installation of a microgeneration system are gender, age, income, residence type, ownership and size, environmental behavior, use of a subsidy program, as well as views on costs and market-related issues. When evaluating the effect of these factors over time, socioeconomic and residence characteristics, as well as environmental behavior, seem to have a fixed effect to the installation of residential microgeneration systems, with market acceptance fluctuations being related mainly to market conditions, including existing subsidy programs, expectations on fuel prices, and legislation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Demand and Small Scale Renewable Energy Applications)
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