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Energy Harvesting in Aerospace Engineering

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "D: Energy Storage and Application".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 January 2023) | Viewed by 6154

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy
Interests: smart structures; fluid–structure interaction; flow-induced structural vibrations; energy harvesting; piezoelectric materials for aerospace
1. Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Sapienza University of Rome, 00185 Rome, Italy
2. Department of Mechatronics Engineering, College of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, NUST, Islamabad, Pakistan
Interests: energy harvesting; piezoelectric materials; MEMS; NEMS; IoT; smart structures; fatigue
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Sapienza University of Rome, 00185 Rome, Italy
Interests: fluid–structure interaction; flow-induced structural vibrations; energy harvesting; piezoelectric materials for aerospace; nonlinear systems

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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Sapienza University of Rome, Roma, Italy
Interests: piezoelectric materials for aerospace; smart composites; finite element modeling; composite structures; energy harvesting

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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy
Interests: structural mechanics; computational mechanics; structural-health monitoring; wave propagation in composite media; elastodynamics; high/low-velocity impacts; particle beam impacts; smart materials and structures; composite structures; thermal structures; aerospace structures; additive manufacturing; smart manufacturing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With recent advancements in low-power integrated circuits and the emerging Internet of Things (IoT) applications, power sources have evolved in the aerospace industry. When it comes to such low-power electronic devices, it is necessary for them to have their own power source rather than relying on external batteries that have a limited lifespan, and in some cases, their replacement is problematic as well, e.g., wireless sensors for suborbital missions. Energy harvesting is the process by which light, thermal, solar, and kinetic energy can be converted to a usable form of energy with the ultimate objective of developing self-powered sensors, actuators, and other electronic devices. Converting mechanical, chemical, aeroelastic, light, thermal, and/or solar energy into electrical energy is a very promising field in aerospace. Energy harvesting in aerospace engineering can be achieved using either electromagnetic, electrostatic or piezoelectric transduction mechanisms. Each of these sources of energy can be used to power remote sensors, actuators or microelectronic devices. This Special Issue on “Energy Harvesting in Aerospace Engineering” aims at collecting current trends in the field, which may include the mathematical modeling, numerical modeling, experimentation, and advanced manufacturing of embedded electronics.

Prof. Dr. Paolo Gaudenzi
Dr. Hassan Elahi
Dr. Marco Eugeni
Prof. Dr. Luca Lampani
Dr. Michele Pasquali
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Aeroelastic energy harvesting
  • Solar energy
  • Thermal energy
  • Chemical energy
  • Fuel cells
  • Fluid–structure interaction
  • Energy harvesting systems for IoTs
  • Piezoelectric
  • Electromagnetic
  • Electrostatic
  • Advanced manufacturing for embedded electronics
  • Energy Materials

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

9 pages, 1843 KiB  
Article
Effect of Molybdenum Disulfide on the Performance of Polyaniline Based Counter Electrode for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Applications
by Usman Ghafoor, Anas Bin Aqeel, Uzair Khaleeq uz Zaman, Taiba Zahid, Muhammad Noman and Muhammad Shakeel Ahmad
Energies 2021, 14(13), 3786; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14133786 - 24 Jun 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1851
Abstract
Dye-sensitized solar cells are gaining interest in the aerospace industry, extending their applications from solar-powered drones to origami-style space-based solar power stations due to their flexibility, light weightiness, and transparency. The major issue with its widespread commercial use is the employment of expensive [...] Read more.
Dye-sensitized solar cells are gaining interest in the aerospace industry, extending their applications from solar-powered drones to origami-style space-based solar power stations due to their flexibility, light weightiness, and transparency. The major issue with its widespread commercial use is the employment of expensive Pt-based counter electrodes. In this study, an attempt has been made to replace the Pt with Polyaniline (PANI)/Molybdenum sulfide (MoS2) nanocomposite. The nanocomposites i.e., PANI-0.5wt% MoS2, PANI-2wt%MoS2, PANI-5wt%MoS2, and PANI-7wt%MoS2and PANI-9wt%MoS2, have been synthesized and compared with standard Pt-based CE. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction methods have been utilized to study both surface morphology and structural composition. Fourier transform infrared has also been used to identify redox-active functionalities. Electron impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry have been employed to study electron transfer and catalytic activity. Finally, I-V testing has been conducted using a sun simulator. A maximum efficiency of 8.12% has been observed with 7wt% MoS2 in the PANI matrix at 6 µm thickness, which is 2.65% higher compared to standard Pt-based CE (7.91%). This is due to high electronic conduction with the addition of MoS2, improved catalytic activity, and the high surface area of the PANI nano-rods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Harvesting in Aerospace Engineering)
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19 pages, 6773 KiB  
Article
Numerical Assessment and Parametric Optimization of a Piezoelectric Wind Energy Harvester for IoT-Based Applications
by Muhammad Abdullah Sheeraz, Muhammad Sohail Malik, Khalid Rehman, Hassan Elahi, Zubair Butt, Iftikhar Ahmad, Marco Eugeni and Paolo Gaudenzi
Energies 2021, 14(9), 2498; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14092498 - 27 Apr 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3024
Abstract
In the 21st century, researchers have been showing keen interest in the areas of wireless networking and internet of things (IoT) devices. Conventionally, batteries have been used to power these networks; however, due to the limited lifespan of batteries and with the recent [...] Read more.
In the 21st century, researchers have been showing keen interest in the areas of wireless networking and internet of things (IoT) devices. Conventionally, batteries have been used to power these networks; however, due to the limited lifespan of batteries and with the recent advancements in piezoelectric technology, there is a dramatic increase in renewable energy harvesting devices. In this research, an eco-friendly wind energy harvesting device based on the piezoelectric technique is analytically modeled, numerically simulated, and statistically optimized for low power applications. MATLAB toolbox SIMSCAPE is utilized to simulate the proposed wind energy harvester in which a windmill is used to produce rotational motion due to the kinetic energy of wind. The windmill’s rotational shaft is further connected to the rotary to linear converter (RLC) and vibration enhancement mechanism (VEM) for the generation of translational mechanical vibration. Consequently, due to these alternative linear vibrations, the piezoelectric stack produces sufficient electrical output. The output response of the energy harvester is analyzed for the various conditions of piezoelectric thickness, wind speed, rotor angular velocity, and VEM stiffness. It is observed that the electrical power of the proposed harvester is proportional to the cube of wind speed and is inversely proportional to the number of rotor blades. Furthermore, an optimization strategy based on the full factorial design of the experiment is developed and implemented on MINITAB 18.0 for evaluating the statistical performance of the proposed harvester. It is noticed that a design with 3 rotor-blades, having 3 mm piezoelectric thickness, and 40 Nm−1 stiffness generates the optimum electrical response of the harvester. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Harvesting in Aerospace Engineering)
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