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Green Hydrogen Production from Water Electrolysis Technologies

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "A5: Hydrogen Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 1208

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Energy, Center for Energy, Environmental and Technological Research (CIEMAT), Av. Complutense, 40, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: fuel cell and hydrogen technologies; surface chemistry; adsorption; heterogeneous catalysis; catalyst; oxidation; kinetics; electrochemistry; catalysis; catalyst synthesis; catalyst characterization; materials chemistry; carbon chemistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Energy, Center for Energy, Environmental and Technological Research (CIEMAT), Av. Complutense, 40, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: fuel cell and hydrogen technologies; surface chemistry; adsorption; heterogeneous catalysis; catalyst; oxidation; kinetics; electrochemistry; catalysis; catalyst synthesis; catalyst characterization; materials chemistry; carbon chemistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Energy, Center for Energy, Environmental and Technological Research (CIEMAT), Av. Complutense, 40, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: high temperature fuel cells and electrolysers; hydrogen technology; electrochemistry; corrosion science; materials chemistry

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Energy, Center for Energy, Environmental and Technological Research (CIEMAT), Av. Complutense, 40, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: low temperature fuel cells and electrolysers; hydrogen technologies; surface chemistry; corrosion science; electrochemistry; materials chemistry, carbon chemistry, graphene

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the original ‘hydrogen economy’ concept created by John Bockris in the 1970s, hydrogen was produced via water electrolysis and transported through pipelines to factories, homes, and fuelling stations, where it would be converted back to electricity in on-site fuel cells. Since then, discrete efforts have been progressing to put forth plans for a ‘hydrogen society’. However, in recent years the hydrogen economy has changed from being a distant concept to become imperative. Decarbonising the global economy is a priority to limit the harmful effects of the huge amounts of greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere. In order to enable a 100% renewable energy society, the hydrogen economy is the keystone for green energy storage. Hydrogen and electricity will work in tandem to service all energy-related sectors.

In the coming years, green hydrogen will be progressively integrated into industry, transportation, buildings, heating, and power sectors. In this scenario, water electrolysis technologies are attracting a great deal of attention and gathering numerous efforts to quickly improve their readiness level. This Special Issue is devoted to analysing the current state-of-the-art intending to provide a general overview of relevant factors for its implementation in a mid-term hydrogen economy. Studies providing a fundamental reference for experts to complete their assessments on available technological options, their progress and integration with renewable energy sources; providing models for the scalability of plants, as well as distribution and optimal localization; as well as techno-economic analyses and the most probable scenarios in the near future are expected to be essential tools for actors involved in project planning, implementation, decision making and monitoring.

Although this Special Issue is open to all contributions related to hydrogen production by water electrolysis, the main potential focus areas are summarized as follows:

  • Comparative evaluation of different types of technologies: alkaline water electrolysis (AWE), anion exchange membrane water electrolysis (AEMWE), proton exchange membrane water electrolysis (PEMWE);
  • Electrolysis materials, components and systems;
  • Technical and operational challenges;
  • Integration with renewable energy sources: models and configurations;
  • Balance of plant engineering;
  • Modelling and simulation;
  • Economic factors: cost optimization;
  • Environmental impacts/benefits;
  • Water resources: seawater vs. freshwater; water recycling for hydrogen production;
  • Recycling processes and sustainability;
  • Life-cycle and risk assessments.

Dr. Paloma Ferreira-Aparicio
Dr. Araceli Fuerte
Dr. Concepción Caravaca Moreno
Dr. Alba Fernández-Sotillo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • green hydrogen
  • water electrolysis technology
  • renewable energy integration
  • socio-economic and lifecycle assessments
  • balance of plant engineering

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

38 pages, 2269 KiB  
Article
Investigating the Role of Byproduct Oxygen in UK-Based Future Scenario Models for Green Hydrogen Electrolysis
by Cameron Campbell-Stanway, Victor Becerra, Shanker Prabhu and James Bull
Energies 2024, 17(2), 281; https://doi.org/10.3390/en17020281 - 05 Jan 2024
Viewed by 852
Abstract
Water electrolysis for hydrogen production with renewable electricity is regularly studied as an option for decarbonised future energy scenarios. The inclusion of byproduct electrolytic oxygen capture and sale is of interest for parallel decarbonisation efforts elsewhere in the industry and could contribute to [...] Read more.
Water electrolysis for hydrogen production with renewable electricity is regularly studied as an option for decarbonised future energy scenarios. The inclusion of byproduct electrolytic oxygen capture and sale is of interest for parallel decarbonisation efforts elsewhere in the industry and could contribute to reducing green hydrogen costs. A deterministic hydrogen electrolysis system model is constructed to compare oxygen inclusion/exclusion scenarios. This uses wind and solar-PV electricity generation timeseries, a power-dependent electrolysis model to determine the energy efficiency of gas yield, and power allocation for gas post-processing energy within each hourly timestep. This maintains a fully renewable (and therefore low/zero carbon) electricity source for electrolysis and gas post-processing. The model is validated (excluding oxygen) against an existing low-cost GW-scale solar-hydrogen production scenario and an existing hydrogen production costs study with offshore wind generation at the multi-MW scale. For both comparisons, oxygen inclusion is then evaluated to demonstrate both the benefits and drawbacks of capture and utilisation, for different scenario conditions, and high parameter sensitivity can be seen regarding the price of renewable electricity. This work subsequently proposes that the option for the potential utilisation of byproduct oxygen should be included in future research to exemplify otherwise missed benefits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Hydrogen Production from Water Electrolysis Technologies)
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