Equity in Science Education: Advancing Social Justice, Democracy, and Indigeneity in Teaching and Learning

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102). This special issue belongs to the section "Curriculum and Instruction".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 6019

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
Interests: equity, social justice, and urban teacher education in STEM education; race and racism in STEM education; STEM education and food security in the Global South Indigenous Science Knowledge (ISK)

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Guest Editor
Department of Teacher Education, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1034, USA
Interests: science education; educational policy; leadership in science education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Equity is a central aspect of science education, but it has eluded many science teachers, educators, researchers, curriculum developers, and policy makers for a long time. Unfortunately, equity in science education is a contested idea. This struggle has created many challenges to conceptualize the meaning and scope of equity and the processes of attaining equity in science teaching and learning. The goal of science education for equity is to prepare students from all levels of diverse groups, but specifically from underrepresented groups, for social justice, democratic ideals, and locally authentic and relevant learning (indigeneity in teaching and learning). As the pressure of globalization seeps into many underrepresented communities’ social, economic, cultural, and democratic lives, teachers and schools must consider equity as the central focus for better science education. In many parts of the globe, people from underrepresented communities (gendered, ethnic, linguistics, cultural, and historical minorities, including Indigenous groups) have been marginalized. Therefore, marginalized people have been deprived and excluded from participating in science and science-related opportunities. The science education community has lost, and is in jeopardy of continuing to lose, many talented and transformative individuals from underrepresented groups who could have contributed to science and their communities for a better human experience. Thus, the co-guest editors of this issue envision equity in science education as an urgent need for a more equitable, socially just, democratic, and authentic science teaching and learning. We also believe that a multitude of diverse voices and experiences from across the globe would greatly improve our understanding of equity in science education and contribute to our knowledge on equity from multiple perspectives. Science education research has explored many disparities using multiple methodologies and in different contexts, but research in science education still fails to bring voices from the margins. Therefore, this Special Issue themed “Equity in Science Education: Advancing Social Justice, Democracy, and Indigeneity in Teaching and Learninginvites scholars and educators to share their research works and experiences in this area so that science education can expand knowledge and practices that aid in building a more equitable science and teaching and learning experiences.

This Special Issue is interested in both empirical and theoretical manuscripts that explore issues related to equity in science education in varied contexts, languages, and cultures. We highly encourage authors to take a critical stance in their methodologies and theoretical frameworks (culturally relevant pedagogy, critical race theories, feminist theories, multicultural theories, (critical) agency, Indigenous science knowledge (ISK), etc.). We encourage authors to explore broadly some of the following questions in different contexts:

  1. What does equity in science teaching, learning, and engagement look like in primary, elementary, middle, high school, and college classrooms as well as informal settings, such as the museums, nature centers, and other non-formal environments?
  2. How do teachers’ instructional decisions influence equity in science education?
  3. How and in what ways do science teacher preparation programs explore the issues of equity in science education?
  4. How does equity intersect with other disparities such gender, language, ethnic groups, etc. in teaching and learning science?
  5. How should science teacher preparation and teacher professional development programs consider equity in science education, and why?
  6. What does equity in science education look like when issues of social justice and democracy are centralized in educating youth?
  7. How could equity in science education support greater participation from indigenous groups?      

Authors are welcome to explore these and other issues related to equity in science education in different contexts, such as K-12 schools, urban, rural, higher education, after school programs, and informal spaces (e.g., museums) and using different theoretical and methodological approaches.

Prof. Dr. Bhaskar Upadhyay
Dr. Stefanie Marshall
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • equity
  • science education
  • STEM education
  • social justice
  • democracy
  • indigeneity
  • teaching and learning

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

18 pages, 1776 KiB  
Article
Engaging Ethnic-Diverse Students: A Research Based on Culturally Responsive Teaching for Roma-Gypsy Students
by Jennifer Meléndez-Luces and Pilar Couto-Cantero
Educ. Sci. 2021, 11(11), 739; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11110739 - 16 Nov 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3819
Abstract
Intercultural Education is a key feature in the development of inclusion strategies aimed at ethnically diverse students. Transformative approaches towards learning such as Culturally Responsive Teaching (CRT) are essential in order to answer the educative needs that arise due to the coexistence between [...] Read more.
Intercultural Education is a key feature in the development of inclusion strategies aimed at ethnically diverse students. Transformative approaches towards learning such as Culturally Responsive Teaching (CRT) are essential in order to answer the educative needs that arise due to the coexistence between ethnic minorities and mainstream society. Therefore, cultural and historical representation of these communities play an important role as gatekeepers in order to achieve positive results as far as inclusive education is concerned. This article explores research based on a case study carried out in a high school located in the North-West of Spain developing successful learning stories after implementing the CRT methodology within the teaching of English as a foreign language. For its development, this article examines the trajectory of education with Roma-Gypsy students and moves forward with previous studies that endorse the success of using this approach among ethnically diverse students for their inclusion within the educative system. Intercultural and Plurilingual Education is a key feature in the development of inclusion strategies aimed at ethnically diverse students. This article includes research based on a case study carried out in a high school located in the North-West of Spain. It is aimed at: 1. Engaging ethnically diverse students to become part of the mainstream classroom through the inclusion of their culture; 2. Improving their language skills and competencies in the learning of a foreign language; 3. Raising the attendance at schools of ethnically diverse students. To achieve these targets the Culturally Responsive Teaching (CRT) Methodology has been implemented. CRT is considered essential to answer the educative needs that arise due to the coexistence between ethnic minorities and conventional communities. After gathering and analyzing data, results show that: ethnically diverse students’ motivation has been increased; it also expanded their social skills among peers; they gained more visibility; and finally, both diverse and non-diverse learners improved their proficiency in the English language. The discussion section states that the use of CRT Methodology traditionally used with Afro-American and Native-American students is also relevant for the Roma-Gypsy students that took part in this study. Full article
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