Cognitive Load Theory: Emerging Trends and Innovations

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102). This special issue belongs to the section "Education and Psychology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 May 2024 | Viewed by 2582

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. DPECS, Erasmus School of Social and Behavioural Sciences (ESSB), Erasmus University Rotterdam, 3062 PA Rotterdam, The Netherlands
2. School of Education/Early Start, University of Wollongong, Northfields Ave, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
3. School of Education, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2308, Australia
Interests: cognitive load theory; mental effort measurement; embodied cognition

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Guest Editor
Laboratoire de Psychologie, Université Paul-Valérie Montpellier, CEDEX 5, 34199 Montpellier, France
Interests: cognitive load theory; mental effort measurement; education

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Guest Editor
DPECS, Erasmus School of Social and Behavioural Sciences (ESSB), Erasmus University Rotterdam, 3062 PA Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Interests: cognitive load theory; gestures; environments; (embodied) cognition

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Guest Editor
APSY-v Lab, University of Nîmes, 30021 Nîmes, France
Interests: cognitive load theory; evolutionary educational psychology; reasoning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to invite you to contribute to a forthcoming Special Issue in Education Sciences, focused on the advancing field of Cognitive Load Theory (CLT). Originating from educational psychology, CLT provides an empirically validated framework for designing effective instructional methods that align with the human cognitive architecture. Over the years, CLT has significantly influenced educational research and practice, offering insights into optimizing learning and instruction.

This Special Issue aims to serve as a platform for innovative empirical research, theoretical advancements, and best practices centered around Cognitive Load Theory. We welcome submissions that explore novel applications of CLT across diverse educational settings, investigate cognitive load factors in emerging technologies, or offer meta-analyses and systematic reviews that critically examine the existing body of CLT research.

The key questions that this Special Issue aims to address include but are not limited to:

  • How can CLT-based instructional designs improve learning outcomes across disciplines?
  • What are the implications of CLT for emerging technologies such as virtual reality, augmented reality, or artificial intelligence in education?
  • How can cognitive load be measured?
  • How can the principles of CLT be integrated into teacher education and professional development?
  • What is the interaction between motivation and cognitive load in influencing learning outcomes?
  • How does the use of self-regulated learning strategies modulate cognitive load and impact learning outcomes in learning environments?
  • How does the incorporation of embodied cognition strategies in instructional design affect the different types of cognitive load in learning tasks?
  • How do evolved cognitive mechanisms interact with instructional design to influence cognitive load and learning outcomes?
  • What evidence can be provided for new CLT effects, such as the working memory depletion effect?

Contributions can be empirical articles, theoretical papers, or comprehensive reviews. Interdisciplinary submissions that bridge educational psychology with other domains are particularly encouraged.

We look forward to your valuable contributions to this vital area of research.

Best regards,

Prof. Dr. Fred Paas
Prof. Dr. Andre Tricot
Dr. Kim Ouwehand
Dr. Florence Lespiau
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cognitive load theory
  • cognitive load measurement
  • learning environments
  • evolutionary educational psychology
  • self-regulated learning
  • embodied cognition
  • working memory depletion

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 234 KiB  
Article
Best of Both Worlds? Combining Physical and Mental Self-Management Strategies to Support Learning from Split-Attention Examples
by Björn B. de Koning
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 284; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030284 - 07 Mar 2024
Viewed by 636
Abstract
The self-management principle holds that higher learning performance is obtained when learners actively use instructional strategies to manage the working memory load imposed by a learning task. Self-management studies with spatially separated but mutually referring text and pictures (split-attention examples) demonstrate the learning [...] Read more.
The self-management principle holds that higher learning performance is obtained when learners actively use instructional strategies to manage the working memory load imposed by a learning task. Self-management studies with spatially separated but mutually referring text and pictures (split-attention examples) demonstrate the learning benefits of physical (e.g., annotation) and mental (imagined drag-and-drop) strategies. We investigated whether combining physical and mental strategies supports learning beyond a single strategy. Eighty-four participants studied a split-attention example with or without using a physical strategy and/or a mental strategy. Participants completed retention, comprehension, and transfer tests, and rated their cognitive load. Results showed that the combined use of physical and mental strategies resulted in lower cognitive load during learning than using the physical strategy and was more instructionally efficient compared to all other conditions. There were no significant differences regarding learning outcomes. Together, this suggests that combining physical and mental strategies is most supportive for studying split-attention examples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cognitive Load Theory: Emerging Trends and Innovations)
15 pages, 903 KiB  
Article
The Relationship between Interleaving and Variability Effects: A Cognitive Load Theory Perspective
by Ouhao Chen, Endah Retnowati, Juan Cristobal Castro-Alonso, Fred Paas and John Sweller
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(11), 1138; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13111138 - 14 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1223
Abstract
The interleaving effect indicates that students learn better from multiple areas that are interleaved rather than blocked. Two experiments tested the hypothesis that the effect is because interleaving facilitates comparisons between areas and is a variation of the variability effect that increases intrinsic [...] Read more.
The interleaving effect indicates that students learn better from multiple areas that are interleaved rather than blocked. Two experiments tested the hypothesis that the effect is because interleaving facilitates comparisons between areas and is a variation of the variability effect that increases intrinsic cognitive load. Experiment 1 used an interleaved design with two obviously different topics and found no interleaving effect. Experiment 2 used a similar design but used topics that were more difficult to discriminate between, resulting in a clear advantage for the interleaved group associated with an increase in cognitive load. These results support the hypothesis that the interleaving and variability effects are closely related. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cognitive Load Theory: Emerging Trends and Innovations)
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