Delivery Modes as for the New Ways of Teaching and Learning in Post COVID-19

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102). This special issue belongs to the section "Technology Enhanced Education".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2023) | Viewed by 6058

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Education, Learning and Learning Processes Research Unit (LLP), University of Oulu, P.O. Box 2000 Oulu, Finland
Interests: online learning; computer-supported collaborative learning; technology-enhanced learning; game-based learning; ICT in education; pedagogy; inquiry learning; teacher education; teaching methods

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Guest Editor
Department of Education, School of Humanities and Education, Tecnologico de Monterrey, Monterrey P.O. Box 64849, Mexico
Interests: online learning; distance learning; MOOC ICT in education; innovation in education; entrepreneurship in education; EdTech; Education 4.0

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Guest Editor
Department of Didactics and School Organization, University of Granada, 18010 Granada, Spain
Interests: mobile learning; educational technology; ICT; teacher training; higher education teaching; pedagogy; online learning; technology enhanced learning; social networks and social applications; internet risks
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

1) Introduction, including scientific background and highlighting the importance of this research area.

Word-widely the pandemic and the other issues such as globalization and digital development force us to re-think and develop our thoughts and ideas about learning and teaching. In the post-COVID-19 era, we need to reconsider how we define the role of education. We invite you for critical reflection and discussion of the position and the quality of Education 4.0? In what ways do we guarantee a high quality environment for learners which meets the criteria of Education 4.0. What elements and factors should we consider when designing and implementing learning and teaching environments in the post-COVID-19 era?

2) Aim of the Special Issue and how the subject relates to the journal scope.

This Special Issue provides a platform for discussion about teaching and learning in a digital age post-COVID-19.  We are interested in theoretical papers exploring learning and teaching in the post-COVID-19 era and discussing future perspectives. We welcome empirical papers with novel approaches for developing learning and teaching in different educational settings as well methodological papers related to the topic are appreciated.

3) Suggest themes.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Innovative and novel pedagogical approaches and strategies and design of teaching environments;
  • Learning approaches and strategies and assessment of learning, design of learning environments;
  • Use of learning analytics and artificial intelligence, augmented reality, simulations, and gamification;
  • Pupils’/students’ skills and knowledge, competence in the digital age;
  • Educator’s professional development in different educational settings;
  • Pre- and in-service teacher education;
  • Innovative solutions for learning and teaching at the different educational levels.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

References:

González-Pérez, L.I., & Ramírez-Montoya, M.S. (2022). Components of Education 4.0 in 21st Century Skills Frameworks: Systematic Review. Sustainability, 14(3),1493. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14031493

Häkkinen, P., Järvelä, S., Mäkitalo-Siegl, K., Ahonen, A. K., Näykki, P., & Valtonen, T. (2017). Preparing teacher students for twenty-first-century learning practices: a framework for enhancing collaborative problem-solving and strategic learning skills. Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice, 23(1), 25-41.

Iwata, M., Pitkänen, K., Laru, J., & Mäkitalo, K. (2020). Exploring Potentials and Challenges to Develop Twenty-First Century Skills and Computational Thinking in K-12 Maker Education. Frontiers in Education, 5, 87. https://doi.org/10.3389/feduc.2020.00087

Kahila, J., Valtonen, T., Tedre, M., & Mäkitalo, K. (2019). Children’s experiences on learning the 21st century skills with digital games. Games and Culture: A Journal of Interactive Media, 15(6), 685-706. https://doi.org/10.1177/1555412019845592

Miranda, J., Navarrete, C., Noguez, J. Molina-Espinosa, J.M., Ramírez-Montoya, M.S., Navarro-Tuch, S., Bustamante-Bello, M., Rosas-Fernández, J.B. & Molina, A. (2021). The core components of education 4.0 in higher education: Three case studies in engineering education. Computers & Electrical Engineering, 93. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compeleceng.2021.107278

Ramírez-Montoya, M. S., Castillo-Martínez, I.M., Sanabria-Zepeda, J.C., & Miranda, J. (2022). Complex Thinking in the Framework of Education 4.0 and Open Innovation—A Systematic Literature Review. Journal of Open Innovation:Technology, Market, and Complexity, 8(4). https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc8010004

Sarango-Lapo, C.P.; Mena, J. & Ramírez-Montoya, M.S. (2021). Evidence-Based Educational Innovation Model Linked to Digital Information Competence in the Framework of Education 4.0. Sustainability, 13(18), 10034. https://doi.org/10.3390/su131810034

Valtonen, T., Hoang, N., Sointu, E., Näykki, P., Virtanen, A., Pöysä-Tarhonen, J., Häkkinen, P., Järvelä, S., Mäkitalo, K., & Kukkonen, J. (2021). How pre-service teachers perceive their 21st-century skills and dispositions: A longitudinal perspective. Computers in Human Behavior, 116. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2020.106643

Aznar-Díaz, I., Hinojo-Lucena, F. J., Cáceres-Reche, M. P., & Romero-Rodríguez, J. M. (2020). Analysis of the determining factors of good teaching practices of mobile learning at the Spanish University. An explanatory model. Computers & Education,  159, 104007. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2020.104007

Romero-Rodríguez, J. M., Aznar-Díaz, I., Hinojo-Lucena, F. J., & Cáceres-Reche, M. P.  (2020). Models of good teaching practices for mobile learning in higher education. Palgrave Communications, 6(80), 1-7. https://doi.org/10.1057/s41599-020-0468-6

García-González, A., Aznar-Díaz, I., Ramírez-Montoya, M. S., & Romero-Rodríguez, J. M. (2022). Needs and expectations of university students: Learning from the impact of COVID-19 upon 9 Spanish universities. Issues in Educational Research, 31(2), 126-148. http://www.iier.org.au/iier32/garcia-gonzalez.pdf

Prof. Dr. Kati Mäkitalo
Dr. Leonardo David Glasserman-Morales
Prof. Dr. José-María Romero-Rodríguez
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • learning processes and outcomes
  • teaching approaches and methods
  • innovative educational practices
  • learning approaches
  • post COVID-19
  • teacher education
  • artificial intelligence/learning analytics
  • gamification/simulations
  • 21st century skills

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 287 KiB  
Article
Ethical Competence in Master’s Degrees: Definition and Shaping Factors
by Amèlia Tey-Teijón, Juan Llanes-Ordóñez and Laura Martínez-Rodríguez
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(11), 1137; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13111137 - 14 Nov 2023
Viewed by 728
Abstract
The inclusion of ethical competence in the training of master’s degree students remains a challenge. It has important links to the professionalization process, but unevenness has been found in its development and implementation, and this appears to generate shortcomings in training processes. The [...] Read more.
The inclusion of ethical competence in the training of master’s degree students remains a challenge. It has important links to the professionalization process, but unevenness has been found in its development and implementation, and this appears to generate shortcomings in training processes. The aim of this study is to understand the meaning of ethical competence and to identify factors that facilitate its inclusion in master’s degree programs. A multicentre phenomenological study was carried out at universities in Spain and Argentina. Students and faculty from ten master’s degree programs in different subjects participated. Three broad overall categories emerged from our analysis: competencies related to the professional profile; factors in the professionalizing process; and training in ethical competence. These categories suggest that ethical competence is a core rather than an added value for any professional, thereby stressing the need to address its pedagogical importance in education. Full article
15 pages, 1280 KiB  
Article
Teacher Training and Sustainable Development: Study within the Framework of the Transdisciplinary Project RRREMAKER
by Pilar Manuela Soto-Solier, Ana María García-López and María Belén Prados-Peña
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(8), 794; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13080794 - 03 Aug 2023
Viewed by 770
Abstract
The development of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is a challenge that requires the involvement of the educational system. This study seeks to identify the perception and knowledge of future teachers in relation to sustainable development (SD), the European Green Deal (ECD), and [...] Read more.
The development of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is a challenge that requires the involvement of the educational system. This study seeks to identify the perception and knowledge of future teachers in relation to sustainable development (SD), the European Green Deal (ECD), and circular economy (CE) at the University of Granada. A qualitative study was carried out, conducted face to face, using an online questionnaire in the classroom. A total of 321 students participated, from bachelor’s degrees in early childhood and primary education to master’s degrees in secondary education. Out of these, 176 validated questionnaires were analyzed. The results showed that future teachers understood the importance of SD education as an important social problem. They believed that education in SD, EGD, or CE could contribute to solving environmental and social problems. Nevertheless, they doubted whether this training should be included by universities in their training actions for teachers; they expressed reservations about the educational effectiveness of the curricula. However, most of them considered the need for more training in this area. Finally, they associated sustainable development mainly with the environmental dimension, followed by the social dimension, and to a lesser extent with the economic dimension. Full article
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15 pages, 812 KiB  
Article
Study Habits Developed by Mexican Higher Education Students during the Complexity of the COVID-19 Pandemic
by Carlos Enrique George-Reyes, Leonardo David Glasserman-Morales, Francisco Javier Rocha-Estrada and Jessica Alejandra Ruíz-Ramírez
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(6), 563; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13060563 - 30 May 2023
Viewed by 1711
Abstract
During the first 700 days of the COVID-19 pandemic in Mexico, higher education institutions adopted different types of technology-supported learning to provide continuity of teaching activities. The pandemic forced students to change their study habits to face the challenges of learning in the [...] Read more.
During the first 700 days of the COVID-19 pandemic in Mexico, higher education institutions adopted different types of technology-supported learning to provide continuity of teaching activities. The pandemic forced students to change their study habits to face the challenges of learning in the distance modality while using technologies for learning and knowledge. In this research, a questionnaire called “Survey of Study Habits for University Students after more than 700 days of the Pandemic in Mexico” was applied to inquire about habits that were strengthened or emerged in undergraduate and graduate university students who participated in non-face-to-face learning environments during the pandemic. The study involved 3000 students from public (n = 1500) and private (n = 1500) universities located in six areas of Mexico (comprising 32 states). The findings indicated that most of the students acquired at least one digital device and expanded their internet service, and perceived an improvement in their self-study skills and greater autonomous learning development. Full article
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20 pages, 5614 KiB  
Article
An Empirical Study of Students’ Perception of and Key Factors Affecting Overall Satisfaction in an Intensive Block Mode and Flipped Classroom
by Paul Kwan, Tayab D. Memon, Saad S. Hashmi, Flemming Rhode and Rajan Kadel
Educ. Sci. 2022, 12(8), 535; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12080535 - 09 Aug 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1794
Abstract
Results of recent studies have suggested that intensive methods of delivery might improve engagement, attendance, and achievement for students from diverse backgrounds. Contributing to this area of inquiry, this study assesses how students perceived their experience studying a certificate course that was delivered [...] Read more.
Results of recent studies have suggested that intensive methods of delivery might improve engagement, attendance, and achievement for students from diverse backgrounds. Contributing to this area of inquiry, this study assesses how students perceived their experience studying a certificate course that was delivered in an online intensive block mode and flipped classroom (BMFC), pedagogy amidst COVID-19 restrictions. The subjects were students enrolled at Melbourne Institute of Technology between July 2021 and January 2022 across four certificate courses, three at postgraduate and one at undergraduate level. These certificate courses differed from normal degree courses in several aspects: (a) a shorter 4-week (undergraduate) or 5-week (postgraduate), instead of a 12-week duration, (b) subjects were taken sequentially instead of concurrently as in a normal semester, (c) taught using an online flipped classroom rather than the in-class approach, and (d) open to both high-school leavers and mature aged students who did not study full-time. A questionnaire involving 10 perception-based questions was used to survey students’ satisfaction with the BMFC delivery, in relation to their learning and engagement experience. The mean, median, and mode calculated from the responses revealed that students regarded the BMFC approach as more satisfied than not on a 5-star rating scale in 7 out of the 10 questions. This is further supported by high correlations among the questions (the lowest at r = 0.48 and the highest at r = 0.87). Multiple regression analysis using the first nine questions as predictors of the 10th question (overall satisfaction) revealed that six of these are statistically significant predictors (p < 0.05) of the overall satisfaction, implying that an increase in the overall satisfaction can potentially be achieved by improving these key factors of the BMFC delivered certificate courses. Our findings correlate with existing research that student learning and engagement might be improved by intensive modes of delivery. Furthermore, the BMFC pedagogy proposed in our study differentiates us from existing research, where block scheduling was used only in a face-to-face delivery in pre COVID-19 environment. Our study, therefore, contributes a novel delivery method for learning and teaching that is suitable for both online and face-to-face mode in a post COVID-19 era. Full article
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