Identifying and Supporting Giftedness and Talent in Schools

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2023) | Viewed by 33863

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Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Educational Sciences, University of Helsinki, 00100 Helsinki, Finland
Interests: gifted education; talent development; teacher education; cross-cultural studies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Educational Studies, Karlstad University, 651 88 Karlstad, Sweden
Interests: gifted education; inclusion; early literacy; internationalisation in teacher education; early childhood education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In this Special Issue, we invite contributors to address the current challenges and opportunities in identifying and supporting gifted students in schools and early childhood education (ECE) settings. We take a holistic approach to education and invite papers that focus on cognitive, emotional, social, and moral domains concerning giftedness and talents. Countries differ in their educational provisions for gifted students, and we need to learn from each other on how to best meet the needs of gifted students. We welcome papers from different parts of the world to present their practices and approaches in teaching gifted students. We also need more research regarding teachers’ values, beliefs, and attitudes that influence their pedagogical decisions with high-achieving students and talent development. Inclusive education presents challenges on how to identify different gifts and talents and how to meet the needs of different learners in the same classroom. We welcome papers regarding inclusive education and the ways teachers can differentiate teaching in different subjects for gifted students or in transdisciplinary, holistic education. We also invite papers that consider acceleration and grouping that help gifted students to advance faster in their learning. Case studies concerning special programs and enrichment opportunities are also very suitable for the scope of this Special Issue.

We invite contributors to address the current challenges and opportunities in identifying and supporting gifted students in school and ECE in international contexts. The articles can be theoretical or empirical as long as they provide research-based knowledge to improve the teaching of gifted students globally.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Kirsi Tirri
Prof. Dr. Valerie Margrain
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • gifted education
  • talent development
  • school education
  • inclusive education
  • differentiation
  • international contexts

Published Papers (20 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 179 KiB  
Editorial
Identifying and Supporting Giftedness and Talent in Schools—Introduction to a Special Collection of Research
by Kirsi Tirri and Valerie Margrain
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(12), 1205; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13121205 - 03 Dec 2023
Viewed by 901
Abstract
This Special Issue on “Identifying and Supporting Giftedness and Talent in Schools” contains 19 articles from differing international contexts: Australia, Austria, Finland, France, Greece, Norway, Scotland, Sweden, Turkey, and the USA [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Identifying and Supporting Giftedness and Talent in Schools)

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

18 pages, 383 KiB  
Article
Talent Development Programs for Secondary Schools: Implementation and Evaluation of a Model School
by Gregor Jöstl, Sara Hinterplattner and Silke Rogl
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(12), 1172; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13121172 - 22 Nov 2023
Viewed by 881
Abstract
A school profile of talent development including model classes has been implemented at BG/BRG Keimgasse. This paper evaluates the impact of the actions taken by the school and compares the effects of both the model classes and the regular classes, with a school [...] Read more.
A school profile of talent development including model classes has been implemented at BG/BRG Keimgasse. This paper evaluates the impact of the actions taken by the school and compares the effects of both the model classes and the regular classes, with a school without a special focus on talent development. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence that the change in profile and teaching strategies had on both types of classes. This was conducted through initial qualitative interviews, followed up by quantitative questionnaires. It was found that the model classes had significantly higher scores in terms of school satisfaction, class climate, self-efficacy, mastery goal orientation, and in hope of successes, as well as scoring significantly lower on classroom pressure. This was achieved while shortening the education for the model-class students by one year and adding extracurricular activities. When comparing the regular classes at BG/BRG Keimgasse with classes from a regular school, the scores differed only slightly. This suggested that the concepts integrated at BG/BRG Keimgasse were successful in catering to the gifted students, without compromising the quality of the regular education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Identifying and Supporting Giftedness and Talent in Schools)
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24 pages, 338 KiB  
Article
On Being Twice Exceptional in Sweden—An Interview-Based Case Study about the Educational Situation for a Gifted Student Diagnosed with ADHD
by Anna-Carin Holmgren, Ylva Backman, Viktor Gardelli and Åsa Gyllefjord
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(11), 1120; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13111120 - 09 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1088
Abstract
The gifted education research area is rapidly expanding in Sweden. In the context of very limited research nationally, demands are increasing for steering documents and addressing of student and teacher needs in practice. However, Swedish research on students that are ‘twice exceptional’—students classified [...] Read more.
The gifted education research area is rapidly expanding in Sweden. In the context of very limited research nationally, demands are increasing for steering documents and addressing of student and teacher needs in practice. However, Swedish research on students that are ‘twice exceptional’—students classified as being both gifted and disabled (for instance, through a neurodevelopmental disorder such as ADHD)—is nearly non-existent. In this study, we present an exploratory single case study of a female student in school year seven based on semi-structured individual interviews with the student and her two guardians regarding her educational situation. The data were first inductively coded and triangulated in collaboration between three of the authors. A fourth author later independently and deductively coded one-third of the data based on the previously inductively determined thematic structure and conducted a consensus interrater reliability check, exceeding 85% percent agreement. The three main themes are as follows: (1) multiplex perspectives on academic outcomes and expectations, (2) the intersection between twice exceptionality and academic work, and (3) information and perceptions about twice exceptionality. The results indicate several educational challenges and opportunities for twice exceptional students. Further research is needed regarding twice exceptional students in Sweden. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Identifying and Supporting Giftedness and Talent in Schools)
21 pages, 1074 KiB  
Article
Motivational Profiles of High Achievers in Mathematics: Relations with Metacognitive Processes and Achievement Emotions
by Dimitrios Moustakas and Eleftheria Ν. Gonida
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(10), 970; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13100970 - 23 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 868
Abstract
The current study aimed to explore alternative motivational profiles of high achievers in Mathematics, within the framework of the Situated Expectancy-Value Theory. Furthermore, it aimed to examine the profiles’ potential differences in relation to self-reported metacognitive processes, such as metacognitive awareness and experiences, [...] Read more.
The current study aimed to explore alternative motivational profiles of high achievers in Mathematics, within the framework of the Situated Expectancy-Value Theory. Furthermore, it aimed to examine the profiles’ potential differences in relation to self-reported metacognitive processes, such as metacognitive awareness and experiences, and achievement emotions related to Mathematics. A comprehensive evaluation in Mathematics was conducted on a total of 492 ninth-graders, including students from regular junior high schools, experimental junior high schools, and an academically advanced summer program. The assessment involved a battery of school-type mathematical tasks, resulting in the identification of 141 high achievers. Cluster analysis, based on students’ expectancies for success, subjective value, and perceived cost in relation to Mathematics, revealed five motivational profiles labeled as follows: Cluster 1: Higher Motivation; Cluster 2: Higher Expectancies, Value, and Cost; Cluster 3: Lower Expectancies; Cluster 4: Lower Value; Cluster 5: Lower Motivation. Differences were found among the five profiles in terms of students’ reported metacognitive awareness and their emotions of enjoyment, pride, anxiety, shame, and boredom toward Mathematics. Students with the Higher Motivation profile appeared to be the most adaptive across all of the examined variables, while students with the Lower Motivation profile reported less favorable levels of motivational and affective variables than most others. However, high achievers did not differ significantly regarding their metacognitive accuracy. Examination of the gender distribution within the clusters did not reveal any differences in gender representation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Identifying and Supporting Giftedness and Talent in Schools)
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14 pages, 602 KiB  
Article
Underrepresented Students in Gifted and Talented Education: Using Positive Psychology to Identify and Serve
by Karen B. Arnstein, Ophélie Allyssa Desmet, Kristen Seward, Anne Traynor and F. Richard Olenchak
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(9), 955; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13090955 - 19 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1552
Abstract
The representation gap in gifted and talented education poses a persistent challenge in educational systems worldwide. This theoretical manuscript presents the Bull’s Eye Model for Affective Development—Expansion (BEM-e) an innovative framework designed to address this gap. By incorporating elements from positive psychology, the [...] Read more.
The representation gap in gifted and talented education poses a persistent challenge in educational systems worldwide. This theoretical manuscript presents the Bull’s Eye Model for Affective Development—Expansion (BEM-e) an innovative framework designed to address this gap. By incorporating elements from positive psychology, the BEM-e aims to identify and nurture traditionally underrepresented students who possess camouflaged gifted and talented abilities. Drawing upon the Engagement, Perseverance, Optimism, Connectedness, and Happiness model (EPOCH), along with measures of hope and metacognition, BEM-e provides a comprehensive approach to talent identification and service. The model emphasizes the holistic development of individuals by considering affective factors, engagement, perseverance, optimism, connectedness, happiness, hope, and metacognition. Additionally, dynamic assessment is integrated during the implementation of BEM-e modules, allowing for personalized and adaptive identification processes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Identifying and Supporting Giftedness and Talent in Schools)
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17 pages, 604 KiB  
Article
Assessment and Gifted Discourse in Swedish Early Years Education Steering Documents: The Problem of (In)Visibility
by Valerie Margrain and Jorryt van Bommel
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(9), 904; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13090904 - 07 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1442
Abstract
This study explores how assessment is presented in Swedish early years’ steering documents and considers risks for young gifted students in relation to assessment (or lack thereof). Document analysis was undertaken on, firstly, Swedish curriculum documents for the preschool and for the compulsory [...] Read more.
This study explores how assessment is presented in Swedish early years’ steering documents and considers risks for young gifted students in relation to assessment (or lack thereof). Document analysis was undertaken on, firstly, Swedish curriculum documents for the preschool and for the compulsory school, and secondly, mapping materials used in the preschool class with six-year-old children. Results show that assessment is not a term used in Swedish early years curricula. Instead, preschool teachers are asked to evaluate their own practice; preschool class teachers are asked to engage with mapping and only to consider working toward later assessment goals in year 3 of school. A plethora of alternative assessment terms are used in the curriculum without definition. Giftedness is also invisible in the curriculum. However, the mapping materials used with six-year-old students in the subject areas of mathematics and Swedish do encourage teachers to consider children who achieve mastery early. Further, these materials provide supportive questions and activities for teachers to use in exploring further. The specific examples of assessment discourses and the need to consider gifted children are combined in this article to highlight aspects of teacher work that are important for the educational rights of an often-forgotten group of learners. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Identifying and Supporting Giftedness and Talent in Schools)
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15 pages, 546 KiB  
Article
Climate Competencies of Finnish Gifted and Average-Ability High School Students
by Sakari Tolppanen, Jingoo Kang and Kirsi Tirri
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(8), 840; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13080840 - 17 Aug 2023
Viewed by 845
Abstract
In the face of global issues such as climate change, the world needs action competent, transformationally gifted citizens, who are willing to step up and take responsibility for a better future. However, empirical evidence on what supports the development of transformational giftedness is [...] Read more.
In the face of global issues such as climate change, the world needs action competent, transformationally gifted citizens, who are willing to step up and take responsibility for a better future. However, empirical evidence on what supports the development of transformational giftedness is limited. Furthermore, the relationship between academic giftedness and transformational giftedness has not been clearly pronounced. The purpose of this study is to address this research gap by examining students’ climate competencies. A total of 1703 students from five Finnish high schools (grades 10–12) participated in this study. Using a questionnaire, students’ climate change knowledge, values, willingness to take action, sense of responsibility, environmental concern, and perceptions on how climate change issues are dealt with in school were examined. Four of the schools were general education high schools, while one was for students formally identified as gifted students. The findings indicate that academically gifted students in both general education schools and the gifted school show more climate competencies than average-ability students. Furthermore, gifted students that attended the school for gifted students show more climate competencies than the gifted students from general education schools. Based on the findings, the paper discusses how the development of transformational giftedness can be better supported in education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Identifying and Supporting Giftedness and Talent in Schools)
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13 pages, 285 KiB  
Article
A Small Country with Big Ambitions: Does This Include the Gifted?
by Margaret Sutherland and Catherine Reid
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(8), 832; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13080832 - 16 Aug 2023
Viewed by 2093
Abstract
Scotland is a small country with an education system whose roots lie within an inclusive and egalitarian approach to the education of young people. Subsequent legislation, policies, and curriculum frameworks have been influenced by this, and also by the international move toward equitable, [...] Read more.
Scotland is a small country with an education system whose roots lie within an inclusive and egalitarian approach to the education of young people. Subsequent legislation, policies, and curriculum frameworks have been influenced by this, and also by the international move toward equitable, inclusive, and quality lifelong learning for all. Supporting those who are highly able/gifted and talented against such a backdrop offers both opportunities and challenges. In this qualitative study, the Global Principles for Professional Learning in Gifted Education are used to interrogate recent key legislation; the current curriculum framework, Curriculum for Excellence, and the National Framework for Inclusion; to ascertain the extent to which this inclusive approach, on paper, affords in-class and school-based support for gifted and talented/highly able learners. The results indicate that the legislative and policy frameworks coalesce with the Global Principles. While legislation does not change practice, it does influence and shape practice, and so can be used as a springboard for developing dynamic, culturally appropriate opportunities for Scotland’s gifted young people. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Identifying and Supporting Giftedness and Talent in Schools)
23 pages, 1201 KiB  
Article
Top Achievers in Mathematics in the End of Upper Secondary School
by Laura Niemi, Jari Metsämuuronen, Markku S. Hannula and Anu Laine
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(8), 775; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13080775 - 28 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1295
Abstract
Important questions regarding mathematical giftedness are how and when it is possible to identify. To be identified as gifted, the student must have natural potential but also an appropriate mix of motivation, support, and challenges. This study is based on longitudinal data following [...] Read more.
Important questions regarding mathematical giftedness are how and when it is possible to identify. To be identified as gifted, the student must have natural potential but also an appropriate mix of motivation, support, and challenges. This study is based on longitudinal data following students from 3rd grade in primary school to the end of upper secondary school between 2005 and 2015. We focus on top achievers (<2% of age cohort) of the national mathematics final exam at the end of upper secondary school. We investigate how accurately top achievers at the end of secondary school can be identified in 3rd, 6th, and 9th grades using national tests. We identify mathematical tasks that predict future top achievement and analyze how attitudes, gender, and parental background factors relate to high proficiency. Most top achievers had already been identified by 3rd grade and almost all of them by 9th grade. However, recognizing future top achievers was not very accurate, as they were indistinguishable from many students whose performance did not reach the same level over time. The best predictor for future top achievement was a student’s ability to solve non-routine and atypical tasks in early school years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Identifying and Supporting Giftedness and Talent in Schools)
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22 pages, 656 KiB  
Article
Adapted Education for Gifted Students in Norway: A Mixed Methods Study
by Astrid Lenvik, Lise Øen Jones and Elisabeth Hesjedal
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(8), 774; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13080774 - 28 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1346
Abstract
In this article, we describe the mixed methods research (i.e., quantitative survey and qualitative interviews) we conducted to investigate adapted education for gifted students in Norway. The survey results showed that the teachers (n = 132) used differentiation strategies and agreed that [...] Read more.
In this article, we describe the mixed methods research (i.e., quantitative survey and qualitative interviews) we conducted to investigate adapted education for gifted students in Norway. The survey results showed that the teachers (n = 132) used differentiation strategies and agreed that gifted students need an adapted education that extends beyond the regular curriculum. We identified three themes related to adapted education based on an analysis of the student interview data (n = 17, aged 12–15) and four themes based on an analysis of the teachers’ responses to the open-ended survey question regarding adapted education. We also investigated similarities and differences between teacher and student themes: both groups reported similar enrichment strategies applied within adapted education and similar barriers and systematic challenges to its facilitation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Identifying and Supporting Giftedness and Talent in Schools)
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16 pages, 704 KiB  
Article
How Does an Inquiry-Based Instructional Approach Predict the STEM Creative Productivity of Specialized Science High School Students?
by Juah Kim, Hyunjung Im, Doehee Ahn and Seokhee Cho
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(8), 773; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13080773 - 28 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 998
Abstract
Creative productivity has not been studied much as an outcome of specialized science high schools. Rather, STEM career choices, acquisition of a STEM degree, and taking advanced STEM courses were taken as outcomes. This study examined whether the inquiry-based instructional approaches experienced by [...] Read more.
Creative productivity has not been studied much as an outcome of specialized science high schools. Rather, STEM career choices, acquisition of a STEM degree, and taking advanced STEM courses were taken as outcomes. This study examined whether the inquiry-based instructional approaches experienced by students predict their creative productivity and whether its effects are mediated through co-cognitive factors, school engagement, and school GPA. This study is part of a national longitudinal study about students from Science Academies, a type of specialized science high school in South Korea. A total of 599 students at Science Academies were surveyed on experiences of inquiry-based instructional approaches, co-cognitive factors, school engagement, and school GPA in math and science in their second year, and on creative productivity in their last year at Science Academies. Creative productivity was measured by the number of awards received from STEM competitions for research, problem solving, or projects. Confirmatory factor analyses confirmed the convergent validity of the measurement model. Structural equation modeling analysis and bootstrapping analysis revealed the direct, indirect, and total effects of inquiry-based instructional approaches on creative productivity. Inquiry-based instructional approaches experienced by students at Science Academies had a sequentially positive impact on co-cognitive factors, school engagement, and school GPA, ultimately contributing to creative productivity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Identifying and Supporting Giftedness and Talent in Schools)
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23 pages, 1834 KiB  
Article
Teachers’ Beliefs and Their Influence on Math Instructions for Gifted English Learners
by Jenny Yang, Gülnur Özbek and Seokhee Cho
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(7), 728; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13070728 - 17 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1549
Abstract
The dynamic interplay between teachers’ beliefs and practices significantly impact the quality of instruction and the trajectory of talent development in young students. This case study explores the beliefs and practices of two elementary teachers instructing gifted ELs in mathematics. The constant comparison [...] Read more.
The dynamic interplay between teachers’ beliefs and practices significantly impact the quality of instruction and the trajectory of talent development in young students. This case study explores the beliefs and practices of two elementary teachers instructing gifted ELs in mathematics. The constant comparison method was used to analyze data collected from classroom observations, semi-structured interviews, and field notes. Three factors were found to affect the (in)consistency between teachers’ expressed beliefs and observed practices: compatibility among core and peripheral beliefs, knowledge about evidence-based practices, and classroom management skills. Students exhibit higher levels of participation, communication, and engagement in critical thinking skills when their teacher embraces constructive perspectives in teaching mathematics, demonstrates pedagogical expertise, and employs a proactive classroom management approach. Conversely, students encounter restricted opportunities to independently construct their own understanding of mathematics when their teacher holds maladaptive beliefs about teaching mathematics, has limited knowledge of evidence-based practices, and has an authoritarian classroom management style. These findings underscore the need for a new approach to professional development (PD) that encourages teachers to critically examine the connection between their beliefs and instructional practices and their impact on the student’s mathematical talent development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Identifying and Supporting Giftedness and Talent in Schools)
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17 pages, 323 KiB  
Article
Intersectional Program Evaluation: Considering Race, Class, Sex, and Language in Gifted Program Effectiveness
by Tristta M. Kuykendall
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(7), 719; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13070719 - 14 Jul 2023
Viewed by 801
Abstract
Gifted education is an effective intervention for high-ability students who need more academic challenges. However, the relationship between program effectiveness and demographic categories has been scantly evaluated. Research focused on the effectiveness of gifted education infrequently considers the intersections of ability, race, sex, [...] Read more.
Gifted education is an effective intervention for high-ability students who need more academic challenges. However, the relationship between program effectiveness and demographic categories has been scantly evaluated. Research focused on the effectiveness of gifted education infrequently considers the intersections of ability, race, sex, socioeconomic status, and language. To fill this gap, I used an ex post facto quasi-experimental design to conduct a cross-sectional evaluation of gifted service models at the intersections of cultural identity groups in Ohio. Findings underscore the relationship between the type of gifted service model and achievement on standardized math test scores varying across demographic groups. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Identifying and Supporting Giftedness and Talent in Schools)
14 pages, 580 KiB  
Article
Interdisciplinary Insights That Reveal Contextual Influences on the Development of Giftedness and Talent
by Don Ambrose
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(7), 690; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13070690 - 07 Jul 2023
Viewed by 831
Abstract
There are powerful, hidden contextual influences that strengthen, weaken, or distort the discovery of aspirations and the development of talents in gifted individuals. These influences can be hidden from gifted individuals and their teachers and mentors because they are not sufficiently addressed in [...] Read more.
There are powerful, hidden contextual influences that strengthen, weaken, or distort the discovery of aspirations and the development of talents in gifted individuals. These influences can be hidden from gifted individuals and their teachers and mentors because they are not sufficiently addressed in the gifted education research literature. This analysis highlights and describes examples of contextual influences that emerge from phenomena studied by scholars in a wide variety of fields. After these examples are presented and clarified, recommendations for educators and scholars of the gifted are provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Identifying and Supporting Giftedness and Talent in Schools)
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17 pages, 308 KiB  
Article
“It May Be a Luxury, but Not a Problem”: A Mixed Methods Study of Teachers’ Attitudes towards the Educational Needs of Gifted Students in Norway
by Gila Hammer Furnes and Gunnvi Sæle Jokstad
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(7), 667; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13070667 - 30 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1456
Abstract
This study aims to investigate Norwegian primary teachers’ attitudes towards gifted students and gifted education and discuss their potential impact on their pedagogical practices. In Norway, gifted education is a relatively non-existent phenomenon, and this research field has been scarcely explored in the [...] Read more.
This study aims to investigate Norwegian primary teachers’ attitudes towards gifted students and gifted education and discuss their potential impact on their pedagogical practices. In Norway, gifted education is a relatively non-existent phenomenon, and this research field has been scarcely explored in the Norwegian context and teacher education. The Official Norwegian Report NOU 2016:14 highlights a reluctance among Norwegian teachers to cater to gifted students, indicates a lack of training for teachers in identifying and differentiating gifted education, and points out a need for more research within the Norwegian context. In an earlier study, we showed that Norwegian teachers reported having little formal or non-formal education on the theme of gifted education and that few were aware of the abovementioned report. This study aims to investigate Norwegian primary teachers’ attitudes towards gifted students and gifted education and discuss their potential impact on their pedagogical practices. Data in the study are collected through an online mixed methods survey in a small municipality in Norway. An interesting finding is that culture significantly influences teachers’ attitudes towards gifted education. We argue that teachers’ attitudes should be more informed by evidence-based practice and less by culture, as it can impact gifted students’ access to equal and adapted education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Identifying and Supporting Giftedness and Talent in Schools)
19 pages, 269 KiB  
Article
Non-Native Gifted Students in a Finnish Teacher Training School: A Case Study
by Jessica Stargardter, Sonja Laine and Kirsi Tirri
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(7), 659; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13070659 - 28 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1345
Abstract
It is a global challenge to meet the needs of non-native gifted students in the classroom. This case study investigates how Finland, a country with a high-achieving school system and a growing multicultural student population, serves its non-native gifted students. In interviews at [...] Read more.
It is a global challenge to meet the needs of non-native gifted students in the classroom. This case study investigates how Finland, a country with a high-achieving school system and a growing multicultural student population, serves its non-native gifted students. In interviews at a Finnish teacher training school, non-native gifted students and their parents and teachers described their school experiences. The interviews were analyzed for patterns in two categories: instructional strategies and curriculum design. The findings highlight the fact that Finland’s education system is based on egalitarian approaches to learning in inclusive educational settings. The results show that teachers are differentiating for their gifted students and parents and students recognize this. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Identifying and Supporting Giftedness and Talent in Schools)
9 pages, 229 KiB  
Article
Identification and Education of Students with Gifts and Talents Based on the Fuzzy Conception of Giftedness
by Ugur Sak
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(6), 562; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13060562 - 30 May 2023
Viewed by 1397
Abstract
The purpose of this article is to review the Fuzzy Conception of Giftedness (FCG) and discuss its implications for the identification and education of gifted students. According to the Fuzzy Conception of Giftedness, the manifestation of giftedness results from the interplay between personal [...] Read more.
The purpose of this article is to review the Fuzzy Conception of Giftedness (FCG) and discuss its implications for the identification and education of gifted students. According to the Fuzzy Conception of Giftedness, the manifestation of giftedness results from the interplay between personal dispositions and stimulus conditions; thus, giftedness exists in the interaction between a person and the environment (e.g., stimulus conditions). While a person is disposed to carry out actions, the environment is potent to allow these actions. In line with this proposition, the identification and education of gifted students should be built on interactions. Interactive models are useful to identify and educate students who have overachievement potential. The FCG proposes three components to define giftedness that could be used in identifying and educating gifted students: intellective and non-intellective dispositions, stimulus conditions, and interaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Identifying and Supporting Giftedness and Talent in Schools)
17 pages, 789 KiB  
Article
Feelings about School in Gifted and Non-Gifted Children: What Are the Effects of a Fine Art Program in Primary School?
by Christine Sanchez and Nathalie Blanc
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(5), 512; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13050512 - 18 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1846
Abstract
There is a consensus about the benefits of an artistic activity on health and well-being. In France, a gifted child is considered a special needs student for whom enrichment is advocated. Therefore, this study examines the extent to which a whole-class art enrichment [...] Read more.
There is a consensus about the benefits of an artistic activity on health and well-being. In France, a gifted child is considered a special needs student for whom enrichment is advocated. Therefore, this study examines the extent to which a whole-class art enrichment program delivered to both gifted and non-gifted children benefits both student populations with respect to their school well-being. The art program was implemented in classrooms over the course of an entire school year (during the COVID-19 pandemic). The self-report French version of the Feelings About School scale (i.e., FAS) was completed in three steps (i.e., before, mid-program, and after) by a sample of gifted and non-gifted children benefiting from the program. The FAS scores of those students were also compared at the end of the school year with those of students who did not participate in the art program. Despite the pandemic context that requires caution in drawing definite conclusions, this study supports that (i) the fine arts practice is a lever of development, (ii) the sanitary situation was detrimental for elementary school students, and (iii) better adaptive capacities were exhibited by gifted children in this context. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Identifying and Supporting Giftedness and Talent in Schools)
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17 pages, 604 KiB  
Article
The Fallacy of Using the National Assessment Program–Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) Data to Identify Australian High-Potential Gifted Students
by Michelle Ronksley-Pavia
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(4), 421; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13040421 - 20 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 5326
Abstract
In Australia, gifted or talented students are defined according to the widely accepted model proposed by Gagné, where giftedness is understood as potential, and talent is shown through competencies (or achievements); in this definition there is a clear differentiation between the two constructs. [...] Read more.
In Australia, gifted or talented students are defined according to the widely accepted model proposed by Gagné, where giftedness is understood as potential, and talent is shown through competencies (or achievements); in this definition there is a clear differentiation between the two constructs. Most Australian education jurisdictions espouse Gagné’s definitions and use a variety of mechanisms for identifying gifted and talented students—a commonly used identification practice is the results from the Australian National Assessment Program–Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) test. This article sets out to explore the fallacy of using the NAPLAN results to identify giftedness in high-potential (gifted) students in Australia, outlining key reasons why the NAPLAN is unsuitable as an identification instrument for giftedness. Moreover, it explores the erroneous use of the NAPLAN as an identification tool for giftedness when it was never designed, validated, or intended as such an instrument. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Identifying and Supporting Giftedness and Talent in Schools)
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Review

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22 pages, 662 KiB  
Review
Transforming Gifted Education in Schools: Practical Applications of a Comprehensive Framework for Developing Academic Talent
by Rena F. Subotnik, Paula Olszewski-Kubilius, Susan Corwith, Eric Calvert and Frank C. Worrell
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(7), 707; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13070707 - 12 Jul 2023
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Abstract
The foundation for talent development as a framework for gifted education can be found in a synthesis of the psychological literature on creativity, eminence, giftedness, and high performance. The talent development framework acknowledges the contributions of both general cognitive ability and domain-specific abilities [...] Read more.
The foundation for talent development as a framework for gifted education can be found in a synthesis of the psychological literature on creativity, eminence, giftedness, and high performance. The talent development framework acknowledges the contributions of both general cognitive ability and domain-specific abilities to achievement, as well as the malleability of these ability constructs. Talent development is also consistent with research on the contributions of non-cognitive or psychosocial factors to school achievement, as well as studies on factors that influence the attainment of scholarly productivity and artistry within specific domains of non-academic talent. Although there are several theoretical frameworks and models of giftedness, talent development, ability, and intelligence, each with varied areas of emphasis and desired outcomes, the research base and practical applications for the talent development megamodel (TDMM) can serve as a guide to leaders and school administrators in making fiscal and programmatic decisions that maximize short- and long-term impacts for individuals and society. In this article, we discuss some of the practical implications of the model for assessment, curriculum and instruction, and psychosocial development within a school context. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Identifying and Supporting Giftedness and Talent in Schools)
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