Bacterial Symbionts of Invertebrates: Diversity, Transmission and Impacts

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818). This special issue belongs to the section "Microbial Diversity and Culture Collections".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 7401

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Invertebrate Zoology and Hydrobiology, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, University of Lodz, 90-237 Lodz, Poland
2. Department of Evolutionary Genetics and Biosystematics, Faculty of Biology, University of Gdansk, 80-308 Gdansk, Poland
Interests: bacterial endosymbionts; conservation biology; genetic diversity; host-symbiont coevolution; microbial communities; molecular evolution; molecular taxonomy

E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Biology, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, 61-614 Poznan, Poland
Interests: bacterial endosymbionts of Arhropoda; bacteria in plant protection against insect pests

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We cordially invite you to contribute to this Special Issue of Diversity, entitled “Bacterial Symbionts of Invertebrate: Diversity, Transmission and Impacts”. Understanding the biology and ecology of invertebrate hosts requires an understanding of their bacterial associates. Symbiosis between bacterial symbionts (including endosymbionts) and a host can be beneficial to both partners. Animal hosts have evolved in a world teeming with microbes that play pivotal roles in their health, development, pathogen defense, nutrition, reproduction and evolution. Symbionts also influence invertebrate ecology, reproduction and evolution, promoting speciation, affecting ecological tolerances, etc. For example, over the course of evolution, bacterial symbionts may have induced several reproductive phenotypes in their hosts, including feminization, early and late male killing, parthenogenesis or cytoplasmic incompatibility. Prolonged and intimate associations between hosts and bacteria are ubiquitous in nature and occur in a variety of different forms; e.g., parasitic, commensal and mutualistic symbioses are widespread. Knowledge of this association currently allows applying the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia as a biocontrol agent for the transmission of arboviral infections such as Zika, dengue and other viruses by manipulating the reproduction of mosquito hosts.

Symbionts of invertebrates are represented by a variety of bacterial species, including culturable and unculturable microorganisms transmitted horizontally or vertically. These include Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria with different cell shapes, diverse genetic identities and phylogenetic relationships. Interestingly, the occurrence of (endo)symbionts in invertebrates is much more widespread than previously thought. This implies that more extensive sequencing may yield many more new infection cases in new host taxa, with the prospect of reversing our understanding of host-–bacterial species coevolution. This Special Issue aims to build a community of authors and readers documenting the latest research on the biodiversity of bacterial symbionts in invertebrates and the richness of interconnections between microbial organisms and their hosts.

Dr. Monika Mioduchowska
Dr. Edyta Konecka
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • bacterial (endo)symbionts
  • genetic diversity 
  • holobiont 
  • host–symbiont interaction 
  • metagenomics 
  • microbial ecology, communities and structure 
  • microbiome 
  • pathogenicity 
  • molecular evolution 
  • phylogeny

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 1497 KiB  
Article
Diversity and Regional Variation of Endosymbionts in the Green Peach Aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer)
by Qiong Yang, Paul A. Umina, Shujun Wei, Chris Bass, Wenjuan Yu, Katie L. Robinson, Alex Gill, Dongwu Zhan, Samantha E. Ward, Anthony van Rooyen and Ary A. Hoffmann
Diversity 2023, 15(2), 206; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15020206 - 1 Feb 2023
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2130
Abstract
The green peach aphid, Myzus persicae, is globally distributed and an important pest of many economically valuable food crops, largely due to its ability to transmit plant viruses. Almost all aphids, including M. persicae, carry the obligate symbiont Buchnera aphidicola, [...] Read more.
The green peach aphid, Myzus persicae, is globally distributed and an important pest of many economically valuable food crops, largely due to its ability to transmit plant viruses. Almost all aphids, including M. persicae, carry the obligate symbiont Buchnera aphidicola, which provides essential amino acids that aphids cannot obtain from the phloem of plants themselves. Many aphids also harbor facultative (secondary) endosymbionts, which provide benefits under specific ecological conditions. In this study, we screened for secondary endosymbionts in M. persicae, with a particular focus on Australian populations where this species is growing in status as a major agricultural pest. We compared 37 Australian M. persicae populations with other populations, including 21 field populations from China and 15 clones from the UK, France, Italy, Greece, USA, Spain, South Korea, Chile, Japan and Zimbabwe. No secondary endosymbionts were identified in M. persicae samples outside of China, despite samples covering a wide geographic range and being collected from several host plant families. We detected two secondary endosymbionts (Rickettsia, Spiroplasma) in Chinese samples, although diversity appeared lower than detected in a recent study. We also found very high clonal diversity in Chinese samples based on DNA microsatellite markers in comparison with lower clonal diversity from Australia. These patterns may indicate a higher diversity of secondary endosymbionts (and clonal diversity) in the native range of M. persicae when compared to its invasive range. Full article
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13 pages, 1862 KiB  
Article
Analyses of the Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Paraconiothyrium sp. and Gene Rearrangement Diversity in the Pleosporales
by Jiaqi An, Chunli Fan, Zuoyi Fu, Hongping Zhang and Pu Yang
Diversity 2022, 14(8), 601; https://doi.org/10.3390/d14080601 - 28 Jul 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1820
Abstract
The Pleosporales is the most predominant order in the Dothideomycetes class, which contains over 4700 species that function in a variety of ways. The material used in this research was previously isolated from the Chinese white wax scale insect, and it was determined [...] Read more.
The Pleosporales is the most predominant order in the Dothideomycetes class, which contains over 4700 species that function in a variety of ways. The material used in this research was previously isolated from the Chinese white wax scale insect, and it was determined to be a Paraconiothyrium genus species that belonged to the Pleosporales order. For further molecular analysis, we assembled the complete mitochondrial genome of Paraconiothyrium sp. based on short reads of BGISEQ sequencing and subreads from Pacbio sequencing. The results showed that it was 42,734 bp in length and contained 8 open reading frames, 12 protein-coding genes and 31 non-coding genes. Phylogenetic analysis showed it was affiliated to the Pleosporales order and formed a sister relationship with Pithomyces chartarum. Compared to the seven other species in the Pleosporales order, Paraconiothyrium sp. has generally conserved gene content and structure, while the homologous blocks and gene order were shown to be significantly rearranged, in accordance with the species diversity in the Pleosporales order. In this study, we presented the first mitochondrial genome of Paraconiothyrium fungi to be reported, and we also showed gene order diversity in the Pleosporales order. These findings will lay the foundation for further species studies regarding molecular diversity and our understanding of species characteristics in the Paraconiothyrium genus. Full article
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Review

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20 pages, 390 KiB  
Review
The Importance and Impact of Francisella-like Endosymbionts in Hyalomma Ticks in the Era of Climate Change
by Celia Sesmero-García, Marta Dafne Cabanero-Navalon and Victor Garcia-Bustos
Diversity 2023, 15(4), 562; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15040562 - 17 Apr 2023
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Abstract
Ticks are obligatory hematophagous parasites that serve as vectors for a large amount of important human and livestock pathogens around the world, and their distribution and incidence of tick-associated diseases are currently increasing because of environmental biomass being modified by both climate change [...] Read more.
Ticks are obligatory hematophagous parasites that serve as vectors for a large amount of important human and livestock pathogens around the world, and their distribution and incidence of tick-associated diseases are currently increasing because of environmental biomass being modified by both climate change and other human activities. Hyalomma species are of major concern for public health, due to their important role as vectors of several diseases such as the Crimea–Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus in humans or theileriosis in cattle. Characterizing the Hyalomma-associated microbiota and delving into the complex interactions between ticks and their bacterial endosymbionts for host survival, development, and pathogen transmission are fundamental, as it may provide new insights and spawn new paradigms to control tick-borne diseases. Francisella-like endosymbionts (FLEs) have recently gained importance, not only as a consequence of the public health concerns of the highly transmissible Francisella tularensis, but for the essential role of FLEs in tick homeostasis. In this comprehensive review, we discuss the growing importance of ticks associated with the genus Hyalomma, their associated tick-borne human and animal diseases in the era of climate change, as well as the role of the microbiome and the FLE in their ecology. We compile current evidence from around the world on FLEs in Hyalomma species and examine the impact of new molecular techniques in the study of tick microbiomes (both in research and in clinical practice). Lastly, we also discuss different endosymbiont-directed strategies for the control of tick populations and tick-borne diseases, providing insights into new evidence-based opportunities for the future. Full article
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