Feature Papers in Dentistry Journal in 2021

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2022) | Viewed by 44711

Special Issue Editors

Department for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery, University Hospital Basel, Spitalstrasse 21, CH-4031 Basel, Switzerland
Interests: implantology; oral surgery; oral and maxillofacial surgery; jaw malpositions and craniofacial anomalies
* Doctoral Degree in Dental Medicine; Doctoral Degree in Medicine
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Clinic of Conservative and Preventive Dentistry, University of Zurich, Plattenstrasse 11, CH-8032 Zürich, Switzerland
Interests: dental implant; periodontitis; guided tissue regeneration; adhesive dentistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As Editor-in-Chief and Associate Editor-in-Chief of the Dentistry Journal, we are glad to announce this Special Issue on “Feature Papers in Dentistry Journal in 2021”. In the past several years, we have cooperated with some excellent scholars/scientific groups and published several very important high-level works that have already been cited various times. Our aim now is to introduce new insights into scientific innovations, clinical and experimental research, or cutting-edge technology within the whole field of dentistry and its related fields that will make a significant contribution to the community.

Additionally, Dentistry Journal has just been indexed in ESCI (Web of Science), and we launched such a feature paper Special Issue in 2021. We will strictly select 10–20 high-quality papers from Editorial Board Members, or excellent scholars invited by the Editorial Office and the Editor-in-Chief.

You are welcome to send short proposals for submissions of Feature Papers to our Editorial Office (dentistry@mdpi.com) before submission.

These will firstly be evaluated by our Editors. Please note that selected full papers will still be subject to a thorough and rigorous peer review.

Prof. Dr. Claude Jaquiéry
Prof. Dr. Patrick R. Schmidlin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Oral Biology and Dental Diseases
  • Oral Microbiology
  • Oral Diagnosis
  • Prevention, Oral Epidemiology, and Health
  • Periodontology
  • Endodontology and Traumatology
  • Operative Dentistry
  • CAD/CAM Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics
  • Dental Biomaterials Science
  • Orthodontics
  • Pediatric Dentistry
  • Dental Implantology
  • Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
  • Medical Emergencies in Dentistry

Published Papers (13 papers)

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Research

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8 pages, 1808 KiB  
Article
An In-Vitro Evaluation of Articulation Accuracy for Digitally Milled Models vs. Conventional Gypsum Casts
Dent. J. 2022, 10(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj10010011 - 11 Jan 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3410
Abstract
With the advent of a digital workflow in dentistry, the inter-occlusal articulation of digital models is now possible through various means. The Cadent iTero intraoral scanner uses a buccal scan in maximum intercuspation to record the maxillomandibular relationship. This in-vitro study compares the [...] Read more.
With the advent of a digital workflow in dentistry, the inter-occlusal articulation of digital models is now possible through various means. The Cadent iTero intraoral scanner uses a buccal scan in maximum intercuspation to record the maxillomandibular relationship. This in-vitro study compares the occlusion derived from conventionally articulated stone casts versus that of digitally articulated quadrant milled models. Thirty sets of stone casts poured from full arch polyvinyl siloxane impressions (Group A) and thirty sets of polyurethane quadrant models milled from digital impressions (Group B) were used for this study. The full arch stone casts were hand-articulated and mounted on semi-adjustable articulators, while the digitally derived models were pre-mounted from the milling center based on the data obtained from the buccal scanning procedure. A T-scan sensor was used to obtain a bite registration from each set of models in both groups. The T-scan data derived from groups A and B were compared to that from the master model to evaluate the reproducibility of the occlusion in the two groups. A statistically significant difference of the contact region surface area was found on #11 of the digitally articulated models compared to the master. An analysis of the force distribution also showed a tendency for a heavier distribution on the more anterior #11 tooth for the digitally articulated models. Within the limitations of this study, the use of a digitally articulated quadrant model system may result in a loss of accuracy, in terms of occlusion, the further anteriorly the tooth to be restored is located. Care must be taken to consider the sources of inaccuracies in the digital workflow to minimize them for a more efficient and effective restorative process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Dentistry Journal in 2021)
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9 pages, 247 KiB  
Article
Risk Indicators and Treatment Needs of Children 2–5 Years of Age Receiving Dental Treatment under General Anesthesia in Saskatchewan
Dent. J. 2022, 10(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj10010008 - 06 Jan 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2582
Abstract
Background: When compared to national averages in Canada, Saskatchewan has one of the highest rates of dental treatment under general anesthesia (GA) and average costs per child. Thus, the purpose of this cross-sectional study is to explore the risk indicators and treatment needs [...] Read more.
Background: When compared to national averages in Canada, Saskatchewan has one of the highest rates of dental treatment under general anesthesia (GA) and average costs per child. Thus, the purpose of this cross-sectional study is to explore the risk indicators and treatment needs of children receiving dental treatment under GA in Saskatchewan. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we recruited caregivers of children between 24 and 71 months of age in Saskatoon, Canada. Caregivers completed a 40-item questionnaire, which was supplemented with clinical data and then subject to statistical analysis (independent t-tests and one-way ANOVA). Results: A total of 90 caregiver/child dyads were enrolled with the mean age for children being 49.5 ± 12.3 months. The mean age of a child’s first dental visit was 34.7 ± 15.3 months with only 37.9% of children having a dental home. The mean deft index was 11.7 ± 3.4, with an average of 10.9 ± 3.5 teeth receiving treatment. Additionally, location of primary residence (p = 0.03), family income (p = 0.04), family size (p = 0.01), parental education (p = 0.03), dental home (p = 0.04), and body mass index (p = 0.04) had a statistically significant association with a higher mean deft. Conclusions: Our cross-sectional study confirms that children who require dental treatment under GA have a high burden of disease. While individual risk indicators such as diet and oral hygiene play a role in the progression of early childhood caries (ECC), we also demonstrate that children who do not have access to early preventive visits or a dental home are at a higher risk. In addition to improving motivation for oral hygiene at home and nutritional education, improving access to oral health care should be addressed in strategies to reduce ECC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Dentistry Journal in 2021)
15 pages, 707 KiB  
Article
Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices of Dentists in Caribbean Countries during the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study
Dent. J. 2021, 9(11), 133; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9110133 - 15 Nov 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2249
Abstract
Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected dentists globally, both financially and mentally. This study aimed to determine the knowledge, attitude, and practices of dentists in Caribbean countries during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: A non-probability sample was obtained from dentists in more than ten [...] Read more.
Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected dentists globally, both financially and mentally. This study aimed to determine the knowledge, attitude, and practices of dentists in Caribbean countries during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: A non-probability sample was obtained from dentists in more than ten different Caribbean countries. They were invited to complete a self-reported questionnaire, which was conducted from December 2020 to March 2021. Ethics approval was sought and an exemption was received from the UWI ethics committee. Results: One hundred and fifty-two dentists responded. More than one-third (38.8%) were in the >35–45 age group, and 58.6% were females. Most (84.9%) were general dentists and 75% were stressed by the COVID-19 situation with 80.9% being affected financially. The majority, 94.7%, believed that the highest risk of transmission of COVID-19 was via aerosol-generating procedures and 87.5% were worried about contracting it clinically. The majority (69.1%) were willing to receive the vaccine, the main reason reported for vaccine hesitancy was due to the possible side effects (35.3%). Most (75%) consumed alcohol. When the locus of control was determined, 54.6% felt they were in control of protecting themselves while 52% felt that external factors controlled their lives. Conclusions: The findings suggest that most dentists in the Caribbean were knowledgeable about COVID-19 and followed current guidelines in their practice and were willing to receive the vaccine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Dentistry Journal in 2021)
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10 pages, 1246 KiB  
Article
Usefulness of an Endodontic Case Difficulty Assessment Form of Root Canal Treatments in Dental Education in Finland
Dent. J. 2021, 9(10), 118; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9100118 - 14 Oct 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2150
Abstract
According to current care guidelines, it would be beneficial to evaluate the difficulty of a root canal treatment (RCT) after the decision of an indicated RCT. For this matter, several difficulty assessment forms have been developed. In this pilot study, fifth-year dental students [...] Read more.
According to current care guidelines, it would be beneficial to evaluate the difficulty of a root canal treatment (RCT) after the decision of an indicated RCT. For this matter, several difficulty assessment forms have been developed. In this pilot study, fifth-year dental students evaluated the usefulness of the Endodontic Case Difficulty Assessment Form (ECAF) presented in the Finnish Current Care Guidelines for Endodontic Treatment (2014). Another aim was to postoperatively investigate how well the evaluation by dental students using the ECAF associated with the outcome of RCT evaluated by a specialist in endodontics. The dental students’ (n = 33) and the supervisor’s assessments of the RCTs were compared postoperatively at the Dental Educational Unit, Oulu, Finland. After completing the ECAF, the students’ experiences of its use were explored with a structured form. In ECAF, patient-derived factors, such as gagging, deviant crown morphology, and complications in previous endodontic treatment, were all significantly associated with complications in RCTs by the dental students (p < 0.05). The assessments by students and the supervisor differed in 55% of cases, especially in moderately difficult cases. In the majority of these cases (71%), the students evaluated the case to be easier than the teacher. Students found the ECAF user-friendly, even if it did not demonstrate their competence in accomplishing RCTs. The ECAF appears useful for junior dentists, specifically in terms of distinguishing the least and most difficult cases. A simpler form could be useful for students and clinicians. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Dentistry Journal in 2021)
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12 pages, 5699 KiB  
Article
Influence of Dental Implant Diameter and Bone Quality on the Biomechanics of Single-Crown Restoration. A Finite Element Analysis
Dent. J. 2021, 9(9), 103; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9090103 - 06 Sep 2021
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 3602
Abstract
Background: Success of an implant-supported prosthesis is highly dependent on implant diameter and bone quality. The objective of this study is to assess these two variables under axial or 30° angulated loading. Methods: The study was conducted using finite element model simulations of [...] Read more.
Background: Success of an implant-supported prosthesis is highly dependent on implant diameter and bone quality. The objective of this study is to assess these two variables under axial or 30° angulated loading. Methods: The study was conducted using finite element model simulations of dental implants with an unchanging length of 6.5 mm and varying diameters of Ø3.3; Ø3.5; Ø3.75; Ø4, Ø4.25 and Ø4.75 mm. The implants were placed in an axial position and a 2 mm high straight transepithelial (intermediate abutment) was used to perform a single tooth restoration. Four bone quality scenarios, Type IV, III, II or 0-I bone, were simulated from a simplified model of the mandible. A 200N load was applied both axially and at a 30° angle to the occlusal surface of the prosthesis, which was 11 mm above the implant platform, and the equivalent Von Mises stress in the bone was analyzed. Results: The maximum stress value was obtained for the Ø3.3 implant in Type IV bone (235 MPa), while the lowest value was obtained for the Ø4.75 implant and in Type 0-I bone (41 MPa). Regardless of the implant diameter, an improvement in bone quality produced a reduction in bone stress. The same effect was observed as the implant diameter was increased, being this effect even more pronounced. Conclusions: Implant diameter has an important effect on bone stress, with a reduction in stress as the implant diameter increases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Dentistry Journal in 2021)
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8 pages, 9536 KiB  
Article
Abrasion Behaviour of Different Charcoal Toothpastes When Using Electric Toothbrushes
Dent. J. 2021, 9(8), 97; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9080097 - 20 Aug 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2693
Abstract
Objectives: The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the abrasion behaviour of different charcoal toothpastes when brushing with electric toothbrushes on human enamel. Materials and Methods: A self-designed brushing machine was built using six commercially available electric toothbrushes in abrasion [...] Read more.
Objectives: The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the abrasion behaviour of different charcoal toothpastes when brushing with electric toothbrushes on human enamel. Materials and Methods: A self-designed brushing machine was built using six commercially available electric toothbrushes in abrasion chambers. Each chamber was constantly supplied with a toothpaste–water mix. Pieces of human enamel, which were embedded in PMMA, were brushed for 4 h. Before and after brushing, profilometer measurements were performed in order to determine the substance loss due to brushing. Results: The following calculated mean removal values (mean ± SD) were found: (4.6 ± 0.6) µm (Group C: Splat Blackwood), (3.2 ± 0.9) µm (Group D: Curaprox Black is White), (2.3 ± 0.7) µm (Group B: Sensodyne Pro Schmelz), (1.7 ± 0.6) µm (Group A: Water), (1.4 ± 0.6) µm (Group E: Prokudent Black Brilliant). A post hoc Tukey HSD test (p = 0.05) showed that the results for Group A/B/E, Group B/D and Group C each lie within subsets that differ statistically significantly from the other subsets. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it can be stated that some charcoal toothpastes lead to significantly higher abrasion on human enamel, when brushing with electric brushes. Clinical Relevance: As low-abrasion toothpaste is generally advisable, and some charcoal toothpastes should be viewed critically with regard to their abrasive properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Dentistry Journal in 2021)
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14 pages, 286 KiB  
Article
The New Normalcy in Dentistry after the COVID-19 Pandemic: An Italian Cross-Sectional Survey
Dent. J. 2021, 9(8), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9080086 - 31 Jul 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2920
Abstract
Background: After the first lockdown, Italian dentists resumed their practice while handling several challenges. Reducing contagion risk by complying with the stringent measures recommended by the Italian Ministry of Health for dental activity while also balancing patient needs was a difficult task. This [...] Read more.
Background: After the first lockdown, Italian dentists resumed their practice while handling several challenges. Reducing contagion risk by complying with the stringent measures recommended by the Italian Ministry of Health for dental activity while also balancing patient needs was a difficult task. This work aims to understand the procedures that were adopted in the second phase of the COVID-19 pandemic (5 May–30 September 2020) and the dentists’ expectations and concerns about returning to normalcy. Methods: A national survey with 38 questions was conducted from November 2020 to January 2021 and comparisons were performed among the five main Italian geographic areas. Results: Located mainly in northwest Italy, 1028 dentists were included in the survey. About 83% of the Italian dentists fully restarted their activities after the lockdown. The resumption was significantly marked in North Italy and the Center than in the South (p < 0.01). Over 80% adopted the recommended precautional guidelines, modifying them according to the specific dental treatment executed. Fifty percent of dentists were confident in returning to normalcy after the COVID-19 crisis. Many precautions adopted during the pandemic will be continued, especially in South Italy and the Islands (p < 0.01). Conclusions: Italian dentists reported excellent autonomous organizational skills and the maintaining of high-quality precautions during the reopening phase. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Dentistry Journal in 2021)
10 pages, 1335 KiB  
Article
Time Efficiency of Digitally and Conventionally Produced Single-Unit Restorations
Dent. J. 2021, 9(6), 62; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9060062 - 01 Jun 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2424
Abstract
The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the time efficiency of digital chairside and labside workflows with a conventional workflow for single-unit restorations. The time efficiency in this specific sense was defined as the time, which has to be spent [...] Read more.
The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the time efficiency of digital chairside and labside workflows with a conventional workflow for single-unit restorations. The time efficiency in this specific sense was defined as the time, which has to be spent in a dental office by a dental professional performing the relevant steps. A model with interchangeable teeth on position 36 was created. These teeth were differently prepared, responding to several clinical situations to perform single-unit restorations. Different manufacturing techniques were used: For the digital workflows, CEREC Omnicam (CER) and Trios 3 (TN/TI) were used. The conventional workflow, using a dual-arch tray impression technique, served as the control group. For the labside workflow (_L) and the conventional impression procedure (CO), the time necessary for the impressions and temporary restorations was recorded and served as operating time. The chairside workflow time was divided by the time for the entire workflow (_C) including scan, design, milling and finishing the milled restoration, and in the actual working time (_CW) leaving out the chairside milling of the restoration. Labside workflow time ranged from 9 min 27 s (CER_L) to 12 min 41 s (TI_L). Entire chairside time ranged from 43 min 35 s (CER_C) to 58 min 43 s (TI_C). Pure chairside working time ranged from 15 min 21 s (CER_CW) to 23 min 17 s (TI_CW). Conventional workflow time was 10 min 39 s (CO) on average. The digital labside workflow and the conventional workflow require a similar amount of time. The digital chairside workflow is more time consuming. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Dentistry Journal in 2021)
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11 pages, 1501 KiB  
Article
Survival of Single-Unit Porcelain-Fused-to-Metal (PFM) and Metal Crowns Placed by Students at an Australian University Dental Clinic over a Five-Year Period
Dent. J. 2021, 9(6), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9060060 - 28 May 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3649
Abstract
The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the survival rate of single-unit porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) and metal crowns placed by dental students at an Australian university undergraduate dental clinic over a five-year period. Complications and the incidences of crown failures were recorded. [...] Read more.
The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the survival rate of single-unit porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) and metal crowns placed by dental students at an Australian university undergraduate dental clinic over a five-year period. Complications and the incidences of crown failures were recorded. Clinical records pertaining to single-unit PFM and metal crowns inserted over a five-year period were reviewed, including patient-related, tooth-related, and procedural factors for each crown. Crowns were evaluated as surviving, surviving with complications, or failed. Kaplan–Meier statistical analysis was used to estimate survival rate., This study is based on a sample of 232 (78.4%) PFM crowns and 64 (21.6%) metal crowns inserted between 2014 and 2018. Cumulatively, 224 (75.7%) were surviving, 48 (16.2%) were surviving but previously had complications, and 24 (8.1%) failed. The 5-year cumulative survival rate of all PFM and metal crowns was 83.9% (0.839 ± 0.038, Kaplan–Meier). The average survival time for all crowns was 4.432 ± 0.089 years. Comparatively, PFM crowns had a higher survival rate at 1 year (0.972 ± 0.010) and 2 years (0.919 ± 0.017), compared to metal crowns at 1 year (0.964 ± 0.011) and 2 years (0.894± 0.018). The survival rate of metal crowns remained constant from 2 years to 4 years and thereafter, whereas there was a continued decline in the survival rate of PFM crowns to 83.2% (0.832 ± 0.038) at 4 years and thereafter. Crowns placed on premolars had the highest cumulative survival rate whereas those placed on molars exhibited the lowest survival rate for the duration of the study period. Despite single-unit PFM crowns having a higher 1- and 2-year survival rate compared to metal crowns, metal crowns had a higher survival rate at 4 years and thereafter. Survival rates are comparable to previous studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Dentistry Journal in 2021)
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Review

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20 pages, 3706 KiB  
Review
The Current and Potential Application of Medicinal Cannabis Products in Dentistry
Dent. J. 2021, 9(9), 106; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9090106 - 10 Sep 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 9286
Abstract
Oral and dental diseases are a major global burden, the most common non-communicable diseases (NCDs), and may even affect an individual’s general quality of life and health. The most prevalent dental and oral health conditions are tooth decay (otherwise referred to as dental [...] Read more.
Oral and dental diseases are a major global burden, the most common non-communicable diseases (NCDs), and may even affect an individual’s general quality of life and health. The most prevalent dental and oral health conditions are tooth decay (otherwise referred to as dental caries/cavities), oral cancers, gingivitis, periodontitis, periodontal (gum) disease, Noma, oro-dental trauma, oral manifestations of HIV, sensitive teeth, cracked teeth, broken teeth, and congenital anomalies such as cleft lip and palate. Herbs have been utilized for hundreds of years in traditional Chinese, African and Indian medicine and even in some Western countries, for the treatment of oral and dental conditions including but not limited to dental caries, gingivitis and toothaches, dental pulpitis, halitosis (bad breath), mucositis, sore throat, oral wound infections, and periodontal abscesses. Herbs have also been used as plaque removers (chew sticks), antimicrobials, analgesics, anti-inflammatory agents, and antiseptics. Cannabis sativa L. in particular has been utilized in traditional Asian medicine for tooth-pain management, prevention of dental caries and reduction in gum inflammation. The distribution of cannabinoid (CB) receptors in the mouth suggest that the endocannabinoid system may be a target for the treatment of oral and dental diseases. Most recently, interest has been geared toward the use of Cannabidiol (CBD), one of several secondary metabolites produced by C. sativa L. CBD is a known anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anxiolytic, anti-microbial and anti-cancer agent, and as a result, may have therapeutic potential against conditions such burning mouth syndrome, dental anxiety, gingivitis, and possible oral cancer. Other major secondary metabolites of C. sativa L. such as terpenes and flavonoids also share anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anxiolytic and anti-microbial properties and may also have dental and oral applications. This review will investigate the potential of secondary metabolites of C. sativa L. in the treatment of dental and oral diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Dentistry Journal in 2021)
11 pages, 306 KiB  
Review
Cariogenic Biofilms: Development, Properties, and Biomimetic Preventive Agents
Dent. J. 2021, 9(8), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9080088 - 03 Aug 2021
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 4691
Abstract
Oral biofilms will build up within minutes after cleaning of the dental hard tissues. While the application of remineralizing agents is a well-known approach to prevent dental caries, modern oral care products offer also additional active agents to maintain oral health. Human saliva [...] Read more.
Oral biofilms will build up within minutes after cleaning of the dental hard tissues. While the application of remineralizing agents is a well-known approach to prevent dental caries, modern oral care products offer also additional active agents to maintain oral health. Human saliva contains many different organic and inorganic compounds that help to buffer organic acids produced by cariogenic microorganisms. However, most oral care products only contain remineralizing agents. To improve the benefit of those products, further active ingredients are needed. Books, review articles, and original research papers were included in this narrative review. Putting all these data together, we give an overview of oral biofilms and active compounds used in modern oral care products to interact with them. The special focus is on inorganic compounds and their interaction with oral biofilms. While organic compounds have several limitations (e.g., cell toxicity), inorganic compounds based on calcium and/or phosphate (e.g., sodium bicarbonate, hydroxyapatite, calcium carbonate) offer several advantages when used in oral care products. Calcium release can inhibit demineralization, and the release of hydroxide and phosphate ions might help in the buffering of acids. Therefore, the focus of this review is to summarize the scientific background of further active ingredients that can be used for oral care formulations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Dentistry Journal in 2021)

Other

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10 pages, 5604 KiB  
Case Report
The Importance of Using Physical Tridimensional Models for the Management and Planning of Extended Osseous Odontogenic Lesions
Dent. J. 2021, 9(11), 134; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9110134 - 15 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1989
Abstract
(1) Surgical intervention becomes crucial in situations in which lack of action would cause a decrease in quality of life for the patient. As healthcare professionals, our next objective is to reduce patient fear perception. This work’s aim is to illustrate how physical [...] Read more.
(1) Surgical intervention becomes crucial in situations in which lack of action would cause a decrease in quality of life for the patient. As healthcare professionals, our next objective is to reduce patient fear perception. This work’s aim is to illustrate how physical tridimensional models can serve not only as confidence boosters for the patient, but also as a valid tool to aid both the clinician and the fostering of a patient–doctor relationship. (2) An example case managed using a stereolithographic model in the pre-surgical planning stage is presented in which surgical planning was carried out by analysis of radiographic investigations combined with a tridimensional resin model derived from the patient’s x-ray exam. (3) Successful enucleation, surgical debridement, and stable follow-up shows the effectiveness of the applied surgical protocol, confirming that planification using a physical representation of the tridimensional exam aids in the correct surgical management of said lesions. (4) The effectiveness o101f the surgical act itself as well as the follow-up showing ossification of the bony lesion and absence of relapse of a highly recurrent lesion confirms the effectiveness of the tools used for this surgical intervention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Dentistry Journal in 2021)
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9 pages, 1707 KiB  
Case Report
Clinical Pilot Series of Non-Self-Contained Periodontal Infrabony Defects Treated with a Slowly Resorbable Bovine Pericardium Membrane in Combination with Low-Temperature-Treated Decellularized Bovine Bone Particles
Dent. J. 2021, 9(10), 110; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9100110 - 26 Sep 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1899
Abstract
The aim of this case series was to present the clinical outcomes of non-contained intrabony periodontal defects (IPDs) treated by means of papillary preservation flaps in association with a slowly resorbable bovine pericardium membrane (BPM) and a low-temperature-treated bovine bone graft (BBG). Eight [...] Read more.
The aim of this case series was to present the clinical outcomes of non-contained intrabony periodontal defects (IPDs) treated by means of papillary preservation flaps in association with a slowly resorbable bovine pericardium membrane (BPM) and a low-temperature-treated bovine bone graft (BBG). Eight healthy, non-smoking patients (two males and six females, mean age 48 ± 8 years) with stage 3 periodontitis and at least one site with residual probing depth (PD) ≥ 6 mm associated with a non-contained IPD ≥ 3 mm were treated. Two weeks after surgery, no adverse events were observed, and an early wound healing score (EHS) of 8.1 ± 1.0 was recorded. After 1 year, the mean probing depth (PD) reduction and mean clinical attachment level gain (CAL-gain) accounted for 4.8 ± 0.7 and 3.5 ± 0.7 mm, respectively, whereas the mean gingival recession (REC) was of 1.2 ± 0.3 mm. Radiographic bone fill was observed in all cases. In conclusion, the treatment of non-contained IPDs with a slowly resorbable BPM and a low-temperature-treated BBG could be considered safe and may result in significant clinical improvements 1 year after surgery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Dentistry Journal in 2021)
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