Hybrid Organic–Inorganic Materials Used to Improve the Environment and Human Health (2nd Edition)

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Hybrid and Composite Crystalline Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 June 2024 | Viewed by 2627

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Functional Dyes and Related Materials, National Institute for Research and Development in Chemistry and Petrochemistry, ICECHIM, 060021 Bucharest, Romania
Interests: dyes; organic synthesis; hybrid materials; smart textile; coatings; luminescent materials; nanomaterials
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Due to the success of the first volume of the Special Issue “Hybrid Organic–Inorganic Materials Used to Improve the Environment and Human Health” (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/crystals/special_issues/hybrid_crystals), it is our pleasure to announce a second volume in this series.

In recent years, due to climate change, there has been increasing interest in the development of hybrid and nanocomposite materials. This state-of-the-art technology leads to the realization of many environmentally friendly materials or properties that help reduce pollution factors. Most applications are found in the automotive, textile, and food industries. These are reflected in the general state of human health. Another important factor that contributes to this condition is the development and application of nanomaterials in medicine. The research mainly focuses on the design and engineering of these materials, which include metal–organic frameworks; covalent organic frameworks; zeolite materials; organic–inorganic hybrids; and composites based on graphene or carbon nitride, as well as those based on metal, metal oxides, or polymers, and their applications.

The original research and review papers that will be published in this Special Issue will cover various topics, including, but not limited to, the following:

  • Preparative and processing techniques;
  • Structure and morphology;
  • Tailored optical properties;
  • Dressings and biomaterials carrying drugs;
  • Advanced catalyst systems;
  • Natural pesticides;
  • Smart packaging;
  • Bioactive coatings;
  • Electrochemical sensors.

Dr. Radu Claudiu Fierascu
Dr. Florentina Monica Raduly
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Crystals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 5370 KiB  
Article
Ternary Hybrid Materials for Highly Sensitive Acetone Sensing at Room Temperature
by Nurul Athirah Abu Hussein, Yew Hoong Wong, Zainal Arif Burhanudin and Huzein Fahmi Hawari
Crystals 2023, 13(5), 845; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst13050845 - 20 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1123
Abstract
The performance of a conventional metal oxide sensor (MOX) is highly dependent on its high operating temperature. Many researchers have tried to solve the problem by exploring hybrid materials. On the other hand, ternary hybrid materials have emerged as a promising class of [...] Read more.
The performance of a conventional metal oxide sensor (MOX) is highly dependent on its high operating temperature. Many researchers have tried to solve the problem by exploring hybrid materials. On the other hand, ternary hybrid materials have emerged as a promising class of materials with unique properties and potential applications in various fields, be it environmental or medical, such as in breath analyzers for prediabetes analysis. This article focuses on the synthesis method, characterization, and application of ternary hybrid materials for room-temperature sensors, as well as recent advances and future developments in the field. The materials consist of three different components, metal oxide (Fe3O4), polymer (polyaniline) and carbon-based materials (reduced graphene oxide), which were synthesized using in-situ methods. Five samples were prepared in different ratios. The properties of these materials were characterized using techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The XRD and Raman analyses showed the existence of all the individual constituents in the hybrid sample. SEM and TEM also showed a strong interaction between the constituent materials as a hybrid nanocomposite. The response and recovery time were studied against 1, 10 and 100 ppm acetone. The results show that the sample with 10 wt%Fe3O4-PANI-RGO (S2_10) has a reaction and recovery time < 32 s against the above ppm and has the highest sensing response at room temperature. Full article
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18 pages, 6135 KiB  
Article
Preparation of Novel Electrospun Organic–Inorganic Hybrid Nanofibers Based on Polycaprolactone, Glycine Betaine, and Calcium Carbonate (P/G/CaCO3-EPnF)
by Nicole Butto-Miranda, Gustavo Cabrera-Barjas, Andrés Ibáñez and Andrónico Neira-Carrillo
Crystals 2023, 13(4), 611; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst13040611 - 3 Apr 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1177
Abstract
Biomedicine requires materials able to respond to specific needs without affecting the organism. Organic–inorganic fibrillar polymeric matrices possess unique properties that may fulfill these needs. In the present study, different topology-controlled poly(ε-caprolactone)-based fibrillar matrices containing glycine betaine at varying concentrations (0.5, 1, and [...] Read more.
Biomedicine requires materials able to respond to specific needs without affecting the organism. Organic–inorganic fibrillar polymeric matrices possess unique properties that may fulfill these needs. In the present study, different topology-controlled poly(ε-caprolactone)-based fibrillar matrices containing glycine betaine at varying concentrations (0.5, 1, and 2% w/v) were prepared via electrospinning. The matrices were used as substrates in calcium carbonate crystallization assays with gas diffusion to obtain a single organic–inorganic hybrid material. The resulting matrices and crystalline material were characterized using spectroscopic, microscopic, and thermogravimetric analyses. The incorporation of glycine betaine into a poly(ε-caprolactone) mesh modified the diameter of the fibers, without affecting the thermal behavior of the matrices. However, the chemical and morphological characteristics of the matrices did influence in vitro inorganic mineralization. The thermogravimetric analysis of the matrices, performed after the mineralization tests, demonstrated the existence of a new organic–inorganic hybrid material with unique properties, which is discussed in the present study. Full article
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