Building Vibration and Soil Dynamics

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Structures".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 5289

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Transportation Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200070, China
Interests: railway-induced vibration; building vibration; soil dynamics; soil–structure dynamic interaction; vibration and noise control; analytical and numerical modelling
School of Transportation Engineering, East China Jiaotong University, Nanchang 330100, China
Interests: soil dynamics and earthquake engineering; soil-structure interaction; environmental vibration; pile foundation
School of Civil and Transportation Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006, China
Interests: environmental vibration; soil-structure interaction; vibration prediction and control; structural-borne noise; analytical and numerical modelling

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geoscience, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CN Delft, The Netherlands
Interests: railway track structural health monitoring; ground penetrating radar for ballast layer inspection; track geometry inspection; track structure optimization; sleeper design; ballast layer design; railway circularity; waste tyre reuse; recycled ballast reuse; smart railway maintenance
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The growing demand for sustainable transportation has led to a significant interest in developing rail transit networks for both intra-city and inter-city travel. However, train-induced vibrations transmitted through soils to nearby buildings have become widely recognized environmental concerns, causing significant negative influence on nearby buildings, sensitive equipment, and residents. Additionally, earthquakes can cause serious physical impacts on buildings, resulting in economic losses and human casualties and injuries. Consequently, this Special Issue will focus on the modelling method and propagation characteristics of train-induced and seismic vibration on soils and buildings as well as efficient mitigation methods.

We invite original research articles and reviews that encompass a wide range of topics, including but not limited to:

  1. Characteristics of vibration sources, soil dynamics, building vibrations, and noise.
  2. Physical modelling, experimental investigations, and on-site monitoring of ground and building vibrations, as well as noise induced by railway traffic or earthquakes.
  3. Analysis of soil–building dynamic interaction.
  4. Techniques and methods for vibration reduction in buildings and surrounding areas.
  5. Utilization of artificial intelligence in soil dynamics and building vibrations.
  6. Development of guidelines and standards pertaining to building vibrations and noise.

Dr. Chao He
Dr. Wenbo Tu
Dr. Chao Zou
Dr. Yunlong Guo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • soil dynamics
  • building vibration
  • soil–building dynamic interaction
  • railway-induced vibration
  • seismic wave
  • analytical and numerical modelling
  • artificial-intelligence-based prediction
  • vibration and noise control guidelines and standards
  • on-site monitoring

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 6724 KiB  
Article
Measurements and Evaluation of Road Traffic-Induced Micro-Vibration in a Workshop Equipped with Precision Instruments
by Zhijun Zhang, Xiaozhen Li, Xun Zhang, Guihong Xu and Anjie Wu
Buildings 2024, 14(4), 1142; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14041142 - 18 Apr 2024
Viewed by 158
Abstract
Road traffic transportation has flourished in the process of urbanization due to its advantages, but concurrently it generates harmful environmental vibrations. This vibration issue becomes particularly crucial in production workshops housing precision instruments. However, limited research has been undertaken on this matter. This [...] Read more.
Road traffic transportation has flourished in the process of urbanization due to its advantages, but concurrently it generates harmful environmental vibrations. This vibration issue becomes particularly crucial in production workshops housing precision instruments. However, limited research has been undertaken on this matter. This study aimed to investigate the influence of road traffic-induced vibration on micro-vibrations within a workshop housing precision instruments. A field test was conducted to assess the vibration levels originating from both machinery operation and vehicular traffic. The results indicated that ground-borne vibrations caused by road vehicles decrease with increasing propagation distance, peaking around 10 Hz. Machinery operation vibrations were primarily concentrated above 20 Hz, while vehicular traffic vibrations were more prominent below 20 Hz. Notably, the passage of heavy trucks significantly impacted both ground and workshop vibrations, with vertical vibrations being particularly significant. Within the workshop, the second floor experienced higher vibrations above 20 Hz due to the presence of installed instruments. Importantly, the micro-vibration levels on both floors exceeded the VC-C limit (12.5 µm/s), highlighting the need to account for road traffic and machinery vibrations in workshop design. These data can be utilized to validate numerical models for predicting road traffic-induced vibrations, aiding in vibration assessment during road planning and design. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Vibration and Soil Dynamics)
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17 pages, 5113 KiB  
Article
Research on the Dynamic Response of the Multi-Line Elevated Station with “Integral Station-Bridge System”
by Xiangrong Guo and Shipeng Wang
Buildings 2024, 14(3), 758; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14030758 - 11 Mar 2024
Viewed by 661
Abstract
Elevated stations serve as critical hubs in urban rail transit engineering. The structure of multi-line “building-bridge integrated” elevated stations is unique, with intricate force transfer paths and challenges to clarify dynamic coupling from train vibrations, necessitating the study of such stations’ train-induced dynamic [...] Read more.
Elevated stations serve as critical hubs in urban rail transit engineering. The structure of multi-line “building-bridge integrated” elevated stations is unique, with intricate force transfer paths and challenges to clarify dynamic coupling from train vibrations, necessitating the study of such stations’ train-induced dynamic responses. This paper presents a case study of a typical “building-bridge integrated” elevated station, utilizing the self-developed finite element software GSAP-V2024 to establish a simulation model of a coupled train–track–station system. It analyzed the station’s dynamic response under various single-track operating conditions and the pattern of the vibration response as the speed changes. Additionally, the study examined lateral vibration response changes in the station under double, quadruple, and sextuple train operations at the same speed. Findings reveal that the station’s vertical responses generally increase with speed, significantly outpacing lateral responses. Under single-track operations, dynamic responses vary across different types of track-bearing floors and frame structures with different spans. With an increase in the number of operating train lines, the station’s vertical response grows, with lateral responses being neutralized in the mid-span of the triple-span frame structure and amplified at the edges. These results provide a reference for the structural design of multi-line “building-bridge integrated” elevated stations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Vibration and Soil Dynamics)
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15 pages, 4838 KiB  
Article
Time Domain Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Vertically Loaded Tapered Pile in Layered Soils
by Qiangqiang Shua, Kexing Liu, Jingkai Li and Wenbo Tu
Buildings 2024, 14(2), 445; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14020445 - 06 Feb 2024
Viewed by 473
Abstract
A simplified model is proposed for predicting the nonlinear dynamic response of vertically loaded tapered piles in the time domain, in which the tapered pile is divided into several frustum segments and the four-spring is used for the simulation of the soil–pile interaction. [...] Read more.
A simplified model is proposed for predicting the nonlinear dynamic response of vertically loaded tapered piles in the time domain, in which the tapered pile is divided into several frustum segments and the four-spring is used for the simulation of the soil–pile interaction. The differential equations for the tapered pile are given and solved by the finite difference method. The vertical dynamic response of a typical tapered pile is investigated, and the consistency of the computational results compared with the finite element results convincingly verifies the reliability of the proposed simplified model. Then, recommended segment numbers, considering the computational efficiency and accuracy requirements for the dynamic analysis of tapered piles, are given. And parametric studies are also carried out to investigate the effect of soil and pile parameters on the nonlinear dynamic response of the tapered pile. The results show that soil nonlinearity significantly affects the vertical dynamic characteristics of the tapered pile. And the tapered pile shows better dynamic characteristics than the cylindrical pile with the same volume and pile length. In addition, the properties of the soil along the upper part of the tapered pile have a more considerable effect on the dynamic response of the tapered pile. These results help to further improve the theory of nonlinear dynamic response analysis of tapered piles and promote its widespread application in engineering practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Vibration and Soil Dynamics)
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14 pages, 3674 KiB  
Article
Building Vibration Measurement and Prediction during Train Operations
by Lingshan He and Ziyu Tao
Buildings 2024, 14(1), 142; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14010142 - 06 Jan 2024
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 706
Abstract
Urban societies face the challenge of working and living in environments filled with vibration caused by transportation systems. This paper conducted field measurements to obtain the characteristics of vibration transmission from soil to building foundations and within building floors. Subsequently, a prediction method [...] Read more.
Urban societies face the challenge of working and living in environments filled with vibration caused by transportation systems. This paper conducted field measurements to obtain the characteristics of vibration transmission from soil to building foundations and within building floors. Subsequently, a prediction method was developed to anticipate building vibrations by considering the soil and structure interaction. The rigid foundation model was simplified into a foundation–soil system connected via spring damping, and the building model is based on axial wave transmission within the columns and attached floors. Building vibrations were in response to measured input vibration levels at the ground and were validated through field measurements. The influence of different building heights on soil and structure vibration propagation was studied. The results showed that the predicted vibrations match well with the measured vibrations. The proposed prediction model can reasonably predict the building vibration caused by train operations. The closed-form method is an efficient tool for predicting floor vibrations prior to construction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Vibration and Soil Dynamics)
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17 pages, 7022 KiB  
Article
Effect of Soil Anisotropy on Ground Motion Characteristics
by Yuhong Xie, Zhou Cao and Jian Yu
Buildings 2023, 13(12), 3017; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13123017 - 03 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 732
Abstract
Soil transverse isotropy results in different stiffness characteristics in horizontal and vertical directions. However, the effect is usually neglected in seismic motion analysis. In this study, an equivalent linear anisotropic soil model was established based on the finite element method, and we investigated [...] Read more.
Soil transverse isotropy results in different stiffness characteristics in horizontal and vertical directions. However, the effect is usually neglected in seismic motion analysis. In this study, an equivalent linear anisotropic soil model was established based on the finite element method, and we investigated the impact of anisotropic parameters on ground motion at the site under various seismic wave inputs. It was found that the anisotropic parameters have a more significant effect on seismic waves, with the dominant frequency being closer to the fundamental frequency of the site. As an example, the soil dynamic parameters in Shanghai Yangshan Port were calibrated by a series of bending elements, resonance columns, and cyclic triaxial tests. The influences of anisotropy on the peak ground acceleration (PGA) and response spectrum were studied for Yangshan Port. Additionally, the standard design response spectra considering the soil anisotropy were provided. A comparison reveals that the existing isotropic design response spectrum may lead to dangerous seismic design for the structures at Yangshan port. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Vibration and Soil Dynamics)
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30 pages, 15990 KiB  
Article
Dynamic Response of Transmission Tower-Line Systems Due to Ground Vibration Caused by High-Speed Trains
by Guifeng Zhao, Meng Wang, Ying Liu and Meng Zhang
Buildings 2023, 13(11), 2884; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13112884 - 18 Nov 2023
Viewed by 789
Abstract
With the continuous expansion of the scale of power grid and transportation infrastructure construction, the number of crossovers between transmission lines and high-speed railways continues to increase. At present, there is a lack of systematic research on the dynamic characteristics of transmission tower-line [...] Read more.
With the continuous expansion of the scale of power grid and transportation infrastructure construction, the number of crossovers between transmission lines and high-speed railways continues to increase. At present, there is a lack of systematic research on the dynamic characteristics of transmission tower-line structures crossing high-speed railways under vehicle-induced ground vibration. This article focuses on the phenomenon of accidents such as line drops when crossing areas in recent years and establishes a high-speed train track foundation soil finite element model in ABAQUS that considers track irregularity. The three-dimensional vibration characteristics and attenuation law of train ground vibration are analyzed. Acceleration data for key points are also extracted. A separate finite element model of the transmission tower-line system is established in ANSYS, where acceleration is applied as an excitation to the transmission tower-line system, and the coupling effect between the tower and the line is considered to analyze its dynamic response. Subsequently, modal analysis is conducted on the tower-line system, providing the vibration modes and natural frequencies of the transmission tower-line structure. The effects of factors such as train speed, soil quality, and distance from the tower to the track on the dynamic response of the transmission tower-line system under vehicle-induced ground vibration are studied. The results show that the speed range (300 km/h–400 km/h) and track distance range (4.5 m–30 m) with the greatest impacts are obtained. The research results can provide a reference for the reasonable design of transmission tower-line systems in high-speed railway sections. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Vibration and Soil Dynamics)
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14 pages, 6173 KiB  
Article
Experimental Study on Bearing Behavior and Soil Squeezing of Jacked Pile in Stiff Clay
by Banglu Xi, Guangzi Li and Xiaochuan Chen
Buildings 2023, 13(10), 2609; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13102609 - 16 Oct 2023
Viewed by 621
Abstract
In order to study the bearing behavior and soil-squeezing of jacked piles in stiff clay, two groups of pile penetration tests were performed, with a rough pile that can reproduce the quick-shear behavior of the pile–soil interface, i.e., group 1 in stiffer clay, [...] Read more.
In order to study the bearing behavior and soil-squeezing of jacked piles in stiff clay, two groups of pile penetration tests were performed, with a rough pile that can reproduce the quick-shear behavior of the pile–soil interface, i.e., group 1 in stiffer clay, and group 2 in softer clay for comparison. For each group, the adjacent pile was additionally penetrated at different pile spacings to study the soil-squeezing effect on an adjacent pile. The results show that the penetration resistance increased rapidly at the beginning and then increased at a lower rate. This is because the resistance at the pile end increased rapidly at the beginning and then kept stable with fluctuations, whereas the resistance at the pile side continually increased due to the increasing contact area. Therefore, the ratio of the resistance at the pile end to the total penetration resistance exhibited a softening behavior, which first increased to a peak and then gradually decreased. In addition, there was soil-squeezing stress and soil-squeezing displacement in the ground and adjacent piles due to pile penetration. In stiffer clay, the soil-squeezing stress was larger than that in softer clay due to the higher strength, whereas the soil-squeezing displacement was smaller than that in softer clay due to the low compressibility. In addition, the nonlinear equation form y = ae−bx can be employed to describe the effect of pile spacing on the vertical flotation, horizontal deviation, and pile strain of the adjacent pile. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Vibration and Soil Dynamics)
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