Reviews in Neural Engineering, Neuroergonomics and Neurorobotics

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425). This special issue belongs to the section "Neural Engineering, Neuroergonomics and Neurorobotics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2024) | Viewed by 3115

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China
Interests: neural engnieering; neural signal processing; neuromodulation

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Guest Editor
Center for Cognition and Neuroergonomics, Beijing Normal University Zhuhai, Zhuhai, China
Interests: brain computer interfaces; neural decoding

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Center for Cognition and Neuroergonomics, Beijing Normal University Zhuhai, Zhuhai, China
Interests: neural signal processing; neural decoding

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Neural engineering aims to interface with and/or enhance the human neural system. Neuroergonomics specifically aims to improve work or learning productivity via neural engineering methods, while neurorobotics aims to interface neural systems and robots. Advancements in neural signal recording and stimulation hardware (e.g., new electrode concepts and placements, increasingly portable recording systems, magnetic, light, ultrasound, and interfering electrical field stimulation), neural signal processing methods (e.g., new denoising methods, source localization methods, Riemannian-geometry-based features), neural decoding algorithms (e.g., based on deep learning, across-participant learning AND matrix factorization), and new concepts in neural enhancement have recently resulted in much progress in these fields.

As these fields quickly grow, up-to-date summaries of research are needed to inform and focus the community on the latest challenges and opportunities. This Special Issue solicits reviews of recent work, including all methods for interfacing with or enhancing the neural system, enhancing productivity via neural engineering, and all approaches for linking robots with neural systems. Systematic reviews and focused reviews are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Xiaoli Li
Dr. Zheng Li
Dr. Tianyi Zhou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Brain Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • neuroergonomics
  • neurorobotics
  • brain computer interfaces
  • neural interfaces
  • neural engineering

Published Papers (2 papers)

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19 pages, 3456 KiB  
Review
Terahertz Radiation Modulates Neuronal Morphology and Dynamics Properties
by Shaoqing Ma, Peng Ding, Zhengxuan Zhou, Huilong Jin, Xiaoli Li and Yingwei Li
Brain Sci. 2024, 14(3), 279; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci14030279 - 14 Mar 2024
Viewed by 867
Abstract
Terahertz radiation falls within the spectrum of hydrogen bonding, molecular rotation, and vibration, as well as van der Waals forces, indicating that many biological macromolecules exhibit a strong absorption and resonance in this frequency band. Research has shown that the terahertz radiation of [...] Read more.
Terahertz radiation falls within the spectrum of hydrogen bonding, molecular rotation, and vibration, as well as van der Waals forces, indicating that many biological macromolecules exhibit a strong absorption and resonance in this frequency band. Research has shown that the terahertz radiation of specific frequencies and energies can mediate changes in cellular morphology and function by exciting nonlinear resonance effects in proteins. However, current studies have mainly focused on the cellular level and lack systematic studies on multiple levels. Moreover, the mechanism and law of interaction between terahertz radiation and neurons are still unclear. Therefore, this paper analyzes the mechanisms by which terahertz radiation modulates the nervous system, and it analyzes and discusses the methods by which terahertz radiation modulates neurons. In addition, this paper reviews the laws of terahertz radiation’s influence on neuronal morphology and kinetic properties and discusses them in detail in terms of terahertz radiation frequency, energy, and time. In the future, the safety of the terahertz radiation system should be considered first to construct the safety criterion of terahertz modulation, and the spatial resolution of the terahertz radiation system should be improved. In addition, the systematic improvement of the laws and mechanisms of terahertz modulation of the nervous system on multiple levels is the key to applying terahertz waves to neuroscience. This paper can provide a platform for researchers to understand the mechanism of the terahertz–nervous system interaction, its current status, and future research directions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reviews in Neural Engineering, Neuroergonomics and Neurorobotics)
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15 pages, 290 KiB  
Review
Non-Invasive Systems Application in Traumatic Brain Injury Rehabilitation
by Livia Livinț Popa, Diana Chira, Ștefan Strilciuc and Dafin F. Mureșanu
Brain Sci. 2023, 13(11), 1594; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci13111594 - 15 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1662
Abstract
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant public health concern, often leading to long-lasting impairments in cognitive, motor and sensory functions. The rapid development of non-invasive systems has revolutionized the field of TBI rehabilitation by offering modern and effective interventions. This narrative review [...] Read more.
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant public health concern, often leading to long-lasting impairments in cognitive, motor and sensory functions. The rapid development of non-invasive systems has revolutionized the field of TBI rehabilitation by offering modern and effective interventions. This narrative review explores the application of non-invasive technologies, including electroencephalography (EEG), quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG), brain–computer interface (BCI), eye tracking, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), magnetoencephalography (MEG), and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in assessing TBI consequences, and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), low-level laser therapy (LLLT), neurofeedback, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), transcranial alternative current stimulation (tACS) and virtual reality (VR) as therapeutic approaches for TBI rehabilitation. In pursuit of advancing TBI rehabilitation, this narrative review highlights the promising potential of non-invasive technologies. We emphasize the need for future research and clinical trials to elucidate their mechanisms of action, refine treatment protocols, and ensure their widespread adoption in TBI rehabilitation settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reviews in Neural Engineering, Neuroergonomics and Neurorobotics)
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