Crosstalk between Depression, Anxiety, Dementia, and Chronic Pain: Comorbidity in Behavioral Neurology and Neuropsychiatry Volume III

A special issue of Biomedicines (ISSN 2227-9059). This special issue belongs to the section "Neurobiology and Clinical Neuroscience".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 5912

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
HUN-REN-SZTE Neuroscience Research Group, Hungarian Research Network, University of Szeged (HUN-REN-SZTE), Szeged, Hungary
Interests: neurohormones; neuropeptides; tryptophan; kynurenine; psychiatry; neurology; depression; anxiety; dementia; pain; Alzheimer’s disease; cognition; antidepressant; translational research
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
1. Department of Psychology, University of Turin, Turin, Italy
2. Center for Studies and Research in Cognitive Neuroscience, Department of Psychology, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy
Interests: NIBS techniques; TMS; skin conductance; heart rate variability; fear conditioning; fear learning; learning; neuropsychology; prefrontal cortex; amygdala; hippocampus; anxiety; depression; working memory; PTSD; skin conductance responses; psychophysiology; error-related negativity; EEG; tDCS; Alzheimer’s disease; PIT; stress-related disorders; Parkinson’s disease; resilience; memory; neurologic patients; cognitive decisions; fMRI; translational and molecular psychiatry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This is the third volume of the Special Issue "Crosstalk between Depression, Anxiety, and Dementia: Comorbidity in Behavioral Neurology and Neuropsychiatry".

In the realm of neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases, symptoms such as depression, anxiety, dementia, and chronic pain span a spectrum and commonly coexist among patients. These illnesses pose significant research challenges due to their polygenic etiologies, multifactorial causative factors, heterogeneous pathogenesis, and diverse mental and behavioral manifestations. The range of diseases exhibiting these symptoms includes Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, Huntington's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, infectious prion disease, stroke sequelae, and psychiatric disorders such as depressive disorder, substance abuse disorder, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorder, schizophrenia, somatic symptom disorder, autism spectrum disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and hyperactive attention deficit disorder.

This Special Issue aims to shed light on the latest research pertaining to the comorbidity of depression, anxiety, dementia, and chronic pain in various diseases. We cordially invite authors to contribute original research articles focusing on, but not limited to the following:

  • Etiology, pathogenesis, and progression mechanisms;
  • Early diagnosis including the use of biomarkers, bio-imaging, and biosensors;
  • Prophylactic, disease-modifying, and therapeutic strategies, as well as novel targets;
  • Novel drug discovery and development, naturally driven biomedicines, natural bioactive molecules, and vaccines;
  • Antidepressants, anti-anxiolytics, cognitive enhancers, and analgesics;
  • Nanobiotechnology, nanosimilars, and nanobiosimilars;
  • Preclinical in vitro models and animal models;
  • Bench-to-bedside translational research;
  • Bedside-to-bench translational research.

Review articles including expert opinions, systematic analysis, metanalysis, and other statistical and analytical methods are also welcome.

Dr. Masaru Tanaka
Dr. Simone Battaglia
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomedicines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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13 pages, 285 KiB  
Article
Beyond Pain Relief: Unveiling the Multifaceted Impact of Anti-CGRP/R mAbs on Comorbid Symptoms in Resistant Migraine Patients
by Alessandra Della Vecchia, Ciro De Luca, Lucrezia Becattini, Letizia Curto, Elena Ferrari, Gabriele Siciliano, Sara Gori and Filippo Baldacci
Biomedicines 2024, 12(3), 677; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines12030677 - 18 Mar 2024
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Abstract
The study aimed to evaluate the effects of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) acting on the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) or its receptor (anti-CGRP/R mAbs) on migraine comorbidities of depression, anxiety, and fatigue in patients resistant to traditional therapies. The issue addressed in this study [...] Read more.
The study aimed to evaluate the effects of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) acting on the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) or its receptor (anti-CGRP/R mAbs) on migraine comorbidities of depression, anxiety, and fatigue in patients resistant to traditional therapies. The issue addressed in this study is pivotal to unveiling the role of this neurotransmitter beyond pain processing. We conducted an open-label prospective study assessing comorbidities in patients with high frequency (HFEM) and chronic migraine (CM), medication overuse headache (MOH), and resistance to traditional prophylaxis. All patients were treated with anti-CGRP/R mAbs for 3 months. Seventy-seven patients were enrolled with either HFEM (21%) or CM (79%) with or without MOH (56% and 44%, respectively). We identified 21 non-responders (27%) and 56 responders (73%), defined on the reduction ≥50% of headache frequency. The two groups were highly homogeneous for the investigated comorbidities. Disease severity in terms of headache frequency, migraine-related disability, and affective comorbid symptoms was reduced in both groups with different thresholds; allodynia and fatigue were ameliorated only in responders. We found that anti-CGRP/R antibodies improved pain together with affection, fatigue, and sensory sensitization in a cohort of migraine patients resistant to traditional prophylaxis. Our results offer novel perspectives on the early efficacy of anti-CGRP/R mAbs in difficult-to-treat patients focusing on clinical features other than pain relief. Full article
24 pages, 16786 KiB  
Article
Preclinical Evidence for the Role of the Yin/Yang Angiotensin System Components in Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Therapeutic Target of Astaxanthin
by Ayat I. Samra, Ahmed S. Kamel, Dalaal M. Abdallah, Mai A. Abd El Fattah, Kawkab A. Ahmed and Hanan S. El-Abhar
Biomedicines 2023, 11(12), 3156; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines11123156 - 27 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1248
Abstract
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) prevalence is emerging with an unclear etiology, hindering effective therapeutic interventions. Recent studies suggest potential renin–angiotensin system (RAS) alterations in different neurological pathologies. However, its implications in ASD are unexplored. This research fulfills the critical gap by investigating dual [...] Read more.
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) prevalence is emerging with an unclear etiology, hindering effective therapeutic interventions. Recent studies suggest potential renin–angiotensin system (RAS) alterations in different neurological pathologies. However, its implications in ASD are unexplored. This research fulfills the critical gap by investigating dual arms of RAS and their interplay with Notch signaling in ASD, using a valproic acid (VPA) model and assessing astaxanthin’s (AST) modulatory impacts. Experimentally, male pups from pregnant rats receiving either saline or VPA on gestation day 12.5 were divided into control and VPA groups, with subsequent AST treatment in a subset (postnatal days 34–58). Behavioral analyses, histopathological investigations, and electron microscopy provided insights into the neurobehavioral and structural changes induced by AST. Molecular investigations of male pups’ cortices revealed that AST outweighs the protective RAS elements with the inhibition of the detrimental arm. This established the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory axes of RAS (ACE2/Ang1-7/MasR) in the ASD context. The results showed that AST’s normalization of RAS components and Notch signaling underscore a novel therapeutic avenue in ASD, impacting neuronal integrity and behavioral outcomes. These findings affirm the integral role of RAS in ASD and highlight AST’s potential as a promising treatment intervention, inviting further neurological research implications. Full article
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Review

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22 pages, 1338 KiB  
Review
Advancements in Understanding and Classifying Chronic Orofacial Pain: Key Insights from Biopsychosocial Models and International Classifications (ICHD-3, ICD-11, ICOP)
by Federica Canfora, Giulia Ottaviani, Elena Calabria, Giuseppe Pecoraro, Stefania Leuci, Noemi Coppola, Mattia Sansone, Katia Rupel, Matteo Biasotto, Roberto Di Lenarda, Michele Davide Mignogna and Daniela Adamo
Biomedicines 2023, 11(12), 3266; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines11123266 - 9 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2256
Abstract
In exploring chronic orofacial pain (COFP), this review highlights its global impact on life quality and critiques current diagnostic systems, including the ICD-11, ICOP, and ICHD-3, for their limitations in addressing COFP’s complexity. Firstly, this study outlines the global burden of chronic pain [...] Read more.
In exploring chronic orofacial pain (COFP), this review highlights its global impact on life quality and critiques current diagnostic systems, including the ICD-11, ICOP, and ICHD-3, for their limitations in addressing COFP’s complexity. Firstly, this study outlines the global burden of chronic pain and the importance of distinguishing between different pain types for effective treatment. It then delves into the specific challenges of diagnosing COFP, emphasizing the need for a more nuanced approach that incorporates the biopsychosocial model. This review critically examines existing classification systems, highlighting their limitations in fully capturing COFP’s multifaceted nature. It advocates for the integration of these systems with the DSM-5’s Somatic Symptom Disorder code, proposing a unified, multidisciplinary diagnostic approach. This recommendation aims to improve chronic pain coding standardization and acknowledge the complex interplay of biological, psychological, and social factors in COFP. In conclusion, here, we highlight the need for a comprehensive, universally applicable classification system for COFP. Such a system would enable accurate diagnosis, streamline treatment strategies, and enhance communication among healthcare professionals. This advancement holds potential for significant contributions to research and patient care in this challenging field, offering a broader perspective for scientists across disciplines. Full article
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