Emerging Research in Neurorehabilitation

A special issue of Biomedicines (ISSN 2227-9059). This special issue belongs to the section "Neurobiology and Clinical Neuroscience".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2024) | Viewed by 5972

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Institut Equiphoria, Combo Besso-Rouges Parets, 48500 La Canourgue, France
Interests: motor control; posture and gait; movement and cognition; cerebellum and neuroplasticity; CNS plasticity; movement disorders; neurodevelopmental disorders; traumatic CNS injury; brain ischemia; neurodegenerative diseases; movement analysis; neuroimaging; clinical neurosciences; integrative neurosciences; rehabilitation devices; neurorehabilitation; hippotherapy
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Neurological disorders affect more than 1 billion people worldwide; they are the second leading cause of death and the leading cause of disability. A deeper understanding of brain functioning has opened up new perspectives for more integrative interventions, enhancing the intrinsic CNS capabilities for behavioral restitution.

This Special Issue of Biomedicines aims to gather the mechanisms of nerve injury and neuroplasticity, potential treatments for the neurorehabilitation of major neurological disorders. Authors are invited to submit cutting-edge researches and reviews addressing a broad range of studies related to this topic, for example: CNS targets eliciting neuroplasticity, endogenous and exogenous pharmacotherapy, adaptive versus maladaptive plasticity.

Dr. Manuel Gaviria
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • mechanisms
  • CNS trauma
  • ischemic CNS injury
  • neurodegenerative disorders
  • neurorehabilitation
  • neuroplasticity
  • personalized therapy
  • neuroprosthetics
  • brain–computer interfaces
  • neurodevelopmental disorder

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 3880 KiB  
Article
Synergy of Muscle and Cortical Activation through Vojta Reflex Locomotion Therapy in Young Healthy Adults: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial
by Juan Luis Sánchez-González, Emiliano Díez-Villoria, Fátima Pérez-Robledo, Ismael Sanz-Esteban, Inés Llamas-Ramos, Rocío Llamas-Ramos, Antonio de la Fuente, Beatriz María Bermejo-Gil, Ricardo Canal-Bedia and Ana María Martín-Nogueras
Biomedicines 2023, 11(12), 3203; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines11123203 - 1 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1447
Abstract
Background: Vojta Therapy is a neurorehabilitation therapy that allows to activate reflex movement patterns. The scientific literature has shown its ability to generate muscle contractions. The activation of brain neural networks has also been proven. However, the relationship between these processes has not [...] Read more.
Background: Vojta Therapy is a neurorehabilitation therapy that allows to activate reflex movement patterns. The scientific literature has shown its ability to generate muscle contractions. The activation of brain neural networks has also been proven. However, the relationship between these processes has not yet been demonstrated. For this reason, the aim of this study is to verify brain activation produced by recording with near-infrared spectroscopy and its relationship with muscle activation produced in the abdominal muscles recorded with surface electromyography. Methods: A total sample of 27 healthy subjects over 18 years of age was recruited. An experimental study on a cohort was conducted. Two experimental conditions were considered: stimuli according to the Vojta protocol, and a control non-stimuli condition. Abdominal muscle activation was measured using surface electromyography, and the activation of the motor cortex was assessed with near-infrared spectroscopy. Results: In relation to the oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (HbO), an interaction between the stimulation phase and group was observed. Specifically, the Vojta stimulation group exhibited an increase in concentration from the baseline phase to the first resting period in the right hemisphere, contralateral to the stimulation area. This rise coincided with an enhanced wavelet coherence between the HbO concentration and the electromyography (EMG) signal within a gamma frequency band (very low frequency) during the first resting period. Conclusions: The results underscore the neurophysiological effects on the brain following tactile stimulation via Vojta Therapy, highlighting increased activity in pivotal areas essential for sensory processing, motor planning, and control. This activation, particularly evident in the Vojta stimulation group, aligns with previous findings, suggesting that tactile stimuli can not only evoke the intention to move but can also initiate actual muscle contractions, emphasizing the therapy’s potential in enhancing innate locomotion and rolling movements in patients with neurological disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Research in Neurorehabilitation)
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21 pages, 4579 KiB  
Article
Efficiency of Direct Transcutaneous Electroneurostimulation of the Median Nerve in the Regression of Residual Neurological Symptoms after Carpal Tunnel Decompression Surgery
by Mustafa Al-Zamil, Inessa A. Minenko, Natalia G. Kulikova, Numman Mansur, Margarita B. Nuvakhova, Olga V. Khripunova, Irina P. Shurygina, Svetlana V. Topolyanskaya, Vera V. Trefilova, Marina M. Petrova, Ekaterina A. Narodova, Irina A. Soloveva, Regina F. Nasyrova and Natalia A. Shnayder
Biomedicines 2023, 11(9), 2396; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines11092396 - 27 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1363
Abstract
Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most frequent entrapment neuropathy. CTS therapy includes wrist immobilization, kinesiotherapy, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, carpal tunnel steroid injection, acupuncture, and physical therapy. Carpal tunnel decompression surgery (CTDS) is recommended after failure of conservative therapy. In many cases, neurological [...] Read more.
Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most frequent entrapment neuropathy. CTS therapy includes wrist immobilization, kinesiotherapy, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, carpal tunnel steroid injection, acupuncture, and physical therapy. Carpal tunnel decompression surgery (CTDS) is recommended after failure of conservative therapy. In many cases, neurological disorders continue despite CTDS. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of direct transcutaneous electroneurostimulation (TENS) of the median nerve in the regression of residual neurological symptoms after CTDS. Material and Methods: 60 patients aged 28–62 years with persisting sensory and motor disorders after CTDS were studied; 15 patients received sham stimulation with a duration 30 min.; 15 patients received high-frequency low-amplitude TENS (HF TENS) with a duration 30 min; 15 patients received low-frequency high-amplitude TENS (LF TENS) with a duration 30 min; and 15 patients received a co-administration of HF TENS (with a duration of15 min) and LF TENS (with a duration of 15 min). Results: Our research showed that TENS significantly decreased the pain syndrome, sensory disorders, and motor deficits in the patients after CTDS. Predominantly, negative and positive sensory symptoms and the pain syndrome improved after the HF TENS course. Motor deficits, reduction of fine motor skill performance, electromyography changes, and affective responses to chronic pain syndrome regressed significantly after the LF TENS course. Co-administration of HF TENS and LF TENS was significantly more effective than use of sham stimulation, HF TENS, or LF TENS in patients with residual neurological symptoms after CTDS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Research in Neurorehabilitation)
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11 pages, 1513 KiB  
Article
Do Patients with Parkinson’s Disease Benefit from Dynamic Body Weight Support? A Pilot Study on the Emerging Role of Rysen
by Laura Ciatto, Massimo Pullia, Graziana Tavilla, Biagio Dauccio, Daniela Messina, Maria Cristina De Cola, Angelo Quartarone, Roberta Cellini, Mirjam Bonanno and Rocco Salvatore Calabrò
Biomedicines 2023, 11(8), 2148; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines11082148 - 30 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1590
Abstract
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor and non-motor alterations. Typical motor symptoms include resting tremors, bradykinesia (hypokinesia or akinesia), muscular stiffness, gait alterations, and postural instability. In this context, neurorehabilitation may have a pivotal role in slowing the progression [...] Read more.
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor and non-motor alterations. Typical motor symptoms include resting tremors, bradykinesia (hypokinesia or akinesia), muscular stiffness, gait alterations, and postural instability. In this context, neurorehabilitation may have a pivotal role in slowing the progression of PD, using both conventional and innovative rehabilitation approaches. Thirty patients (15 males and 15 females) affected by PD were enrolled in our study. We randomly divided the patients into two groups, an experimental group (EG) and a control group (CG). In particular, the EG performed gait and balance training using the Rysen system, which is an innovative body weight support (BWS) system, whilst the CG received conventional physiotherapy. Both groups underwent 20 sessions, five times weekly, with each session lasting about 40 min. At the end of the training sessions (T1), we found that both groups (EG and CG) achieved clinical improvements, although the EG showed better scores for post-treatment regarding global motor functioning and postural stability compared to the CG. In conclusion, our results suggest that the Rysen system, which is an innovative BWS tool, could be considered a valid device for improving postural control and global motor functions, when compared to conventional gait training, in patients affected by PD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Research in Neurorehabilitation)
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Review

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15 pages, 662 KiB  
Review
The Role of Innovation Technology in the Rehabilitation of Patients Affected by Huntington’s Disease: A Scoping Review
by Maria Grazia Maggio, Luana Billeri, Davide Cardile, Angelo Quartarone and Rocco Salvatore Calabrò
Biomedicines 2024, 12(1), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines12010039 - 22 Dec 2023
Viewed by 929
Abstract
Huntington’s disease is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by the repetition of cytosine, adenine, and guanine trinucleotides on the short arm of chromosome 4p16.3 within the Huntingtin gene. In this study, we aim to examine and map the existing evidence on the [...] Read more.
Huntington’s disease is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by the repetition of cytosine, adenine, and guanine trinucleotides on the short arm of chromosome 4p16.3 within the Huntingtin gene. In this study, we aim to examine and map the existing evidence on the use of innovations in the rehabilitation of Huntington’s disease. A scoping review was conducted on innovative rehabilitative treatments performed on patients with Huntington’s disease. A search was performed on PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases to screen references of included studies and review articles for additional citations. Of an initial 1117 articles, only 20 met the search criteria. These findings showed that available evidence is still limited and that studies generally had small sample sizes and a high risk of bias. Regarding cognitive rehabilitation, it has emerged that VR- and PC-based methods as well as NIBS techniques are feasible and may have promising effects in individuals with Huntington’s disease. On the other hand, scarce evidence was found for cognitive and motor training that might have a slight impact on overall cognitive function in individuals with Huntington’s disease. Data show that further investigation is needed to explore the effects of innovative rehabilitation tools on cognition, especially considering that cognitive and psychiatric symptoms can precede the onset of motor symptoms by many years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Research in Neurorehabilitation)
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