Neurotrauma: Mechanisms, Pathways, and Emerging Therapeutic Interventions

A special issue of Biomedicines (ISSN 2227-9059). This special issue belongs to the section "Neurobiology and Clinical Neuroscience".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 3035

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Radiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Interests: neurotrauma; radiology; neuroscience; neurointervention

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Neurotrauma encompasses traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries. Its pathophysiological mechanisms, particularly primary injuries followed by secondary cascades like inflammation, oxidative stress, and excitotoxicity, merit further elucidation and serve as treatment targets. This Special Issue of Biomedicines focuses on the molecular and cellular pathways associated with neurotrauma. We aim to address advancements in diagnostic biomarkers, the utility of advanced imaging techniques, and the current and emerging treatments for neuroprotection and regeneration. We invite submissions of original research, reviews, and comprehensive studies that provide insights into these important areas.

The scope of this Special Issue includes but is not limited to:

  • Primary and secondary injury mechanisms in neurotrauma;
  • Molecular and cellular pathways in neurotrauma;
  • Role of inflammation post-neurotrauma;
  • Identification of new diagnostic biomarkers;
  • Utility of advanced imaging techniques in neurotrauma;
  • Therapeutic strategies focusing on neuroprotection and regeneration;
  • Reviews on current and emerging trends in neurotrauma research.

Dr. Kevin Pierre
Dr. Brandon Lucke-Wold
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • neurotrauma
  • traumatic brain injury
  • spinal cord injury
  • inflammation
  • oxidative stress
  • excitotoxicity
  • diagnostic biomarkers
  • imaging techniques
  • neuroprotection
  • neuroregeneration

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

34 pages, 7340 KiB  
Review
Neurotrauma—From Injury to Repair: Clinical Perspectives, Cellular Mechanisms and Promoting Regeneration of the Injured Brain and Spinal Cord
by Andrew R. Stevens, Antonio Belli and Zubair Ahmed
Biomedicines 2024, 12(3), 643; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines12030643 - 13 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1186
Abstract
Traumatic injury to the brain and spinal cord (neurotrauma) is a common event across populations and often causes profound and irreversible disability. Pathophysiological responses to trauma exacerbate the damage of an index injury, propagating the loss of function that the central nervous system [...] Read more.
Traumatic injury to the brain and spinal cord (neurotrauma) is a common event across populations and often causes profound and irreversible disability. Pathophysiological responses to trauma exacerbate the damage of an index injury, propagating the loss of function that the central nervous system (CNS) cannot repair after the initial event is resolved. The way in which function is lost after injury is the consequence of a complex array of mechanisms that continue in the chronic phase post-injury to prevent effective neural repair. This review summarises the events after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and spinal cord injury (SCI), comprising a description of current clinical management strategies, a summary of known cellular and molecular mechanisms of secondary damage and their role in the prevention of repair. A discussion of current and emerging approaches to promote neuroregeneration after CNS injury is presented. The barriers to promoting repair after neurotrauma are across pathways and cell types and occur on a molecular and system level. This presents a challenge to traditional molecular pharmacological approaches to targeting single molecular pathways. It is suggested that novel approaches targeting multiple mechanisms or using combinatorial therapies may yield the sought-after recovery for future patients. Full article
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21 pages, 1844 KiB  
Review
Navigating the Complexities of Traumatic Encephalopathy Syndrome (TES): Current State and Future Challenges
by Arman Fesharaki-Zadeh
Biomedicines 2023, 11(12), 3158; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines11123158 - 27 Nov 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1415
Abstract
Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a unique neurodegenerative disease that is associated with repetitive head impacts (RHI) in both civilian and military settings. In 2014, the research criteria for the clinical manifestation of CTE, traumatic encephalopathy syndrome (TES), were proposed to improve the [...] Read more.
Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a unique neurodegenerative disease that is associated with repetitive head impacts (RHI) in both civilian and military settings. In 2014, the research criteria for the clinical manifestation of CTE, traumatic encephalopathy syndrome (TES), were proposed to improve the clinical identification and understanding of the complex neuropathological phenomena underlying CTE. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the current understanding of the neuropathological and clinical features of CTE, proposed biomarkers of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in both research and clinical settings, and a range of treatments based on previous preclinical and clinical research studies. Due to the heterogeneity of TBI, there is no universally agreed-upon serum, CSF, or neuroimaging marker for its diagnosis. However, as our understanding of this complex disease continues to evolve, it is likely that there will be more robust, early diagnostic methods and effective clinical treatments. This is especially important given the increasing evidence of a correlation between TBI and neurodegenerative conditions, such as Alzheimer’s disease and CTE. As public awareness of these conditions grows, it is imperative to prioritize both basic and clinical research, as well as the implementation of necessary safe and preventative measures. Full article
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