Interplays between Metabolic Disorders and Neurological Diseases

A special issue of Biomedicines (ISSN 2227-9059). This special issue belongs to the section "Neurobiology and Clinical Neuroscience".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 1842

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, 70101, Tainan, Taiwan
Interests: neuroscience; behavioral neuroscience; depression; diabetes; obesity; glial physiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the growing recognition that metabolic disorders and neurological diseases are both prevalent and serious illnesses with significant impacts on both personal and public health, it is important to examine these two conditions and their possible connection. Research has shown that these two diseases often occur together, suggesting they may share similar underlying causes. Therefore, a better understanding of the interplay between metabolic disorders and neurological diseases will aid the development of more effective treatments.

We would like to extend an invitation to all experts in this complex and relevant field to contribute to this Special Issue. This special issue aims to showcase the latest research into the common pathways of and potential treatments for these two conditions. We welcome submissions of reviews, original research, and studies using animal or cell culture models that offer new insight into the molecular mechanisms of these two diseases.

Dr. Sheng-Feng Tsai
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • neuroinflammation
  • neurodegenerative diseases
  • mood disorders
  • diabetes
  • obesity
  • metabolism

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

16 pages, 2394 KiB  
Article
Combining Celiac and Hepatic Vagus Nerve Neuromodulation Reverses Glucose Intolerance and Improves Glycemic Control in Pre- and Overt-Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
by Jonathan J. Waataja, Anders J. Asp and Charles J. Billington
Biomedicines 2023, 11(9), 2452; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines11092452 - 4 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1491
Abstract
Neurological disorders and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are deeply intertwined. For example, autonomic neuropathy contributes to the development of T2DM and continued unmanaged T2DM causes further progression of nerve damage. Increasing glycemic control has been shown to prevent the onset and progression [...] Read more.
Neurological disorders and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are deeply intertwined. For example, autonomic neuropathy contributes to the development of T2DM and continued unmanaged T2DM causes further progression of nerve damage. Increasing glycemic control has been shown to prevent the onset and progression of diabetic autonomic neuropathies. Neuromodulation consisting of combined stimulation of celiac vagal fibers innervating the pancreas with concurrent electrical blockade of neuronal hepatic vagal fibers innervating the liver has been shown to increase glycemic control in animal models of T2DM. The present study demonstrated that the neuromodulation reversed glucose intolerance in alloxan-treated swine in both pre- and overt stages of T2DM. This was demonstrated by improved performance on oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs), as assessed by area under the curve (AUC). In prediabetic swine (fasting plasma glucose (FPG) range: 101–119 mg/dL) the median AUC decreased from 31.9 AUs (IQR = 28.6, 35.5) to 15.9 AUs (IQR = 15.1, 18.3) p = 0.004. In diabetic swine (FPG range: 133–207 mg/dL) the median AUC decreased from 54.2 AUs (IQR = 41.5, 56.6) to 16.0 AUs (IQR = 15.4, 21.5) p = 0.003. This neuromodulation technique may offer a new treatment for T2DM and reverse glycemic dysregulation at multiple states of T2DM involved in diabetic neuropathy including at its development and during progression. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interplays between Metabolic Disorders and Neurological Diseases)
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