Advanced in Schizophrenia Research and Treatment

A special issue of Biomedicines (ISSN 2227-9059). This special issue belongs to the section "Neurobiology and Clinical Neuroscience".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 1471

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Neuroscience of Castilla and León (INCYL) Laboratory, Universidad de Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain
Interests: neurology and psychiatry; psycho- and neuropharmacology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder are disabling mental diseases that may remanifest as a recurrent psychosis. Therefore, their treatment with antipsychotic drugs is essential. Adverse effects (for example, movement disturbances, and metabolic and cardiac adverse effects) reduce patients’ adherence to medical treatment. In recent years, new antipsychotic drugs that interact with new specific receptors have been found and applied to the treatment of this disease. Have these new antipsychotic drugs made progress in the treatment of schizophrenic symptoms? Have they caused fewer adverse effects? Have they had a secure therapeutic effect? Has patients’ adherence become more reliable, and have their schizophrenic symptoms therefore been treated better? Have therapeutic measures outside of pharmacological treatment made progress in the medical treatment of these symptoms? Your research papers and comprehensive reviews regarding these questions are warmly welcomed.

Dr. Felix-Martin Werner
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomedicines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antipsychotic drug
  • olanzapine
  • risperidone
  • schizophrenia
  • schizoaffective disorder

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

13 pages, 252 KiB  
Article
Understanding the Patient Landscape: A Ten-Year Retrospective Examination of Electroconvulsive Therapy in Romania’s Largest Psychiatric Hospital
by Floris Petru Iliuta, Mirela Manea, Aliss Madalina Mares, Corina Ioana Varlam, Radu Mihail Lacau, Andreea Stefanescu, Constantin Alexandru Ciobanu, Adela Magdalena Ciobanu and Mihnea Costin Manea
Biomedicines 2024, 12(5), 1028; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines12051028 - 7 May 2024
Viewed by 391
Abstract
The aim of this analysis was to investigate the socio-demographic and clinical profile, the effectiveness, and the association of pharmacological treatment in patients who underwent electroconvulsive therapy during the last 10 years in the largest psychiatric hospital in Romania. This study includes 249 [...] Read more.
The aim of this analysis was to investigate the socio-demographic and clinical profile, the effectiveness, and the association of pharmacological treatment in patients who underwent electroconvulsive therapy during the last 10 years in the largest psychiatric hospital in Romania. This study includes 249 patients aged between 18 and 73 years old. Recurrent depression was the most frequent diagnosis for which ECT was performed (T = 96, 38.55%), followed by schizophrenia (T = 72, 28.91%). The most frequent indication for ECT was treatment resistance (T = 154, 61.84%), followed by persistent suicidal ideation (T = 54, 21.68%) and catatonia (T = 42, 16.86%). In 111 (44.60%) cases included in this study, re-hospitalization was required after performing ECT, while 138 (55.40%) participants did not require any further hospital readmissions. Significant differences were found between these groups in terms of socio-demographic data, diagnosis, number of ECT sessions performed, and association of psychotropic medication during and after the procedure, therefore two separate patient profiles were found based on these characteristics. Patients necessitating re-hospitalization post-ECT were mainly males aged 25–44 diagnosed with schizophrenia and underwent a greater number of ECT sessions (7–12), whereas those not requiring re-hospitalization were predominantly females aged 45–64 with recurrent depressive disorder for which 4–6 ECT sessions were performed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced in Schizophrenia Research and Treatment)
17 pages, 468 KiB  
Article
Clinical and Sociodemographic Correlations with Neurological Soft Signs in Hospitalized Patients with Schizophrenia: A Preliminary Longitudinal Study
by Cristian Petrescu, Oana A. Mihalache, Crisanda Vilciu, Diana M. Petrescu, Gabriela Marian, Constantin A. Ciobanu and Adela M. Ciobanu
Biomedicines 2024, 12(4), 787; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines12040787 - 3 Apr 2024
Viewed by 602
Abstract
Schizophrenia is a severe, chronic neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by symptoms that profoundly impact behavior, cognition, perception, and emotions, leading to a reduced quality of life and physical impairment. Given the complexity of schizophrenia, there is a pressing need for clinical markers and tools [...] Read more.
Schizophrenia is a severe, chronic neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by symptoms that profoundly impact behavior, cognition, perception, and emotions, leading to a reduced quality of life and physical impairment. Given the complexity of schizophrenia, there is a pressing need for clinical markers and tools to predict its course, enhance disease staging, facilitate early intervention, improve differential diagnosis, and tailor individualized treatment approaches. Previous studies focused on the relationship between neurological soft signs (NSS) and factors such as age, illness duration, and symptomatology, indicating NSS as state markers improving in parallel with psychotic symptom remission or predicting treatment resistance. However, there is a lack of consensus on NSS assessment tools, hindering routine clinical monitoring despite diagnostic and prognostic potential. The present longitudinal study involved 81 psychiatric inpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Patients were assessed at three time points: baseline, 1 month, and 6 months. The examination included the use of scales to evaluate psychotic and neurological symptoms, as well as the identification of adverse extrapyramidal reactions caused by neuroleptic treatment. The progression of NSS was correlated to both the symptomatology and the sociodemographic data of the patients. The main findings from the present investigation revealed a statistical correlation between NSS and psychopathological symptoms, especially with negative symptoms of schizophrenia. However, it is important to note that neuroleptic side effects only had a limited impact on NSS. Therefore, instead of being linked to extrapyramidal symptoms caused by neuroleptics, NSS appears to be more frequently related with symptoms of schizophrenia. Our findings provide further support for their strong association with the course of schizophrenia, independent of treatment side effects, thus emphasizing their potential as reliable assessment tools in both research and clinical settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced in Schizophrenia Research and Treatment)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop