New Challenges in the Study of Diabetes and Related Complications-Pathophysiology, Prevention and Treatment

A special issue of Biomedicines (ISSN 2227-9059). This special issue belongs to the section "Cell Biology and Pathology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 1188

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Medicine, University of Latvia, Jelgavas Street 3, LV 1004 Riga, Latvia
Interests: diabetes mellitus; lipid metabolism; diabetes mellitus type 1; diabetes mellitus type 2; diabetes complications; diabetic kidney disease; metabolic dysfunction-associated fatty liver disease; non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; nutrition; glucose variability

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Diabetes mellitus remains one of the most prevalent non-communicable diseases in the developed world. Despite the ability to control for the main risk factors of diabetes complications, such as hypertension, hyperglycemia, and hyperlipidemia, a lot of patients progress to severe forms of diabetic kidney disease, diabetic retinopathy, and cardiovascular disease. Therefore, novel approaches are needed to improve the outcomes of patients undergoing already available pharmacotherapy. New therapeutic options should be targeted to achieve better glycemic control and decrease systemic low-grade inflammation and oxidative stress. Drugs targeting impaired microvasculature and macrovasculature are also needed. These may include, but are not limited to, antibodies against molecules inducing vascular damage, compounds targeting anti-oxidative defense, and others. 

This Special Issue, New Challenges in the Study of Diabetes and Related Complications: Pathophysiology and Treatment, welcomes submissions on the topic of diabetes and its complications, including the pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of these diseases.

Dr. Jeļizaveta Sokolovska
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • diabetes mellitus
  • glucose variability
  • complications of diabetes
  • low-grade inflammation
  • oxidative stress
  • anti-oxidative response

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

15 pages, 981 KiB  
Article
Effects of Once-Weekly Semaglutide on Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Metabolic Dysfunction-Associated Steatotic Liver Disease in Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Retrospective Longitudinal Study Based on Real-World Data
by Hisayuki Katsuyama, Mariko Hakoshima, Emika Kaji, Masaaki Mino, Eiji Kakazu, Sakura Iida, Hiroki Adachi, Tatsuya Kanto and Hidekatsu Yanai
Biomedicines 2024, 12(5), 1001; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines12051001 - 2 May 2024
Viewed by 755
Abstract
Once-weekly semaglutide is a widely used glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist (GLP-1RA) used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). In clinical trials, semaglutide improved glycemic control and obesity, and reduced major cardiovascular events. However, the reports are limited on its real-world efficacy [...] Read more.
Once-weekly semaglutide is a widely used glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist (GLP-1RA) used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). In clinical trials, semaglutide improved glycemic control and obesity, and reduced major cardiovascular events. However, the reports are limited on its real-world efficacy relating to various metabolic factors such as dyslipidemia or metabolic dysfunction-associated steatotic liver disease (MASLD) in Asian patients with T2D. In our retrospective longitudinal study, we selected patients with T2D who were given once-weekly semaglutide and compared metabolic parameters before and after the start of semaglutide. Seventy-five patients were eligible. HbA1c decreased significantly, by 0.7–0.9%, and body weight by 1.4–1.7 kg during the semaglutide treatment. Non-HDL cholesterol decreased significantly at 3, 6 and 12 months after the initiation of semaglutide; LDL cholesterol decreased at 3 and 6 months; and HDL cholesterol increased at 12 months. The effects on body weight, HbA1c and lipid profile were pronounced in patients who were given semaglutide as a first GLP-1RA (GLP-1R naïve), whereas improvements in HbA1c were also observed in patients who were given semaglutide after being switched from other GLP-1RAs. During a 12-month semaglutide treatment, the hepatic steatosis index (HSI) tended to decrease. Moreover, a significant decrease in the AST-to-platelet ratio index (APRI) was observed in GLP-1RA naïve patients. Our real-world study confirmed the beneficial effects of once-weekly semaglutide, namely, improved body weight, glycemic control and atherogenic lipid profile. The beneficial effects on MASLD were also suggested. Full article
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