Sports Biomechanics

A special issue of Biomechanics (ISSN 2673-7078). This special issue belongs to the section "Sports Biomechanics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2022) | Viewed by 8823

Special Issue Editors

Sports Engineering and Movement Science, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Universitätsplatz 2, 39106 Magdeburg, Germany
Interests: biomechanical research in sports; motion capturing; use of sensors in competitive sports; application of VR in sports training; sports engineering; motor learning; performance analysis; gait analysis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Centre for Sport Science and University Sports, University of Vienna, Auf der Schmelz 6A, 1150 Wien, Austria
Interests: biomechanical research in sports; biomechanical modeling; human motion analysis; performance analysis; computer science in sport
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sports biomechanics is an integral part of sports science. It is an interdisciplinary subject that deals with the causes and manifestations of movements in sports, taking into account the biological conditions, in particular the anatomical and physiological conditions, of the human musculoskeletal system. The findings of sports biomechanics are often used to improve athletic performance in competitive sports under individual anthropometric conditions. However, biomechanical investigations and modeling help to develop and optimize sports equipment and sports gear by better understanding the interactions of humans with equipment and other objects. This results in the following tasks of sports biomechanics: Quantitative description of movement from a mechanical point of view, development and application of suitable examination methods, and contribution to movement optimization and performance diagnostics. On this basis, the following topics were chosen for the planned Special Issue: biomechanical characteristics of movement sequences in high-performance sport, application of modern technologies for the diagnostics of movement techniques, biomechanical diagnostics in rehabilitation, and stress on the musculoskeletal system during athletic movements.

In line with the objectives of the journal, the planned issue will focus on the health aspects of biomechanics in sport. The areas of sport to be included are popular sport, rehabilitation, and competitive sport.

This is the joint Special Issue both in IJERPH and Biomechanics.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Witte
Prof. Dr. Arnold Baca
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomechanics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Kinematics of human movements
  • Dynamics of human movements
  • Muscle activities
  • Musculoskeletal system
  • Stress–strain analysis
  • Biomechanical examination methods
  • Biomechanics of sports
  • Biomechanical modeling
  • Prevention and rehabilitation
  • Digitalization in Sport

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 1800 KiB  
Article
Effect of Additional Loads on Joint Kinetics and Joint Work Contribution in Males and Females Performing Vertical Countermovement Jumps
Biomechanics 2022, 2(3), 319-330; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomechanics2030025 - 08 Jul 2022
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Abstract
This study aimed to investigate the effect of additional loads and sex on countermovement jump (CMJ) joint kinetics during the entire take-off impulse in males and females. Twelve female and 13 male sport students performed vertical countermovement jumps without and with additional loads [...] Read more.
This study aimed to investigate the effect of additional loads and sex on countermovement jump (CMJ) joint kinetics during the entire take-off impulse in males and females. Twelve female and 13 male sport students performed vertical countermovement jumps without and with additional loads up to +80% of body mass using a straight barbell. Ground reaction forces and body kinematics were collected simultaneously. A significant increase was found for peak ankle power, whereas knee and hip peak power decreased significantly as additional load increased in both males and females. Joint work increased in each joint as additional load increased, although significance was observed only in the hip joint. Peak power of each joint (22–47%) and total hip work (61%) were significantly higher for males than females. Relative joint contributions to total joint work (“joint work contribution”) remained stable as additional loads increased, whereas meaningful differences were found in the magnitudes of joint work contribution between males and females. CMJ joint kinetics and joint work contributions were distinctly influenced by additional load and sex. Hence, these differences should be considered when prescribing loaded jumps for training or testing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Biomechanics)
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20 pages, 2575 KiB  
Article
Biomechanical Risk Factors of Injury-Related Single-Leg Movements in Male Elite Youth Soccer Players
Biomechanics 2022, 2(2), 281-300; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomechanics2020022 - 26 May 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3294
Abstract
Altered movement patterns during single-leg movements in soccer increase the risk of lower-extremity non-contact injuries. The identification of biomechanical parameters associated with lower-extremity injuries can enrich knowledge of injury risks and facilitate injury prevention. Fifty-six elite youth soccer players performed a single-leg drop [...] Read more.
Altered movement patterns during single-leg movements in soccer increase the risk of lower-extremity non-contact injuries. The identification of biomechanical parameters associated with lower-extremity injuries can enrich knowledge of injury risks and facilitate injury prevention. Fifty-six elite youth soccer players performed a single-leg drop landing task and an unanticipated side-step cutting task. Three-dimensional ankle, knee and hip kinematic and kinetic data were obtained, and non-contact lower-extremity injuries were documented throughout the season. Risk profiling was assessed using a multivariate approach utilising a decision tree model (classification and regression tree method). The decision tree model indicated peak knee frontal plane angle, peak vertical ground reaction force, ankle frontal plane moment and knee transverse plane angle at initial contact (in this hierarchical order) for the single-leg landing task as important biomechanical parameters to discriminate between injured and non-injured players. Hip sagittal plane angle at initial contact, peak ankle transverse plane angle and hip sagittal plane moment (in this hierarchical order) were indicated as risk factors for the unanticipated cutting task. Ankle, knee and hip kinematics, as well as ankle and hip kinetics, during single-leg high-risk movements can provide a good indication of injury risk in elite youth soccer players. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Biomechanics)
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10 pages, 1133 KiB  
Article
Influence of Compliance and Aging of Artificial Turf Surfaces on Lower Extremity Joint Loading
Biomechanics 2022, 2(1), 66-75; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomechanics2010007 - 04 Feb 2022
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Abstract
Background: Artificial turf (AT) has been related to increased injury rates when compared to natural grass (NG). One potential reason for the differences in injury rates is the difference in mechanical characteristics of the surfaces. Over the course of a season on artificial [...] Read more.
Background: Artificial turf (AT) has been related to increased injury rates when compared to natural grass (NG). One potential reason for the differences in injury rates is the difference in mechanical characteristics of the surfaces. Over the course of a season on artificial turf, due to heavy use and environmental factors, properties of the surface (such as compliance) may be altered. The purpose was to compare the effects of newly installed versus aged AT on injury risks at the metatarsophalangeal, ankle, and knee joint during soccer-specific movements. Methods: Eleven male soccer players performed three movements on newly installed and ‘aged’ AT. Kinematics and kinetics were collected for the different surfaces. Results: Knee adduction moments were increased during the v-cut (119 Nm vs. 164 Nm, p = 0.02), and knee external rotation joint moments were increased during the circle run (23 Nm vs. 28 Nm, p = 0.04) with the aged surface. No surface effects were seen during the jog-sprint transition. Conclusions: For movements associated with a high risk for non-contact injuries, the age of the AT resulted in greater risk factors for injury potential at the knee joint. Further research comparing injury rates associated with AT should consider mechanical features, specifically surface compliance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Biomechanics)
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