Risk Assessment for Biological Invasions

A special issue of Biology (ISSN 2079-7737). This special issue belongs to the section "Conservation Biology and Biodiversity".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 5654

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Chinese Academy of Inspection and Quarantine, Beijing 100176, China
Interests: biodiversity; biosecurity; risk analysis; data and knowledge

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biological invasion is not just an ecological phenomenon, but also an administrative challenge. In order to manage alien invasive species, we must specify which species, pathways, and habitats should be our first priority due to our limited resources; we can use the tool of risk assessment to identify and rank them. However, risk assessment for biological invasions faces many dilemmas, which impede us in controlling alien invasive species effectively. Thus, I hope that this Special Issue can attract more attention and collect diverse examples on this topic.

I am pleased to invite your submissions on risk assessment for biological invasions from a range of disciplines. They can be based on data consolidation, field observations, modeling and simulation, procedures and guidelines, and/or geospatial techniques. In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following: data requirements and quality, risk assessment methods, introduction risk, spread risk, impact analysis, and so on.

I look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Xubin Pan
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • native species
  • data
  • pathway
  • habitat
  • impact
  • quarantine pest
  • national list
  • potential geographic distribution
  • economic losses

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 1948 KiB  
Article
The First Records of Trissolcus japonicus (Ashmead) and Trissolcus mitsukurii (Ashmead) (Hymenoptera, Scelionidae), Alien Egg Parasitoids of Halyomorpha halys (Stål) (Hemiptera, Pentatomidae) in Serbia
by Aleksandra Konjević, Luciana Tavella and Francesco Tortorici
Biology 2024, 13(5), 316; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology13050316 - 1 May 2024
Viewed by 660
Abstract
Serbia has recently begun facing a serious problem with the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stål), which was first recorded in October 2015. This species belongs to the Pentomidae family and is notorious for causing extensive damage to plants. During the winter, [...] Read more.
Serbia has recently begun facing a serious problem with the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stål), which was first recorded in October 2015. This species belongs to the Pentomidae family and is notorious for causing extensive damage to plants. During the winter, it tends to gather in urban areas, such as houses and different man-made facilities, which has raised concerns among producers and citizens. The population of this species has rapidly increased, causing significant economic damage to cultivated plants. However, despite the alarming situation no natural enemies have yet been identified in Serbia. Therefore, research in 2022 was focused on collecting stink bug eggs to investigate the presence of egg parasitoids. The study identified two foreign Hymenoptera species for the European region, Trissolcus japonicus (Ashmead) and Tr. mitsukurii (Ashmead) (Scelionidae), recorded for the first time in Serbia. Additionally, the list of egg parasitoid species belonging to the Hymenoptera order includes seven local species: Anastatus bifasciatus (Geoffroy), from the Eupelmidae family; Ooencyrtus sp., from the Encyrtidae family; and Telenomus turesis (Walker), Tr. basalis (Wollaston), Tr. belenus (Walker), Tr. colemani (Crawford), and Tr. semistriatus (Nees von Esenbeck), from the Scelionidae family. In total, nine egg parasitoid species were, for the first time, reported as parasitizing H. halys and related species in Serbia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Assessment for Biological Invasions)
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16 pages, 22658 KiB  
Article
World Spread of Tropical Soda Apple (Solanum viarum) under Global Change: Historical Reconstruction, Niche Shift, and Potential Geographic Distribution
by Yuhan Qi, Xiaoqing Xian, Haoxiang Zhao, Ming Yang, Yu Zhang, Wentao Yu and Wanxue Liu
Biology 2023, 12(9), 1179; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology12091179 - 29 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1222
Abstract
Solanum viarum has become extensively invasive owing to international trade, climate change, and land–use change. As it is classified as a quarantine weed by countries such as the U.S. and Mexico, it is critical to understand the prevailing historical dispersal, ecological niche dynamics, [...] Read more.
Solanum viarum has become extensively invasive owing to international trade, climate change, and land–use change. As it is classified as a quarantine weed by countries such as the U.S. and Mexico, it is critical to understand the prevailing historical dispersal, ecological niche dynamics, and distribution patterns. We reconstructed the historical invasion countries and analyzed the ecological niche shift of S. viarum. Using MaxEnt based on the conservativeness of ecological niches, we studied variations in the potential geographical distributions (PGDs) of S. viarum in ecosystems and variations in suitability probabilities along latitudinal gradients. The invasion history in six continents involved three phases: lag (before 1980), spread (1980–2010), and equilibrium (2010–present). The ecological niche remains conserved. The area of S. viarum PGDs had increased by 259 km2; the PGDs will expand to reach a maximum in the 2050s, SSP5–8.5. The PGDs of S. viarum will migrate to higher latitudes under the same future climate scenarios. The latitudes subject to high threats range from 20° to 30° in forest and cropland ecosystems, 15.5° to 27.5° (northern hemisphere) and 33.1° to 42.8° (southern hemisphere) in grassland ecosystems, and 20° to 35° in urban ecosystems. Global change has led to an increased threat of S. viarum at high latitudes. These findings provide a theoretical basis to monitor and control S. viarum. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Assessment for Biological Invasions)
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14 pages, 1659 KiB  
Article
Aliens on the Road: Surveying Wildlife Roadkill to Assess the Risk of Biological Invasion
by Andrea Viviano, Marcello D’Amico and Emiliano Mori
Biology 2023, 12(6), 850; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology12060850 - 13 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1323
Abstract
Monitoring the presence and distribution of alien species is pivotal to assessing the risk of biological invasion. In our study, we carried out a worldwide review of roadkill data to investigate geographical patterns of biological invasions. We hypothesise that roadkill data from published [...] Read more.
Monitoring the presence and distribution of alien species is pivotal to assessing the risk of biological invasion. In our study, we carried out a worldwide review of roadkill data to investigate geographical patterns of biological invasions. We hypothesise that roadkill data from published literature can turn out to be a valuable resource for researchers and wildlife managers, especially when more focused surveys cannot be performed. We retrieved a total of 2314 works published until January 2022. Among those, only 41 (including our original data) fitted our requirements (i.e., including a total list of roadkilled terrestrial vertebrates, with a number of affected individuals for each species) and were included in our analysis. All roadkilled species from retrieved studies were classified as native or introduced (domestic, paleo-introduced, or recently released). We found that a higher number of introduced species would be recorded among roadkill in Mediterranean and Temperate areas with respect to Tropical and Desert biomes. This is definitely in line with the current knowledge on alien species distribution at the global scale, thus confirming that roadkill datasets can be used beyond the study of road impacts, such as for an assessment of different levels of biological invasions among different countries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Assessment for Biological Invasions)
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34 pages, 11940 KiB  
Article
Distribution, Effect, and Control of Exotic Plants in Republic of Korea
by Bong Soon Lim, Ji Eun Seok, Chi Hong Lim, Gyung Soon Kim, Hyun Chul Shin and Chang Seok Lee
Biology 2023, 12(6), 826; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology12060826 - 6 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1449
Abstract
This study was carried out to clarify the spatial distribution of exotic plants at national, regional, and local levels, as well as their ecological impacts, and to prepare a strategy to reduce the impacts in Republic of Korea. This study was attempted at [...] Read more.
This study was carried out to clarify the spatial distribution of exotic plants at national, regional, and local levels, as well as their ecological impacts, and to prepare a strategy to reduce the impacts in Republic of Korea. This study was attempted at the national, regional, and local levels throughout Republic of Korea. Compositae occupied the highest percentage among invading exotic plants in Republic of Korea. A review of the biological attributes of exotic plants based on the dormancy form, longevity, disseminule form, growth form, and radicoid form showed that therophytes, annual plants, plants that disperse seeds by gravity (D4), erect form (E), and nonclonal growth form (R5) occupied the highest proportion. At the national level, the spatial distribution of exotic plants tended to depend on topographic conditions such as elevation and slope degree, and to increase around urbanized areas, agricultural fields, and coastal areas. The habitat types that exotic plants established were similar in their native habitat and in Korea, where they invaded. They preferred disturbed land such as roadsides, bare ground, agricultural fields, and so on. The spatial distribution of vegetation types dominated by exotic plants was restricted in the lowland. The proportion of the exotic/native plants tended to proportionate reversely to the vegetation type richness (the number of vegetation types); that is, the ecological diversity. The proportion of the exotic plants was higher in artificial plantations, vegetation due to disturbance, and vegetation established on lower slopes compared with upper slopes. Even at the local level, the exotic plants appeared abundantly in the introduced vegetation, while they were rare in the native ones. In the vegetation infected by exotic species, not only the species composition changed significantly, but the species diversity also decreased. Restorative treatment by introducing mantle vegetation around the hiking trail inhibited the establishment of exotic plants. Further, the restoration practice recovered the similarity of the species composition compared to the reference vegetation and increased the species diversity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Assessment for Biological Invasions)
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