Health Psychology and Behaviors during COVID-19

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2025 | Viewed by 6068

Special Issue Editors

1. Department of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, UK
2. Ageing Epidemiology Research Unit, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London W6 8RP, UK
Interests: neuroepidemiology; public health; COVID-19; biostatistics; mental health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Social Policy and Intervention, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2ER, UK
Interests: health psychology; mental health; intervention; behavioral science; COVID-19
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Ageing Epidemiology Research Unit, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London W6 8RP, UK
Interests: stress; sleep; sex differences; risk factors; biomarkers; cognitive impairment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The long-lasting COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically changed our lives over the past three years. It is not only a threat to people’s physical health but also a challenge to the mental health and psychological wellbeing of both infected and non-infected individuals. The psychological and behavioral influences of this worldwide public health emergency are multifold and warrant multidisciplinary research. The lockdown and social distancing measures introduced for reducing the spread of infections could lead to short-term or long-term emotional distress and mental health issues in the general population. People’s health behaviors, such as physical activity, diet, and sleep, could also be affected by the emotional burden, risk perception, or lockdown restrictions during the pandemic. In addition, it is essential to investigate the influencing factors and psychological determinants of people’s preventive behaviors (e.g., handwashing, mask wearing, vaccination) for COVID-19 to facilitate pandemic control and communications. Emerging studies have also focused on COVID-19 patients and investigated the impact of long COVID or post-COVID-19 sequelae on their mental health and quality of life. Papers addressing these topics are invited for this Special Issue. Original research articles, systematic reviews, and narrative reviews are welcome.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.

Dr. Bang Zheng
Dr. Qing Han
Dr. Chinedu Udeh-Momoh
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Behavioral Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • lockdown
  • psychological consequences
  • risk perception
  • mental health
  • preventive behaviors
  • vaccination
  • health behaviors
  • healthy lifestyle
  • long COVID

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

10 pages, 555 KiB  
Article
Exposure to the Death of Others during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Growing Mistrust in Medical Institutions as a Result of Personal Loss
by Brian J. Gully, Hayley Treloar Padovano, Samantha E. Clark, Gabriel J. Muro and Mollie A. Monnig
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(12), 999; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13120999 - 07 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1155
Abstract
Background and aims: The prominence of death during the COVID-19 pandemic was heightened by the potential of personally knowing someone who lost their life to the virus. The terror management theory (TMT) suggests that the salient presence of death has a pronounced effect [...] Read more.
Background and aims: The prominence of death during the COVID-19 pandemic was heightened by the potential of personally knowing someone who lost their life to the virus. The terror management theory (TMT) suggests that the salient presence of death has a pronounced effect on behavior and may result in the ossification of beliefs and actions aligned with one’s worldview (i.e., the mortality salience hypothesis). In this study, we evaluated how death exposure early in the COVID-19 pandemic could enact the process of firming up held beliefs and attitudes related to health and safety. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that exposure to a personal loss during the pandemic would strengthen participants’ baseline attitudes and behaviors regarding COVID-19 safety guidelines. Method: Data were analyzed from a prospective, regional survey administered at two time points during the pandemic, June–July 2020 and May 2021, in five United States northeastern states. Baseline and follow-up surveys were administered approximately 12 months apart, with adherence to public guidance and death exposure measured at both timepoints and other safety measures at follow-up only. Findings: Our results indicated that there were significant main effects of death exposure on guideline adherence and support for COVID-related public policy. Contrary to the mortality salience hypothesis, death exposures after baseline were related to higher medical mistrust at follow-up for those high in adherence at baseline, rather than those with low adherence. Conclusion: Our results offer some conflicting evidence to the mortality salience hypothesis. Rather than entrench people in their worldviews, death in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic appeared to sway people away from their initial stances. This finding has important implications for TMT literature and for the COVID-19 pandemic response. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Psychology and Behaviors during COVID-19)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 485 KiB  
Article
Habitual Mask Wearing as Part of COVID-19 Control in Japan: An Assessment Using the Self-Report Habit Index
by Tianwen Li, Marie Fujimoto, Katsuma Hayashi, Asami Anzai and Hiroshi Nishiura
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(11), 951; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13110951 - 19 Nov 2023
Viewed by 2998
Abstract
Although the Japanese government removed mask-wearing requirements in 2023, relatively high rates of mask wearing have continued in Japan. We aimed to assess psychological reasons and the strength of habitual mask wearing in Japan. An Internet-based cross-sectional survey was conducted with non-random participant [...] Read more.
Although the Japanese government removed mask-wearing requirements in 2023, relatively high rates of mask wearing have continued in Japan. We aimed to assess psychological reasons and the strength of habitual mask wearing in Japan. An Internet-based cross-sectional survey was conducted with non-random participant recruitment. We explored the frequency of mask usage, investigating psychological reasons for wearing masks. A regression analysis examined the association between psychological reasons and the frequency of mask wearing. The habitual use of masks was assessed in the participant’s most frequently visited indoor space and public transport using the self-report habit index. The principal component analysis with varimax rotation revealed distinct habitual characteristics. Among the 2640 participants surveyed from 6 to 9 February 2023, only 4.9% reported not wearing masks at all. Conformity to social norms was the most important reason for masks. Participants exhibited a slightly higher degree of habituation towards mask wearing on public transport compared to indoor spaces. The mask-wearing rate was higher in females than in males, and no significant difference was identified by age group. Daily mask wearing in indoor spaces was characterized by two traits (automaticity and behavioral frequency). A high mask-wearing frequency has been maintained in Japan during the social reopening transition period. Mask wearing has become a part of daily habit, especially on public transport, largely driven by automatic and frequent practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Psychology and Behaviors during COVID-19)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 1222 KiB  
Article
The Impacts of Leaders’ Influence Tactics on Teleworkers’ Job Stress and Performance: The Moderating Role of Organizational Support in COVID-19
by Gukdo Byun, Jihyeon Rhie, Soojin Lee and Ye Dai
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(10), 835; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13100835 - 12 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1170
Abstract
With the outbreak of COVID-19, organizations have increased non-face-to-face work. This study aims to examine how leaders’ influence tactics affect employees’ psychological state and job performance in a non-face-to-face work (telework) setting. Moreover, based on substitutes for leadership theory, the study proposes that [...] Read more.
With the outbreak of COVID-19, organizations have increased non-face-to-face work. This study aims to examine how leaders’ influence tactics affect employees’ psychological state and job performance in a non-face-to-face work (telework) setting. Moreover, based on substitutes for leadership theory, the study proposes that teleworkers’ perceived organizational support moderates the relationship between leaders’ influence tactics and their job stress in telework settings. We collected data via time-lagged surveys among 208 full-time employees in South Korean organizations that began teleworking after the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. The results showed that leaders’ soft tactics (i.e., behaviors used to elicit the followers’ voluntary acceptance of a request) and rational tactics (i.e., behaviors that exert influence by providing empirical evidence based on reason or logic) significantly reduced teleworkers’ job stress, which in turn lowered their turnover intention and increased their task performance. Moreover, these tactics and teleworkers’ perceived organizational support interact to influence the workers’ job stress. By examining how leaders’ influence tactics affect teleworkers’ psychological stress, task performance, and turnover intention in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, this study theoretically broadens the influence tactics literature, which previously focused primarily on face-to-face workers. The study concludes with a discussion about the implications of findings and limitations, along with areas for future research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Psychology and Behaviors during COVID-19)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop