Job-Related Stress, Burnout and Quality of Life

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X). This special issue belongs to the section "Organizational Behaviors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 May 2024 | Viewed by 7933

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Human and Social Sciences, Psychology and Educational Sciences Department, Psychology Research Centre, University of Algarve, 8005-139 Faro, Portugal
Interests: organizational psychology; occupational health psychology; gender studies – gender issues in work and organizations

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Guest Editor
Department of Administrative Sciences, Federal University of Santa Maria, Santa Maria 97105-900, Brazil
Interests: occupational behavior; behavioral diseases; innovative behavior; quantitative methods

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Human and Social Sciences, Psychology and Educational Sciences Department, Psychology Research Centre (CIP) / University of Algarve, Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro, Portugal
Interests: social health psychology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In today's fast-paced and competitive world, job-related stress and burnout have become prevalent issues that significantly impact individuals' quality of life. The demanding nature of modern work environments, coupled with increasing expectations and responsibilities, often lead to excessive stress levels and ultimately, burnout. This phenomenon is not only detrimental to the well-being of employees but also has far-reaching implications for organizations and society as a whole.

Job-related stress refers to the emotional, mental, and physical strain experienced by individuals as a result of their work demands. Factors such as heavy workloads, tight deadlines, long working hours, interpersonal conflicts, and a lack of control over work-related decisions contribute to heightened stress levels. Prolonged exposure to such stressors can eventually lead to burnout, which is characterized by feelings of exhaustion, cynicism, and a reduced sense of personal accomplishment. Burnout not only affects individuals' performance and productivity but also has significant repercussions on their mental health and overall quality of life.

The quality of life encompasses various dimensions, including physical health, mental well-being, social relationships, and overall life satisfaction. Job-related stress and burnout have been shown to negatively impact each of these dimensions. Physically, chronic stress can lead to health problems such as cardiovascular diseases, musculoskeletal disorders, and weakened immune system functioning. Mentally, it can contribute to anxiety, depression, and decreased cognitive abilities. Socially, stress and burnout can strain relationships and hinder individuals' ability to engage in leisure activities or spend quality time with loved ones. Consequently, the overall quality of life deteriorates, leading to decreased happiness and life satisfaction.

Addressing job-related stress and burnout is crucial for promoting a healthy work environment and improving individuals' quality of life. Employers play a vital role in implementing strategies and policies that support work-life balance, provide opportunities for skill development and advancement, encourage open communication, and promote employee well-being. Likewise, individuals need to prioritize self-care, set boundaries, practice stress management techniques, and seek support when needed.

By recognizing and addressing job-related stress and burnout, we can create a more sustainable and fulfilling work culture that enhances the well-being and quality of life of individuals, leading to increased job satisfaction, productivity, and overall societal well-being.

Dr. Joana Vieira-dos Santos
Dr. Luís Felipe Dias Lopes
Dr. Alexandra Isabel Da Silva Gomes
Dr. Sónia P. Gonçalves
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • Job stress
  • burnout
  • quality of life

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 950 KiB  
Article
Underemployment, Work Needs, and Job Satisfaction: Does Social Support Matter?
by Furkan Kirazci and Aysenur Buyukgoze-Kavas
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(4), 335; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14040335 - 17 Apr 2024
Viewed by 229
Abstract
Global problems that have emerged in recent years have caused an increase in underemployment rates, especially in developing countries. Researchers emphasize that underemployment has as many negative consequences as unemployment on well-being. In order to examine the variables that may buffer these consequences, [...] Read more.
Global problems that have emerged in recent years have caused an increase in underemployment rates, especially in developing countries. Researchers emphasize that underemployment has as many negative consequences as unemployment on well-being. In order to examine the variables that may buffer these consequences, we draw on the Psychology of Working Theory to propose a model in which a mediating role of psychological needs and a moderating role of social support are assumed in the relationship between underemployment and job satisfaction. We collected and analyzed data from 459 Turkish employees (181 women and 278 men) and found that underemployment was negatively related to job satisfaction and that work needs satisfaction mediated the relationship between underemployment and job satisfaction. Further, social support moderated the relationship between subjective underemployment and job satisfaction, so it was insignificant when social support was higher. These findings provide researchers and practitioners with a different perspective on underemployment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Job-Related Stress, Burnout and Quality of Life)
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21 pages, 1256 KiB  
Article
The Effects of Job Stress on Burnout and Turnover Intention: The Moderating Effects of Job Security and Financial Dependency
by Engin Üngüren, Neslihan Onur, Hüsne Demirel and Ömer Akgün Tekin
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(4), 322; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14040322 - 12 Apr 2024
Viewed by 377
Abstract
(1) Background: The hospitality industry is known for exposing employees to work stress, which can lead to work-related burnout and high turnover rates. This study aims to examine the relationships between work stress, work-related burnout, and turnover intention. It also explores the mediating [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The hospitality industry is known for exposing employees to work stress, which can lead to work-related burnout and high turnover rates. This study aims to examine the relationships between work stress, work-related burnout, and turnover intention. It also explores the mediating role of work-related burnout and the moderating role of job security and financial dependence. (2) Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 494 hotel employees working in five-star hotels in Belek and Manavgat, Türkiye, using a moderated mediation research model. The study found that work stress increases work-related burnout, which in turn increases turnover intention. Additionally, work-related burnout was found to mediate the relationship between work stress and turnover intention. Furthermore, it was found that perceived job security moderates the relationship between work stress levels and work-related burnout. Additionally, the variable of financial dependence was found to moderate the relationship between employees’ levels of work-related burnout and their turnover intentions. Similarly, the study found that the financial dependence variable moderates the effect of work-related burnout on employees’ turnover intention. Additionally, the study found that employees’ perception of job security moderates the impact of work stress on work-related burnout. In conclusion, the study suggests that positive perceptions of job security can mitigate the impact of work stress on work-related burnout. Similarly, the impact of work-related burnout on turnover intention diminishes as the degree of financial dependence rises. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Job-Related Stress, Burnout and Quality of Life)
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16 pages, 436 KiB  
Article
Determinants of Quality of Life (QoL) in Female Caregivers in Elderly Care Facilities in Korea
by Hee-Kyung Kim and Hye-Suk Oh
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(1), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14010053 - 15 Jan 2024
Viewed by 983
Abstract
Background: The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of general characteristics, fatigue, depression, self-efficacy, job stress and interpersonal relationships on the quality of life (QoL) of caregivers in nursing hospitals and use them as basic data for intervention programs to [...] Read more.
Background: The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of general characteristics, fatigue, depression, self-efficacy, job stress and interpersonal relationships on the quality of life (QoL) of caregivers in nursing hospitals and use them as basic data for intervention programs to improve the quality of life of caregivers. Methods: The participants in the study were 137 caregivers, aged 52–76, who were actively working in nursing hospitals. Data were collected from caregivers by visiting 9 hospitals in 6 cities, with a questionnaire of fatigue, depression, self-efficacy, job stress, interpersonal relationship, quality of life. Results: Age, marriage, marital satisfaction, education, education experience of QoL, monthly income, perceived economic status, hobby or leisure activity, and number of disease showed differences in the degree of QoL at a statistically significant level. In stage 1, economic status (β = −0.18, p = 0.033) and hobby or leisure activity (β = 0.19, p = 0.025) were influencing factors (F = 4.58, p < 0.001). In stage 2, monthly income (β = −0.19, p = 0.034) and perceived economic status (β = −0.18, p = 0.035) were influencing factors. In stage 3, age (β = −2.80, p = 0.006), perceived economic status (β = −2.41, p = 0.017), self-efficacy (β = 3.19, p = 0.002) and interpersonal relationship (β = 7.12, p < 0.001) were influencing factors which showed 61.5% explanatory power (F = 12.88, p < 0.001). Since the subject’s fatigue, depression, and stress did not affect the quality of life, further research is needed. Conclusions: In order to improve the quality of life of caregivers, it would be necessary to develop interventions for raising their self-efficacy and interpersonal relationship by considering their degree of economic status, hobby or leisure activity, monthly income, and age. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Job-Related Stress, Burnout and Quality of Life)
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17 pages, 729 KiB  
Article
Technostress, Quality of Work Life, and Job Performance: A Moderated Mediation Model
by Farida Saleem and Muhammad Imran Malik
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(12), 1014; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13121014 - 15 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1605
Abstract
This study examines the effect of technostress on teachers’ quality of work life and job performance. A moderated mediation model is proposed and tested based on the transactional model of stress and coping. This study proposes organizational flexibility as the boundary condition—a first-level [...] Read more.
This study examines the effect of technostress on teachers’ quality of work life and job performance. A moderated mediation model is proposed and tested based on the transactional model of stress and coping. This study proposes organizational flexibility as the boundary condition—a first-level moderator—and quality of work life as the explanatory variable. A sample of 199 university teachers who worked from home or used the hybrid teaching mode was selected. Data were collected through closed-ended questionnaires. Structural equation modeling (SEM) and the Hayes PROCESS Macro (extension in SPSS) were used for hypothesis testing. The results found that the three dimensions of technostress (Techno complexity, Techno invasion, and Techno overload) negatively and significantly affect teachers’ quality of work life. However, there are significant positive direct effects of these three dimensions of technostress on employee performance and significant negative indirect effects on performance through quality of work life. Organizational flexibility acts as a significant moderator, where a low value of organizational flexibility enhances the negative relationship between technostress and quality of work life. In contrast, high values of organizational flexibility convert the significant negative relationship into an insignificant impact. The university management must take measures to overcome technostress among teachers by showing flexibility. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Job-Related Stress, Burnout and Quality of Life)
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12 pages, 1020 KiB  
Article
Stress, Resilience, Burnout and Study Hours in Physical Education Pre-Service Teachers—An Explanatory Model about Gender
by Eduardo Melguizo-Ibáñez, Gabriel González-Valero, José Manuel Alonso-Vargas, Rafael Caracuel-Cáliz, Manuel Ortega-Caballero and Pilar Puertas-Molero
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(11), 946; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13110946 - 17 Nov 2023
Viewed by 982
Abstract
The process of becoming a public teacher in Spain requires a long period of preparation. This long period of preparation has an impact on the psychosocial environment of the candidates. Differences have been observed in the psychosocial area according to gender in pre-service [...] Read more.
The process of becoming a public teacher in Spain requires a long period of preparation. This long period of preparation has an impact on the psychosocial environment of the candidates. Differences have been observed in the psychosocial area according to gender in pre-service teachers. This research aims to study the relationship between the study hours per day, stress, burnout syndrome and resilience according to gender and to study the differences in the effects according to gender using multigroup equation modeling. A multigroup structural equation analysis has been proposed according to the gender of the participants. Parametric tests were used for the descriptive analysis of the results. The sample consists of 4117 participants, 1363 males and 2754 females. The instruments used to collect the data were a self-made questionnaire, Perceived Stress Questionnaire, Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale and Maslach Burnout Inventory. All the instruments have been validated and adapted to the sample. The data reveal that there are variations in the effects of the variables according to the gender of the participants. In conclusion, it is affirmed that gender is a very important factor in coping with the competitive examination process for state-public-teaching institutions, as well as in avoiding the appearance of disruptive states generated by this preparation process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Job-Related Stress, Burnout and Quality of Life)
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13 pages, 1277 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Craniosacral Therapy on Blood Levels of Stress Hormones in Male Firefighter Cadets: A Randomized Clinical Trial
by Małgorzata Wójcik, Bruno Bordoni, Idzi Siatkowski and Ewa Żekanowska
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(11), 914; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13110914 - 08 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2589
Abstract
(1) Background: Fire department cadets preparing to become firefighters and paramedics experience high levels of stress when participating in incidents like traffic accidents and fires. Stress adversely affects health, and coping with it proves difficult. Unfortunately, there is no single method that reduces [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Fire department cadets preparing to become firefighters and paramedics experience high levels of stress when participating in incidents like traffic accidents and fires. Stress adversely affects health, and coping with it proves difficult. Unfortunately, there is no single method that reduces stress completely in humans. One non-invasive method for lowering stress hormone levels is craniosacral therapy. (2) Methods: Fifty-seven firefighting cadets aged 18–24 years (21.63 ± 1.41) participated in the study. They were randomly assigned to either a test group or a control group. Participants’ blood levels of cortisol and CRH (corticotropin-releasing hormone) were assessed before and after the study. The study group underwent 5-week craniosacral therapy (1× per week). (3) Results: The Kruskal–Wallis test showed that the therapy group’s results were statistically significant for CRH values (p-value = 0.00067) and for cortisol values (p-value ≤ 0.0001). Wilxocon and Dunn tests showed statistical significance for cortisol after CS therapy between the control and study groups (p = 0.0377), and for CRH between the control and study groups before (p = 0.00634) and after the study (p = 0.000887), and in the study group before and after the study (p = 0.0101). (4) Conclusions: The application of craniosacral therapy reduced stress hormone levels in male firefighter cadets. The results indicate that craniosacral therapy (five sessions, one per week) has an effect on the reduction of stress hormones. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Job-Related Stress, Burnout and Quality of Life)
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