Special Issue "Zinc-Ion Batteries: Issues and Opportunities"

A special issue of Batteries (ISSN 2313-0105). This special issue belongs to the section "Battery Materials and Interfaces: Anode, Cathode, Separators and Electrolytes or Others".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2023 | Viewed by 5946

Special Issue Editors

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Benjamin M. Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA
Interests: rechargeable aqueous Zn-ion, Zn-air, Li-ion and Li-S batteries; solar thermochemical hydrogen (STCH) production; chemical looping; PEM, AEM, alkaline and solid oxide water electrolysis and fuel cells; gas sensors; electrocatalysis; water treatment; heterogeneous catalysis; supercapacitors; synchrotron and neutron powder diffraction
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA
Interests: aqueous zinc-ion batteries; solid oxide electrochemical cell (SOFC) stack operation stability; metal-support SOFC fabrication; protonic ceramic electrolysis cells; solar thermochemical hydrogen production

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue on zinc-ion batteries focuses on the fundamentals, challenges, and the latest exciting developments in Zn-ion battery research. Zn-ion batteries with aqueous electrolytes featuring compelling price-points, competitive performance, and enhanced safety represent advanced energy storage chemistry as a promising alternative to current lithium-ion battery systems. This Special Issue will cover the key topics in cathode material development, electrolyte exploration, zinc anodes protection/modification, novel anode material development, understanding of battery mechanisms, and diverse applications in energy storage systems, portable electronics, and flexible devices.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to: 

  • Novel design of highly reversible Zn anodes;
  • Optimization of aqueous or organic electrolytes and additives;
  • Cathode materials and their energy storage mechanisms;
  • Mechanisms of electrochemical activation, insertion, and conversion;
  • Cation mobility, electrode/electrolyte interface, and electrolyte decomposition;
  • Safety failure analysis;
  • High energy density and long-life operation;
  • Performance lifetime and degradation studies;
  • In-situ characterization for mechanistic understanding;
  • Advanced techniques that overcome the current critical issues;
  • Future perspectives and research directions;
  • Low-temperature zinc batteries;
  • Non-flammable zinc batteries;
  • Redox flow-based zinc batteries;
  • Flexible Zn-ion batteries;
  • Alkaline Zn batteries.

Dr. Wei Li
Dr. Hanchen Tian
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Batteries is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • zinc-ion batteries
  • cathode
  • electrolyte
  • zn anode
  • flexible batteries
  • wearable devices
  • hybrid batteries

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 3043 KiB  
Article
Defect Chemistry in Zn3V4(PO4)6
Batteries 2023, 9(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/batteries9010005 - 22 Dec 2022
Viewed by 1276
Abstract
Zinc-ion batteries have attracted great interest for their low cost, safety, and high energy density. Recently, Zn3V4(PO4)6 has been reported to be a promising cathode material for zinc-ion batteries. The defect chemistry, diffusion of Zn-ions, and [...] Read more.
Zinc-ion batteries have attracted great interest for their low cost, safety, and high energy density. Recently, Zn3V4(PO4)6 has been reported to be a promising cathode material for zinc-ion batteries. The defect chemistry, diffusion of Zn-ions, and solution of dopants are examined by advanced simulation techniques. The simulation results show that the most favorable intrinsic defect is the Zn-V anti-site. A zig-zag pattern of long-range Zn2+ diffusion is observed and the activation energy of 1.88 eV indicates that the ionic conductivity of this material is low. The most promising isovalent dopants on the Zn site are Ca2+ and Fe2+. Although the solution of Ga3+, Sc3+, In3+, Y3+, Gd3+, and La3+ on the V site is exoergic, the most promising is In3+. Different reaction routes for the formation of Zn3V4(PO4)6 are considered and the most thermodynamically favorable reaction consists of binary oxides (ZnO, V2O3, and P2O5) as reactants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Zinc-Ion Batteries: Issues and Opportunities)
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Review

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46 pages, 10241 KiB  
Review
An Overview of Challenges and Strategies for Stabilizing Zinc Anodes in Aqueous Rechargeable Zn-Ion Batteries
Batteries 2023, 9(1), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/batteries9010041 - 05 Jan 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3947
Abstract
Aqueous rechargeable zinc ion batteries (ZIBs) have been revived and are considered a promising candidate for scalable electrochemical energy storage systems due to their intrinsic safety, low cost, large abundance, mature recyclability, competitive electrochemical performance, and sustainability. However, the deployment of aqueous rechargeable [...] Read more.
Aqueous rechargeable zinc ion batteries (ZIBs) have been revived and are considered a promising candidate for scalable electrochemical energy storage systems due to their intrinsic safety, low cost, large abundance, mature recyclability, competitive electrochemical performance, and sustainability. However, the deployment of aqueous rechargeable ZIBs is still hampered by the poor electrochemical stability and reversibility of Zn anodes, which is a common, inherent issue for most metal-based anodes. This review presents a comprehensive and timely overview of the challenges and strategies of Zn anodes toward durable ZIBs. First, several challenges that significantly reduce the Coulombic efficiency and cycling stability of Zn anodes are briefly discussed including dendrite formation, hydrogen evolution, and corrosion. Then, the mitigation strategies are summarized in terms of modifying the electrode/electrolyte interfaces, designing electrode structures, and optimizing electrolytes and separators. Further, we comprehensively discuss the mechanisms behind these issues and improvement strategies with respect to the anodes, electrolytes, and separators. Lastly, we provide perspectives and critical analyses of remaining challenges, outlook, and future direction for accelerating the practical application of aqueous rechargeable ZIBs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Zinc-Ion Batteries: Issues and Opportunities)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Materials development and prospective for Zinc-Ion Batteries
Authors: Yanliang Liang
Affiliation: Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Texas Center for Supercondutivity at the University of Houston (TcSUH), University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204, USA

Title: Towards the Next Generation of Zinc-Ion Batteries with long-life and highly reversible electrode
Authors: Rafael Trócoli
Affiliation: Universidad de Córdoba: Cordoba, Andalucía, ES

Title: Mild liquid-phase synthesis of NaV6O15 as advanced cathode material for Zinc-ion Batteries
Authors: Max LARRY, Edith ROEX, Frédéric BOSCHINI, Bénédicte VERTRUYEN, Abdelfattah MAHMOUD
Affiliation: GREEnMat, CESAM Research Unit, University of Liège, 4000 Liège, Belgium
Abstract: Preparation of NaV6O15 through a mild liquid-phase process needs a special mastery of the synthesis parameters. Due to the versatility of the solid-liquid synthesizing procedure, different phases can be obtained, depending on the chosen reactional parameters. Just like other sodium vanadates, it finds its application in zinc-ion batteries (ZIBs) as promising cathode material that can outperform the current benchmarking vanadium-based cathode material, V2O5, in terms of convenience and stability. Thanks to structural and electrochemical analyses, new insights, and presumptions on the structural changes during the synthesis and the electrochemical cycling could be established. The spaced structure of sodium vanadate materials conveniently represses the activation phase, generally observed for V2O5. Furthermore, the insertion of sodium ions between the V2O5 layers stabilizes the crystallographic structure of the material and allows a long life cycle. And despite the added sodium ions, NaV6O15 cathode material delivers high reversible capacities of 370 mAh∙g⁻¹ at 0.1 A∙g⁻¹.

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