Music Perception in Cochlear Implant Recipients

A special issue of Audiology Research (ISSN 2039-4349).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2023) | Viewed by 3553

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, University Clinic St. Poelten, Dunant-Platz 1, 3100 St. Poelten, Austria
Interests: cochlear implants; otology; music therapy; rehablitation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nowadays Cochlear implantation is a routine procedure in the hearing rehabilitation of prelingual and postlingual deaf children and postlingual deaf adults. The beneficial effects on speech understanding and speech perception are studied widely. The significant improvements in communication and Quality of Life aspects after implantation have been highlighted in numerous studies. Nevertheless, many Cochlear Implant recipients, especially the postlingual deaf, report, that although they have a very good speech understanding, listening to music and especially being able to enjoy music may be improved. For those patients, Music Therapy is highly recommended; especially since many international rehabilitation programs for CI users do not focus on music in their training programs. To show the effect of Music Therapy in Cochlear Implant recipients’ objective studies are needed; in particular as an explanation and justification of this supporting instrument in Rehabilitation. 

The aim of this Special Issue on Music Therapy, therefore, is to highlight the importance and also broadcast the benefit of Music Therapy on music perception and self-awareness of CI users. Authors are encouraged to submit their detailed Music Therapy program as well as their experience and the reports of their clients of all ages.

Prof. Dr. Georg Mathias Sprinzl
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Audiology Research is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cochlear implants
  • music therapy
  • rehablitation
  • quality of life
  • outcomes

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

10 pages, 836 KiB  
Article
Objective and Subjective Assessment of Music Perception and Musical Experiences in Young Cochlear Implant Users
by Miryam Calvino, Alejandro Zuazua-González, Javier Gavilán and Luis Lassaletta
Audiol. Res. 2024, 14(1), 86-95; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres14010008 - 18 Jan 2024
Viewed by 852
Abstract
For many individuals, music has a significant impact on the quality and enjoyability of life. Cochlear implant (CI) users must cope with the constraints that the CI imposes on music perception. Here, we assessed the musical experiences of young CI users and age-matched [...] Read more.
For many individuals, music has a significant impact on the quality and enjoyability of life. Cochlear implant (CI) users must cope with the constraints that the CI imposes on music perception. Here, we assessed the musical experiences of young CI users and age-matched controls with normal hearing (NH). CI users and NH peers were divided into subgroups according to age: children and adolescents. Participants were tested on their ability to recognize vocal and instrumental music and instruments. A music questionnaire for pediatric populations (MuQPP) was also used. CI users and NH peers identified a similar percentage of vocal music. CI users were significantly worse at recognizing instruments (p < 0.05) and instrumental music (p < 0.05). CI users scored similarly to NH peers on the MuQPP, except for the musical frequency domain, where CI users in the children subgroup scored higher than their NH peers (p = 0.009). For CI users in the children subgroup, the identification of instrumental music was positively correlated with music importance (p = 0.029). Young CI users have significant deficits in some aspects of music perception (instrumental music and instrument identification) but have similar scores to NH peers in terms of interest in music, frequency of music exposure, and importance of music. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Music Perception in Cochlear Implant Recipients)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

10 pages, 563 KiB  
Review
Efferent Control in Musicians: A Review
by Francisca Acuña, Rodrigo Jeria, Elisabeth Pavez and Enzo Aguilar-Vidal
Audiol. Res. 2023, 13(1), 76-85; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres13010007 - 6 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1328
Abstract
It is widely established that musicians possess a higher level in certain auditory perceptual abilities when compared to non-musicians. This improvement may be mediated, at least in part, by changes in the cochlear response induced by reflex activation of the olivocochlear efferent system. [...] Read more.
It is widely established that musicians possess a higher level in certain auditory perceptual abilities when compared to non-musicians. This improvement may be mediated, at least in part, by changes in the cochlear response induced by reflex activation of the olivocochlear efferent system. In this review, we describe and analyze the scientific evidence regarding possible differences in the efferent response in musicians and non-musicians. The main evidence observed is that musicians present a greater robustness of the efferent olivocochlear reflex when measured by suppression of otoacoustic emissions and compared to non-musicians. Analyzing the articles presented in this review, it is possible to point out that the differential role of the efferent effect in musicians is not yet established. There is not enough evidence to support the idea that the olivocochlear system favors comparative changes in the properties of musicians’ auditory filters. New studies with psychoacoustic techniques, among others, are needed to measure the effect of the olivocochlear reflex on tuning, gain, compression, or temporal resolution in musicians and non-musicians. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Music Perception in Cochlear Implant Recipients)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

10 pages, 549 KiB  
Case Report
Effects of Musical Training in Music Therapy Following Cochlear Implantation—A Case Report
by Astrid Magele, Bianca Wirthner, Philipp Schoerg and Georg M. Sprinzl
Audiol. Res. 2024, 14(2), 217-226; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres14020020 - 22 Feb 2024
Viewed by 754
Abstract
The most prevalent sensory impairment impacting the elderly is age-related hearing loss (HL), which affects around 65% of individuals over the age of 60 years. This bilateral, symmetrical sensorineural impairment profoundly affects auditory perception, speech discrimination, and the overall understanding of auditory signals. [...] Read more.
The most prevalent sensory impairment impacting the elderly is age-related hearing loss (HL), which affects around 65% of individuals over the age of 60 years. This bilateral, symmetrical sensorineural impairment profoundly affects auditory perception, speech discrimination, and the overall understanding of auditory signals. Influenced by diverse factors, age-related HL can substantially influence an individual’s quality of life and mental health and can lead to depression. Cochlear implantation (CI) stands as a standard intervention, yet despite advancements, music perception challenges persist, which can be addressed with individualized music therapy. This case report describes the journey of an 81-year-old musician through profound sensorineural hearing loss, cochlear implantation, and rehabilitative music therapy. Auditory evaluations, musical exercises, and quality of life assessments highlighted meaningful improvements in music perception, auditory skills, and overall satisfaction post-implantation. Music therapy facilitated emotional, functional, and musical levels of engagement, notably enhancing his ability to perceive melody, rhythm, and different instruments. Moreover, subjective assessments and audiograms indicated marked improvements in auditory differentiation, music enjoyment, and overall hearing thresholds. This comprehensive approach integrating bilateral CIs and music therapy showcased audiological and quality of life enhancements in an elderly individual with profound hearing loss, emphasizing the efficacy of this combined treatment approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Music Perception in Cochlear Implant Recipients)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop