Personalized Medicine in Otolaryngology: Special Topic Otology—2nd Edition

A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426). This special issue belongs to the section "Personalized Therapy and Drug Delivery".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 October 2024 | Viewed by 735

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, University Clinic St. Poelten, Dunant-Platz 1, 3100 St. Poelten, Austria
2. Karl Landsteiner Institute of Implantable Hearing Devices, 3100 St. Poelten, Austria
Interests: otology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, University Clinic St. Poelten, Dunant-Platz 1, 3100 St. Poelten, Austria
2. Karl Landsteiner Institute of Implantable Hearing Devices, 3100 St. Poelten, Austria
Interests: otology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In collaboration with the Journal of Personalized Medicine (IF: 3.4), in my capacity as Guest Editor, I am helping to organize a Special Issue entitled “Personalized Medicine in Otolaryngology: Special Topic Otology—2nd Edition”. Globally, more than 1.5 billion people experience some degree of hearing loss. Of these, an estimated 432 million adults and 34 million children suffer from disabling hearing loss, that is, hearing loss of moderate or high severity in the better hearing ear (WHO World Report on Hearing, 2021). Disabling hearing loss and a lack of benefit from conventional hearing aids are essential indications for the use of implantable hearing systems. The type of hearing implant to be used is dictated by the hearing threshold, the underlying pathology, and the anatomical conditions of the patient.

This Special Issue on otology aims to give a broad overview of personalized hearing rehabilitation across all ages and indications (very young children, adults, and very old adults), different applications, as well as necessary rehabilitation options. The title is kept broad to cover all aspects of personalized treatment options and their positive impact on a patient’s quality of life, from auditory brainstem implants to cochlear implants, bone conduction implants, and middle-ear implants.

In the past several decades, the technology behind all the above-mentioned hearing implants has developed immensely. This Special Issue on otology aims to discuss and broadcast some of these recent achievements and even provide a perspective on future developments in hearing technology.

Prof. Dr. Georg Mathias Sprinzl
Dr. Astrid Magele
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Personalized Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cochlear implants in children, adults, and older adults
  • active middle-ear implants in children, adults, and the elderly
  • new indications in otology
  • active transcutaneous bone conduction implants in children, adults, and the elderly
  • hearing loss and cholesteatoma
  • implantable and non-implantable solutions for malformations
  • age-related hearing loss
  • single-sided deafness
  • cochlear implantation
  • otitis media
  • tinnitus
  • quality of life
  • burden of hearing loss
  • genetics and epigenetics of hearing loss
  • robotic surgery
  • novel biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of hearing loss
  • novel intra-operative objective measures for hearing implants
  • alternative treatment options to implantable devices
  • MRI

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

16 pages, 9611 KiB  
Article
Detailed Radiomorphometric Analysis of the Surgical Corridor for the Suprageniculate Approach
by Tomasz Wojciechowski, Nicola Bisi, Kazimierz Szopiński and Daniele Marchioni
J. Pers. Med. 2024, 14(5), 516; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm14050516 - 12 May 2024
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Abstract
Background: The suprageniculate fossa (SGF) is located between the geniculate ganglion, the middle cranial fossa (MCF) and the anterior semicircular canal (ASCC). An endoscopic transcanal approach has been recently proposed to treat the different lesions in this area. The aim of the study [...] Read more.
Background: The suprageniculate fossa (SGF) is located between the geniculate ganglion, the middle cranial fossa (MCF) and the anterior semicircular canal (ASCC). An endoscopic transcanal approach has been recently proposed to treat the different lesions in this area. The aim of the study is to describe the anatomical pathway of this approach by measuring the dimensions of its boundaries while checking their correlation with the pneumatization of the SGF area. Methods: This is a retrospective anatomical analysis of Cone Beam CT scans of 80 patients, for a total of 160 temporal bones analyzed. Two checkpoints were measured for the SGF route, as an internal and an external window. These are triangles between the MCF dura, the geniculate ganglion and the ASCC on parasagittal and axial planes. The pneumatization of the SGF was also assessed, classified and correlated with the measured dimensions. Results: The depth of the SGF was 7.5 ± 1.8 mm. The width of the external window was 7.5 ± 1.9, 5.6 ± 2.4 and 1.6 ± 1.6 mm for the posterior, middle and anterior points of measurement, respectively. The height of the internal window was 7.6 ± 1.2, 4.5 ± 1.5 and 1.7 ± 1.7 mm for the posterior, middle and anterior points of measurement, respectively. Type A pneumatization was found in 87 cases, type B in 34 and type C in 39. The degree of pneumatization directly correlated to the depth and height of the fossa. Conclusions: The suprageniculate approach route is defined by the internal and external windows which should be evaluated during a pre-surgery imaging assessment. The detailed anatomy of the approach and the novel classification of the pneumatization of the SGF are here described which may be useful to plan a safer procedure with minimal complications. Full article
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