Biometeorology

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2015)

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Rd, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
Interests: biosphere-atmosphere interactions; climate change; terrestrial remote sensing; GIS-ecology
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biometeorology, an interdisciplinary science that studies the interaction between the biosphere and its atmospheric environment, has become of increasing importance given observed and projected changes in the climate system. Acknowledging this importance, the journal Atmosphere plans to debut a special issue on Biometeorology. The theme of this issue is Vegetation and Climate Variability/Change. Original studies encompassing any topic in this theme are welcome for submission. All studies must contain a specific section on uncertainty analysis and discussion. Researchers are welcome to contact the Editor before submitting their manuscripts.

Robinson I. Negron-Juarez
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • land ecosystems
  • climate
  • current and future interactions
  • climate change

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

1878 KiB  
Article
Interactions between Climate, Land Use and Vegetation Fire Occurrences in El Salvador
by Dolors Armenteras, Cerian Gibbes, Carla A. Vivacqua, Juan Sebastián Espinosa, Wania Duleba, Fabio Goncalves and Christopher Castro
Atmosphere 2016, 7(2), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos7020026 - 6 Feb 2016
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 12561
Abstract
Vegetation burning is a global environmental threat that results in local ecological, economic and social impacts but also has large-scale implications for global change. The burning is usually a result of interacting factors such as climate, land use and vegetation type. Despite its [...] Read more.
Vegetation burning is a global environmental threat that results in local ecological, economic and social impacts but also has large-scale implications for global change. The burning is usually a result of interacting factors such as climate, land use and vegetation type. Despite its importance as a factor shaping ecological, economic and social processes, countries highly vulnerable to climate change in Central America, such as El Salvador, lack an assessment of this complex relationship. In this study we rely on remotely sensed measures of the Normalized Vegetation Difference Index (NDVI) and thermal anomaly detections by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor to identify vegetation cover changes and fire occurrences. We also use land use data and rainfall observations derived from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data to determine the spatial and temporal variability and interactions of these factors. Our results indicate a highly marked seasonality of fire occurrence linked to the climatic variability with a peak of fire occurrences in 2004 and 2013. Low vegetation indices occurred in March–April, around two months after the driest period of the year (December–February), corresponding to months with high detection of fires. Spatially, 65.6% of the fires were recurrent and clustered in agriculture/cropland areas and within 1 km of roads (70%) and only a 4.7% of fires detected were associated with forests. Remaining forests in El Salvador deserve more attention due to underestimated consequences of forest fires. The identification of these clear patterns can be used as a baseline to better shape management of fire regimes and support decision making in this country. Recommendations resulting from this work include focusing on fire risk models and agriculture fires and long-term ecological and economic consequences of those. Furthermore, El Salvador will need to include agricultural fires in the contribution to national accounts emissions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biometeorology)
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15889 KiB  
Article
The Role of Highly-Resolved Gust Speed in Simulations of Storm Damage in Forests at the Landscape Scale: A Case Study from Southwest Germany
by Christopher Jung, Dirk Schindler, Axel Tim Albrecht and Alexander Buchholz
Atmosphere 2016, 7(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos7010007 - 4 Jan 2016
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 6127
Abstract
Routinely collected booking records of salvaged timber from the period 1979–2008 were used to empirically model the (1) storm damage probability; (2) proportions of storm-damaged timber and (3) endemic storm damage risk in the forest area of the German federal state of Baden-Wuerttemberg [...] Read more.
Routinely collected booking records of salvaged timber from the period 1979–2008 were used to empirically model the (1) storm damage probability; (2) proportions of storm-damaged timber and (3) endemic storm damage risk in the forest area of the German federal state of Baden-Wuerttemberg by applying random forests. Results from cross-validated predictor importance evaluation demonstrate that the relative impact of modeled gust speed fields on the predictive accuracy of the random forests models was greatest compared to the impact of forest and soil features. Forest areas prone to storm damage occurring within a period of five years were mainly located in mountainous upland regions where maximum gust speed exceeds 31 m/s in a five-year return period and conifers dominate the tree species composition. While mean storm damage probability continuously increased with increasing statistical gust speed proportions of storm-damaged timber peaked at a statistical maximum gust speed value of 29 m/s occurring in a five-year return period. Combining the statistical gust speed field with daily gust speed fields of two exceptional winter storms improved model accuracy and considerably increased the explained variance. Endemic storm damage risk was calculated from endemic storm damage probability and proportions of endemically storm-damaged timber. In combination with knowledge of local experts the storm damage risk modeled in a 50 m × 50 m resolution raster dataset can easily be used to identify areas prone to storm damage and to adapt silvicultural management regimes to make forests more windfirm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biometeorology)
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