Numerical Simulation of Aerosol Microphysical Processes

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Aerosols".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 3166

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
Interests: aerosol modeling; climate models; aerosol–cloud interaction

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Guest Editor
Institute of Environment and Climate Research, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, China
Interests: stratosphere-troposphere exchange; stratospheric chemistry; climate numerical model development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Aerosol microphysical processes are simulated in a wide variety of numerical models. From emission to removal, the life cycle of aerosols are treated with different levels of complexity. The performance of the simulation largely quantifies the modeled properties of aerosols, such as particle size distribution, number and mass concentrations, optical properties, hygroscopicity, etc.. These properties define the impact of aerosols on a broad range of issues related to human health, air quality, and climate through their influences on atmospheric chemistry, radiative forcing, cloud formation, and the hydrological cycle.

The aim of this Special Issue is to showcase the most recent advances in the numerical simulation of aerosol microphysical processes. We encourage the submission of manuscripts about innovations of simulations at the process level, including, but not limited to, emission of aerosols and precursor gases, nucleation/new particle formation, secondary formation of organics/inorganics aerosols, aging of preexisting aerosols, cloud droplet activation, wet scavenging, and dry deposition. The numerical models of interest include, but are not limited to, aerosol dynamical models, cloud resolving models, air quality models, chemical transport models, weather prediction models, and regional/global climate models. We also welcome the submission of research on the linkage of aerosol microphysical properties to environmental and climatic impacts through the use of numerical models. 

Dr. Tianyi Fan
Dr. Pengfei Yu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • aerosol microphysical processes
  • numerical simulation
  • aerosol and precursor gas emission
  • new particle formation
  • secondary aerosol formation
  • aging of aerosols
  • cloud formation
  • aerosol wet and dry removal
  • aerosol climate effect
  • aerosol impacts on environment

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 7600 KiB  
Article
Investigating Nonlinear Dynamics in Atmospheric Aerosols during the Transition from Laminar to Turbulent Flow
by Marius Mihai Cazacu, Alin Iulian Roșu, Razvan Vasile Ababei, Adrian Roșu, Decebal Vasincu, Dragoș Constantin Nica, Oana Rusu, Andreea Bianca Bruma and Maricel Agop
Atmosphere 2024, 15(3), 366; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos15030366 - 17 Mar 2024
Viewed by 833
Abstract
This paper investigates the nonlinear dynamics of atmospheric aerosols during the transition from laminar to turbulent flows using the framework of Scale Relativity Theory. It is proposed that the transition from multifractal to non-multifractal scales (in the dynamics of the atmospheric aerosols) can [...] Read more.
This paper investigates the nonlinear dynamics of atmospheric aerosols during the transition from laminar to turbulent flows using the framework of Scale Relativity Theory. It is proposed that the transition from multifractal to non-multifractal scales (in the dynamics of the atmospheric aerosols) can be assimilated to the transition between laminar and turbulent states. These transitions are determined by the multifractal diffusion and deposition processes. The methodology used involves the application of the principle of scale covariance, which states that the laws of atmospheric physics remain invariant with respect to spatial and temporal transformations as well as scale transformations. Based on this principle, several conservation laws are constructed. In such context, the conservation law of the density of states associated with the multifractal-non-multifractal scale transition in a one-dimensional case is then considered. The model describes the non-linear behaviour of atmospheric aerosols undergoing diffusion and deposition processes. The theoretical approach was correlated using experimental data from a ceilometer and radar reflectivity factor data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Numerical Simulation of Aerosol Microphysical Processes)
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13 pages, 3059 KiB  
Article
The Assessment of PM2.5 and PM10 Immission in Atmospheric Air in a Climate Chamber during Tests of an Electric Car on a Chassis Dynamometer
by Artur Jaworski, Krzysztof Balawender, Hubert Kuszewski and Mirosław Jaremcio
Atmosphere 2024, 15(3), 270; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos15030270 - 23 Feb 2024
Viewed by 674
Abstract
Electric cars, like internal combustion vehicles, emit particulate pollution from non-exhaust systems, i.e., tires and brakes, which is included in the Euro 7 emission standard planned for implementation. Tests conducted on chassis dynamometers are accompanied by particulate emissions from non-exhaust systems, which are [...] Read more.
Electric cars, like internal combustion vehicles, emit particulate pollution from non-exhaust systems, i.e., tires and brakes, which is included in the Euro 7 emission standard planned for implementation. Tests conducted on chassis dynamometers are accompanied by particulate emissions from non-exhaust systems, which are introduced into the ambient air on the test bench. Particulate emissions tests from non-engine systems on chassis dynamometers are mainly aimed at measuring the mass or number of particulates from tires and brakes. In contrast, little attention is paid to the immission of particulate matter from tires and brakes on the dynamometer during tests, which in the case of electric cars include, for example, measurements of energy consumption or range. Therefore, in order to draw attention to the problem of these emissions, the authors carried out measurements of PM2.5 and PM10 immissions into the air in the climatic chamber during tests of an electric car on a chassis dynamometer. The car tests were carried out in accordance with the WLTC (Worldwide harmonized Light duty Test Cycle) and at constant speed. Based on the test results, a model was proposed for the immission of particulate matter in laboratory air from tire and brake abrasion, taking traffic parameters into account. The results and the developed model show that air quality, in terms of particulate content, deteriorates significantly during testing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Numerical Simulation of Aerosol Microphysical Processes)
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13 pages, 3506 KiB  
Article
Optimization of Vibrating Mesh Nebulizer Air Inlet Structure for Pulmonary Drug Delivery
by Yu Liu, Xiaole Chen, Zhengqi Li, Huizhen Yang and Jianwei Wang
Atmosphere 2023, 14(10), 1509; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos14101509 - 29 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1186
Abstract
The vibrating mesh nebulizer (VMN) has gained popularity for its compactness and noiselessness. This study investigates the impact of different air inlet structures on the deposition fraction (DF) of droplets generated by VMNs in an idealized mouth–throat (MT) airway model. Three homemade VMNs [...] Read more.
The vibrating mesh nebulizer (VMN) has gained popularity for its compactness and noiselessness. This study investigates the impact of different air inlet structures on the deposition fraction (DF) of droplets generated by VMNs in an idealized mouth–throat (MT) airway model. Three homemade VMNs with semi-circular inlet, symmetrical four-inlet, and multiple-orifice inlet structures were evaluated through simulations and experiments. The changes in droplet DF of 0.9% w/v concentration of nebulized sodium chloride (NaCl) droplets as a function of inertial parameters were acquired under different inhalation flow conditions. Additionally, flow field distributions in models with different inlet structures were analyzed at a steady inspiratory flow rate of 15 L/min. The results indicate that optimizing the VMN’s air inlet structure significantly enhances droplet delivery efficiency. The multiple–orifice inlet structure outperformed the other designs, directing the airflow from the inlet position to the center of the mouthpiece and then into the oral cavity, achieving a DF of up to 20% at an inhalation flow rate of 15 L/min. The region of high airflow velocity between the mouthpiece and oral cavity proved to be a favorable VMN inlet optimization, reducing direct droplet–wall collisions and improving delivery efficiency. These findings offer insights for VMN design and optimization to enhance pulmonary drug delivery effectiveness and therapeutic outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Numerical Simulation of Aerosol Microphysical Processes)
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