Pollution Control Chemistry II

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical and Molecular Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 5327

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Guest Editor
Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Engineering and Management, “Cristofor Simionescu” Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection, “Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, 700050 Iasi, Romania
Interests: environmental engineering and management; environmental chemistry (atmosphere, water, soil/subsoil chemistry); analysis and control of environment pollution; water and wastewater treatment systems; elements of environmental monitoring and/or risk control; optimization of some processes applied for environmental protection; environmental assessments; waste management; energy and the environment, chemical engineering
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to invite you to contribute with an original research paper, a review article or hot topic for Applied Sciences, on a Special Issue called “Pollution Control Chemistry”, for peer-review and possible publication.

As is already known, the quality management of all environmental components (i.e., atmosphere, water, soil/subsoil, etc.) and its subareas of environmental remediation or treatment becomes a key issue in the environmental policy of all countries, and a few targets are already recommended until 2020, or 2030. One of such key targets was that of fulfillment of adequate recommended quality of environmental components in each country, especially for local/regional atmosphere and surface waters/underground waters in which a lot of direct discharges (wanted and nonwanted/accidental) of final effluents and uncontrolled wastes are periodically produced. The assessment of environmental quality around/in the vicinity of a such a discharging section is recommended to be continuously controlled for any pollution episode identification and, thereafter, remediation action implementation.

Periodic control of environment quality through common and specific analysis of its physical, chemical, microbiological, and biological characteristics is a continuous agreed and viable action useful for identification of any pollution level increase and also pollution sources and selection of a corresponding remediation plan.

Original unpublished research reports, or review articles on environmental pollution control and its subareas of new advanced environmental analysis methods and associated environment characterization, pollution level assessment, supervising monitoring and remediation/depollution/treatment action implementation are invited to be submitted for possible publishing in this special issue.

Dr. Carmen Zaharia
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • environmental analysis and control
  • environmental chemistry
  • environment characteristic
  • environmental remediation/depollution
  • monitoring
  • quality
  • treatment

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 2432 KiB  
Article
Trapping and Methanation of CO2 in a Domestic Microwave Oven Using Combinations of Sorbents and Catalysts
by Loren Acher, Tristan Laredo, Thierry Caillot, Akim Kaddouri and Frederic C. Meunier
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(23), 12536; https://doi.org/10.3390/app132312536 - 21 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1654
Abstract
CO2 trapping and methanation allow to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and recycle CO2 into a sustainable fuel, provided renewable H2 is employed. Microwave (MW)-based reactors provide an efficient means to use electrical energy for upgrading chemicals, since MW can selectively [...] Read more.
CO2 trapping and methanation allow to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and recycle CO2 into a sustainable fuel, provided renewable H2 is employed. Microwave (MW)-based reactors provide an efficient means to use electrical energy for upgrading chemicals, since MW can selectively heat up the load placed in the reactor and not the reactor itself. In this study, CO2 capture and methanation were investigated using solid adsorbents (ZrO2 and Fe3O4), microwave absorbers (SiC and Fe3O4) and Ru/SiO2 as CO2 the methanation catalyst. The sorption and catalyst beds were located in a domestic MW oven that was used to trigger CO2 desorption and methanation in the presence of H2. The working Fe-based structure turned out to be a mixture of FeO and Fe, which allowed for MW absorption and local heating; it also acted as a CO2 sorbent and reverse water–gas shift catalyst. Various reactor configurations were used, leading to different performances and selectivity to CO and CH4. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of its kind showing the potential of using inexpensive microwave technology to readily convert trapped CO2 into valuable products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pollution Control Chemistry II)
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15 pages, 1982 KiB  
Article
Reduction of Water Color in a Spinning Disc Reactor
by Eugenia Teodora Iacob-Tudose, Carmen Zaharia and Nicoleta Melniciuc-Puica
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(20), 10253; https://doi.org/10.3390/app122010253 - 12 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 986
Abstract
In this study, spinning disc (SD) technology was successfully applied to a synthetic water to remove its color. The preliminary data performed in a regular mixing system using a potential adsorptive material, i.e., double-layered hydroxide of a ZnAlLDH type, did not provide a [...] Read more.
In this study, spinning disc (SD) technology was successfully applied to a synthetic water to remove its color. The preliminary data performed in a regular mixing system using a potential adsorptive material, i.e., double-layered hydroxide of a ZnAlLDH type, did not provide a significant decrease (no more than 10–15%) in the water color content. Thus, ZnAlLDH (2 g/L) was added to the synthetic water containing 50 mg/L Rosso Remazol RB dye that was subsequently fed onto the spinning disc. The SD efficiency was investigated at four different water-supplying flow rates (5.76, 6.00, 7.44 and 8.16 L/h) and four different disc rotational speeds (100, 250, 500 and 800 rpm). The best color removals of 44.39%, 41.14% and 42.70% were obtained at 6 L/h and 250 rpm, 6 L/h and 500 rpm and 5.76 L/min and 800 rpm, respectively, in only a 50 min working time period. In addition, for a relatively low color concentration in water (~30 mg/L dye) and at the lowest electric power consumption, Fenton oxidation was performed in the SD setup for a more advanced color removal of 62.54% within a 50 min time period. Furthermore, two other materials, titanium and aluminium oxides, underwent similar investigations in the SDR setup, and the obtained results were comparatively discussed. The FTIR spectra of each solid material before and after the SD technology application were used to appreciate the dye-retention performance of each material used. The obtained results indicated that the spinning disc technology correlated with the tested materials could significantly improve the water color (over 40% color reduction), this level of color reduction being higher than that obtained following a coagulation–flocculation test (20–28% color reduction), an ion exchange (25–30% color removal) or a sand filtration step (15–20%) applied to the same dye-based water sample. A further increase in color removal could be achieved by using an additional oxidative step (more than 65% color reduction). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pollution Control Chemistry II)
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16 pages, 4473 KiB  
Article
Voltammetric Study for the Determination of Diclofenac in Aqueous Solutions Using Electro-Activated Carbon Electrodes
by Silvia Berto, Enrico Cagno, Enrico Prenesti, Giulia Aragona, Stefano Bertinetti, Agnese Giacomino, Paolo Inaudi, Mery Malandrino, Emanuele Terranova and Ornella Abollino
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(16), 7983; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12167983 - 09 Aug 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1215
Abstract
Diclofenac (DCF) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug to treat pain and inflammatory diseases. The high consumption of the drug leads to a significant change in the ecosystem. With the aim of optimizing a fast screening analysis for DCF detection on many samples with [...] Read more.
Diclofenac (DCF) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug to treat pain and inflammatory diseases. The high consumption of the drug leads to a significant change in the ecosystem. With the aim of optimizing a fast screening analysis for DCF detection on many samples with a sensitive and cheap procedure, we considered electrochemical methods using carbon-based electrodes as sensors. The electrochemical behavior of the DCF was studied on glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) and on screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs) from two different suppliers after an anodic activation. The surface of the SPCEs was analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (EDS). On all the activated electrodes, the voltammetric procedure (Differential Pulse Voltammetry) for the determination of DCF was optimized by the Experimental Design method, and the linearity range of the response, as well as the calibration and limit parameters (limits of detection—LoD; limit of quantification—LoQ), were defined. Analyses on SPCEs were performed both by immersing the electrode in the solution and by deposing a drop of solution on the electrode. DCF signals are stabilized by the polishing process and enhanced by the anodic activation and acid pH. The electrochemical response of DCF is not reversible, and its by-products tend to be adsorbed on the surfaces, particularly on GCE. The lowest limit parameters were obtained using the GCE (LoD = 1.6 µg L−1) and the SPCE, having the smallest surface, immersed in solution (LoD = 7 µg L−1). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pollution Control Chemistry II)
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15 pages, 1674 KiB  
Article
Empirical Modeling and Optimization by Active Central Composite Rotatable Design: Brilliant Red HE-3B Dye Biosorption onto Residual Yeast Biomass-Based Biosorbents
by Carmen Zaharia and Daniela Suteu
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(13), 6377; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12136377 - 23 Jun 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1011
Abstract
(1) Introduction: Natural polymers can be successfully used as a matrix to immobilize residual yeast-based biomass in a form that is easy to handle and can be used as biosorbent capable of removing persistent polluting species from different aqueous systems such as reactive [...] Read more.
(1) Introduction: Natural polymers can be successfully used as a matrix to immobilize residual yeast-based biomass in a form that is easy to handle and can be used as biosorbent capable of removing persistent polluting species from different aqueous systems such as reactive azo dyes. (2) Experimental: Two types of new biosorbents were prepared based on residual Saccharomyces pastorianus yeast biomass immobilized in sodium alginate (using two different practice techniques) and studied in the biosorption process of reactive Brilliant Red HE-3B dye using certain experimental planning matrices according to the active central composite rotatable design of 23 order. The experimental data obtained under certain selected working conditions were processed considering the influence of three independent variables (biosorbent concentration—X1, initial dye concentration—X2 and biosorption time—X3) onto the dependent variable (Y = f(X1,X2,X3)) expressing the performance of reactive dye biosorption onto the new prepared biosorbents (i.e., dye removal degree, %). (3) Results: Two mathematical models were proposed for each prepared biosorbent. The maximum dye removal was 52.878% (Y1) when 18 g/L biosorbent 1 (micro-encapsulated form) was applied in 70 mg/L dye-containing solution for at least 8 h, and 75.338% (Y2) for 22.109 g/L biosorbent 2 (immobilized form) in 48.49 mg/L dye-containing solution for at least 8.799 h. (4) Discussion: The optimal values achieved for the two tested biosorbents were compared, and we investigated the possibility of using this residual biomass as a biosorbent for the reactive dye removal, supported by the experimental results with the recommended variation domains of each influencing variable. The results are sufficient to permit performing dye removal higher than 50% (biosorbent 1) or 70% (biosorbent 2), working with more than 18–22 g/L biosorbent after at least 8 h (as an exchange at work). (5) Conclusions: The proposed models are in good agreement with the experimental data and permit the prediction of dye biosorption behavior onto the experimental variation domain of each independent variable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pollution Control Chemistry II)
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