Wearables and Smartphone Applications in Sports

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2022) | Viewed by 6530

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
University Institute for Computing Research, Physical Education and Sports, Faculty of Education, University of Alicante, 03013 Alicante, Spain
Interests: sport; biomechanics; instrumentation; audio; video; performance; technology; rowing
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Technological innovation has enabled researchers and practitioners to undertake physical performance assessment through accurate monitoring of physiological and biomechanical measurements. In laboratory environments, measurement conditions can be easily controlled to produce accurate results of performance metrics but with low ecological validity. Field testing allows performance assessment in conditions familiar to the athlete and with less time and space constraints, compared to laboratory testing. Portable devices such as smartphones and tablets are powerful, small, and cost-effective technology that can collect data through downloadable applications (apps) to quantify performance in training and competition. Current smartphone and tablet technology includes high-speed, high-resolution video recording, advanced computing power, inertial, temperature, magnetic, and proximity sensors, as well as global positioning receivers. Wearable devices are external sensors providing continuous and non-invasive monitoring of biosignals indicative of physical, physiological, and biochemical markers. As with smartphones and tablets, these devices have evolved to combine data collection and analysis embedded in wearable units with appropriate materials and software interfaces.

The aim of this Special Issue is to focus on describing the state of the art on the development, application, and use of portable and wearable devices, either working alone or combined, for the assessment of sports fundamentals of athletes in training and competition.

Prospective authors are cordially invited to submit their original research and review papers that address but are not restricted to the following topics:

  • Application developments
  • Validation studies
  • Heart rate monitors
  • Global navigation satellite system applications
  • Portable electromyography
  • Accelerometers
  • Pedometers
  • Biometric data via machine learning
  • G-force measurement
  • RFID and other technologies to quantify movement and distance profiles
  • Wristbands
  • Smartwatches
  • Fitness trackers
  • Smart clothing
  • Head-mounted displays
  • Other devices or sensors

Dr. Luca Paolo Ardigo
Dr. Basilio Pueo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • application developments
  • validation studies
  • heart rate monitors
  • global navigation satellite system applications
  • portable electromyography
  • accelerometers
  • pedometers
  • biometric data via machine learning
  • G-force measurement
  • RFID and other technologies to quantify movement and distance profiles
  • wristbands
  • smartwatches
  • fitness trackers
  • smart clothing
  • head-mounted displays
  • other devices or sensors

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

10 pages, 1138 KiB  
Article
Audio Feedback with the Use of a Smartphone in Sailing Training among Windsurfers
by Jacek Tarnas, Magdalena Cyma-Wejchenig, Nina Schaffert and Rafał Stemplewski
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(5), 3357; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13053357 - 6 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1278
Abstract
The open-water training conditions in sailing sports limit the coach’s ability to provide instructions. Auditory feedback provided using a smartphone application in real-time seems to be a promising tool in the training process. The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness [...] Read more.
The open-water training conditions in sailing sports limit the coach’s ability to provide instructions. Auditory feedback provided using a smartphone application in real-time seems to be a promising tool in the training process. The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of a smartphone application created to support tactical decisions via an auditory display. Thirteen successful windsurfers competing in RS:X class took part in the study. The results, collected with the use of a questionnaire, related to the technical and aesthetic aspects of the functions as well as decision-making assistance of the application during upwind sailing races. Most of the competitors positively evaluated application function (54–85%). Real-time information about the deviation from the set course and information about potential tack change due to a changed wind direction were statistically significantly more helpful for less experienced windsurfers (rho = −0.68 and rho = −0.78, respectively) and those with lower sports level (rho = −0.63 and rho = −0.65, respectively). It can be concluded that the use of sound feedback in the conditions of training on-water in sailing has potential, primarily for younger and less experienced competitors. Quantitative evaluations of the sailing performance should be considered in further research on the functionality of the application. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wearables and Smartphone Applications in Sports)
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24 pages, 1028 KiB  
Article
Direct Mobile Coaching as a Paradigm for the Creation of Mobile Feedback Systems
by Martin Dobiasch, Stefan Oppl, Michael Stöckl and Arnold Baca
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(11), 5558; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12115558 - 30 May 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1859
Abstract
In sports feedback systems, digital systems perform tasks such as capturing, analysing and representing data. These systems not only aim to provide athletes and coaches with insights into performances but also help athletes learn new tasks and control movements, for example, to prevent [...] Read more.
In sports feedback systems, digital systems perform tasks such as capturing, analysing and representing data. These systems not only aim to provide athletes and coaches with insights into performances but also help athletes learn new tasks and control movements, for example, to prevent injuries. However, designing mobile feedback systems requires a high level of expertise from researchers and practitioners in many areas. As a solution to this problem, we present Direct Mobile Coaching (DMC) as a design paradigm and model for mobile feedback systems. Besides components for feedback provisioning, the model consists of components for data recording, storage and management. For the evaluation of the model, its features are compared against state-of-the-art frameworks. Furthermore, the capabilities are benchmarked using a review of the literature. We conclude that DMC is capable of modelling all 39 identified systems while other identified frameworks (MobileCoach, Garmin Connect IQ SDK, RADAR) could (at best) only model parts of them. The presented design paradigm/model is applicable for a wide range of mobile feedback systems and equips researchers and practitioners with a valuable tool. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wearables and Smartphone Applications in Sports)
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16 pages, 2980 KiB  
Article
Wearable Inertial Measurement Unit to Measure External Load: A Full-Season Study in Professional Soccer Players
by Hadi Nobari, Luiz G. Gonçalves, Rodrigo Aquino, Filipe Manuel Clemente, Manuchehr Rezaei, Jorge Carlos-Vivas, Jorge Pérez-Gómez, Basilio Pueo and Luca Paolo Ardigò
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(3), 1140; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12031140 - 21 Jan 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2060
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe weekly acute workload (wAW), chronic workload (wCW), acute: chronic workload ratio (wACWR), training monotony (wTM), and training strain (wTS) variations over a full season across playing positions. Twenty-one professional soccer players were daily monitored during [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to describe weekly acute workload (wAW), chronic workload (wCW), acute: chronic workload ratio (wACWR), training monotony (wTM), and training strain (wTS) variations over a full season across playing positions. Twenty-one professional soccer players were daily monitored during 48 consecutive weeks. Total distance, sprint total distance (STD), high-speed running distance (HSRd), maximum speed, number of the repeated sprints, and body load (BL) were obtained during training and matches using a Wearable Inertial Measurement Unit. The wAW was determined for each external load measure. The wCW, wACWR, and wTM were calculated based on BL metric. Higher values of weekly STD were observed in lateral defenders/wingers (LDW) compared to central defenders/forwards (CDF) (p = 0.009; ES = Large) and midfielders (MDF) (p = 0.034; ES = Large). Additionally, weekly HSRd was higher in LDW vs. CDF (p = 0.016; ES = Large) and MDF (p = 0.011; ES = Large). The CDF presented a lower weekly number of repeated sprints than LDW (p = 0.021; ES = Large). In conclusion, weekly external load metrics were position-dependent over the season. Moreover, LDW a presented greater weekly STD, HSRd, and number of repeated sprints compared to other positions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wearables and Smartphone Applications in Sports)
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