Research Progress on New Aggregates and Materials for Concrete

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Science and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 February 2024 | Viewed by 1782

Special Issue Editors

LADICIM (Laboratory of Materials Science and Engineering), University of Cantabria, E.T.S. de Ingenieros de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Av./Los Castros 44, 39005 Santander, Spain
Interests: eco-concrete; recycled aggregates; sustainable construction materials; mechanical properties; durability
LADICIM (Laboratory of Materials Science and Engineering), University of Cantabria, E.T.S. de Ingenieros de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Av./Los Castros 44, 39005 Santander, Spain
Interests: cementitious materials; concrete technology; recycled aggregates concrete; durability; sustainable concrete
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
LADICIM (Laboratory of Materials Science and Engineering), University of Cantabria, E.T.S. de Ingenieros de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Av./Los Castros 44, 39005 Santander, Spain
Interests: concrete design; finite element; failure analysis; eco-friendly construction materials; recycled aggregates
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We invite contributions for a Special Issue focused on "Research Progress on New Aggregates and Materials for Concrete." Concrete is a fundamental building material with a significant impact on the construction industry. This Special Issue aims to explore recent advancements in the aggregates and materials used in concrete, with a focus on enhancing its performance, sustainability, and durability.

This Special Issue seeks to address the challenges faced by the construction industry, such as the need for innovative construction materials, the efficient utilization of resources, and environmental sustainability. We encourage researchers, academics, and practitioners to present their latest research findings on the following key topics:

  • Novel aggregates and supplementary materials for concrete mix designs.
  • Sustainable and eco-friendly alternatives to traditional aggregates.
  • Advances in concrete technology, including self-healing concrete, high-level performance concrete, and low-carbon concrete.
  • The characterization and performance evaluation of new materials in concrete.
  • The durability and long-term behavior of concrete incorporating new aggregates.
  • Recycling and reusing waste materials as aggregates in concrete production.
  • The impact of new materials on the mechanical, thermal, and acoustic properties of concrete.
  • Life-cycle assessment and environmental impact analysis of concrete with innovative aggregates.
  • Case studies of successful applications and real-world implementations.

We encourage original research articles, reviews, and case studies that contribute to the advancement of knowledge in this area. Authors are encouraged to present practical solutions, potential challenges, and future prospects in the use of new aggregates and materials for concrete.

Dr. Pablo Tamayo
Dr. Carlos Thomas
Dr. Jose A. Sainz-Aja
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • concrete technology
  • new aggregates
  • sustainable materials
  • construction industry
  • durability
  • innovative practices
  • eco-friendly alternatives
  • performance evaluation
  • recycling materials

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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18 pages, 4947 KiB  
Article
Hydration, Reactivity and Durability Performance of Low-Grade Calcined Clay-Silica Fume Hybrid Mortar
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(21), 11906; https://doi.org/10.3390/app132111906 - 31 Oct 2023
Viewed by 769
Abstract
Low-grade calcined clay, due to its low cost, availability and low temperature calcination, has been gaining attention in recent times as a supplementary cementitious material (SCM) in the manufacture of revolutionary building materials to improve the fresh and hardened properties of concrete. Silica [...] Read more.
Low-grade calcined clay, due to its low cost, availability and low temperature calcination, has been gaining attention in recent times as a supplementary cementitious material (SCM) in the manufacture of revolutionary building materials to improve the fresh and hardened properties of concrete. Silica fume, on the other hand, has been used, over the years, to improve the performance of concrete due to its reduced porosity and improved transition zone quality. In spite of the individual contribution of these two pozzolans to the strength and durability of concrete, there is a knowledge gap in the properties of ternary blended mixes utilizing calcined clay and silica fume. In this study, the synergistic effect of calcined clay and silica fume on the fresh and hardened properties of cementitious mortar have been investigated. The two pozzolans were used to partially substitute Portland cement to form a ternary blended composite binder having, at a maximum, a replacement of 30% by weight and a varying content of calcined clay and silica fume. The influence of the binary and ternary blended mixes on hydration, pozzolanic reactivity and the mechanical and durability properties of mortar was studied. From the results, partial replacement of cement with 30% calcined clay and silica fume caused significant reductions in the portlandite content of the two hydrated pastes at all curing ages. Drying shrinkage was found to be less severe in the control mortar than the blended cement mixes. Compared to the blended cement specimens, the control suffered the most weight (13.3%) and strength (10%) losses, as indicated by the sulphate resistance test. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research Progress on New Aggregates and Materials for Concrete)
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Review

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28 pages, 6893 KiB  
Review
Novel Processing Methods of Low-Clinker Multi-Component Cementitious Materials—A Review
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 899; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14020899 - 20 Jan 2024
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Abstract
The wide use of multi-component cement of highly reduced Portland clinker factor is largely impeded by detrimental changes in the rheological properties of concrete mixes, a substantial reduction in the early rate of cement hardening, and sometimes the insufficient strength of mature concrete. [...] Read more.
The wide use of multi-component cement of highly reduced Portland clinker factor is largely impeded by detrimental changes in the rheological properties of concrete mixes, a substantial reduction in the early rate of cement hardening, and sometimes the insufficient strength of mature concrete. Therefore, major changes are needed in traditional concrete-production technologies if low-clinker cement is to gain wider acceptance. This review’s goal is to summarize the impacts of using non-ionizing radiation methods to improve the dispersion of concrete mix constituents, cement setting, and early hardening. The potential impacts of such interactions on the permeability and strength of concrete are also highlighted and investigated. Their intriguing potential for delivering additional energy to cementitious mixtures is analyzed for batch water, solid non-clinker constituents of cement (mainly supplementary cementitious materials), and their mixtures with aggregates. The advantages of adopting these non-traditional methods are found to be highly alluring to the greener preparation techniques used in the construction materials sector. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research Progress on New Aggregates and Materials for Concrete)
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