Bioactive Compounds and Enriched Foods: Technological and Nutritional Aspects

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2024 | Viewed by 396

Special Issue Editors

CREA Research Centre for Food and Nutrition, Via Ardeatina 546, I-00178 Rome, Italy
Interests: bioactive compounds; gluten-free products; cereals; pseudocereals; legumes; food by-products
CREA Research Centre for Food and Nutrition, Via Ardeatina 546, I-00178 Rome, Italy
Interests: cereals and pseudocereals; grains; antioxidants; carotenoids; phenolic compounds; gluten-free; HPLC; health and nutrition; bioactive compounds; fruit and vegetables
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The resonance of bioactive compounds and enriched foods comes from afar, and fundamental and applied research into healthy foods and biologically active food components has been carried out over the last few decades. Nonetheless, there is much to investigate and discover, and further investigations are required to open up new opportunities to expand our knowledge in these areas.

This Special Issue aims to bring together original articles or reviews on the topics below, so as to gain new and solid knowledge of bioactive compounds and enriched foods.

  • The fortification of foods with functional components from traditional and emerging sources (e.g., food by-products, food waste, botanicals, plant extracts);
  • The characterization of emerging enriched foods;
  • Macro- and micro-nutrients as functional components;
  • The effect of (bio)technologies (e.g., thermal and non-thermal treatment, fermentation) on nutritional value and organoleptic properties of functional foods;
  • The role of enriched/fortified foods in food-specific diets and/or diets followed for medical reasons;
  • Probiotic enriched foods;
  • Bioavailability, bioaccessibility, and bioactivity;
  • Mechanisms by which enriched foods/food components can modulate physiological parameters connected with disease prevention;
  • In vitro, cell and animal studies.

Dr. Francesca Melini
Dr. Valentina Melini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • bioactive compounds
  • enriched foods
  • fermented foods
  • probiotics and prebiotics
  • antioxidants
  • bioaccessibility, bioavailability and biological activity
  • human/gut health protection
  • in vitro and in vivo studies
  • effect of thermal/non-thermal treatments
  • food waste recovery

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

11 pages, 4288 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Brewing Time on the Antioxidant Activity of Tea Infusions
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 2014; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14052014 - 29 Feb 2024
Viewed by 234
Abstract
Many studies have found that tea has an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-obesogenic and anti-diabetic effect, mostly associated with the content of anti-oxidant compounds. Polyphenols, being the main secondary metabolites in tea, are often considered the physiological markers determining a tea’s quality. Apart from [...] Read more.
Many studies have found that tea has an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-obesogenic and anti-diabetic effect, mostly associated with the content of anti-oxidant compounds. Polyphenols, being the main secondary metabolites in tea, are often considered the physiological markers determining a tea’s quality. Apart from the tea production process and tea components, brewing conditions can also influence the levels of antioxidants in tea. This study aimed to verify whether the brewing time of various tea types (5, 10 and 15 min) affects the level of extraction of antioxidant compounds into infusions and their antioxidant activity. We examined 11 types of tea: green leaf tea, green tea bags, white tea bags, black tea bags, red tea bags, black leaf tea, yerba mate, raspberry tea bags, butterfly pea flower (Clitoria ternatea) tea, white lychee plum tea and hibiscus flower tea. Total polyphenol (TPC), flavonoids and anthocyanins content, as well as determination of antiradical and antioxidant capacity with DPPH radical and ABTS radical cation, were determined using spectrophotometric assays. Due to the antioxidant activity of tea infusions, the optimum brewing time for green tea (leaf and bags), black tea (leaf and bags), butterfly pea flower tea, white tea, white lychee plum tea, raspberry tea and yerba mate is 15 min. Red tea brewing time should be ten minutes, and for hibiscus flower tea it should be five minutes. The results refer to the brewing temperature recommended by tea manufacturers. Full article
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