Mechanical and Structural Behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Concrete

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Civil Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2024 | Viewed by 440

Special Issue Editor

Polytechnic Institute of Setúbal, Barreiro Technology School, 2839-001 Lavradio, Portugal
Interests: durability of structural materials; rheology of cementitious composites; reliability and numerical analysis; sustainable structures; development of new structural materials; textile reinforced concrete; fiber-reinforced concrete
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The research on fiber-reinforced concrete (FRC) goes back a long way. It started in the early 1900s and addressed several types of fibers, enabling the improvement of fiber distribution within the concrete, the enhancement of fiber geometry, the publication of design guides and the broadening of the fields of application. Nevertheless, researchers and engineers continue to explore new fiber materials and mix design strategies to push the boundaries of what FRC can achieve in terms of strength, durability, and sustainability.

This Special Issue of Applied Sciences welcomes studies focusing on the ongoing efforts in the research of the mechanical and structural performance of FRC. This includes novel applications of FRC beyond traditional construction, such as 3D printing, additive manufacturing, and architectural design possibilities; FRC design and performance prediction based on artificial intelligence; comprehensive cost–benefit analyses to evaluate the economic advantages of using FRC; the environmental impact of FRC, considering factors such as embodied energy, carbon footprint, and sustainable sourcing of fibers; fiber reinforced recycled aggregate concrete; validation of FRC performance in real-world applications; contributions to the refinement and development design codes and standards specific to FRC; studies on the effectiveness of blending different fiber types and combinations in FRC and its optimization; and the development of methods to ensure the most efficient fiber orientation within the concrete matrix, amongst others.

Prof. Dr. Rui Neves
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • fiber-reinforced concrete
  • mechanical properties
  • structural behavior
  • tensile strength
  • flexural strength
  • impact resistance
  • ductility
  • toughness
  • fiber types
  • fiber orientation
  • standards and guidelines
  • sustainability
  • fracture mechanics
  • structural integrity
  • cost–benefit analysis

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

25 pages, 7064 KiB  
Article
Nonlinear Semi-Numeric and Finite Element Analysis of Three-Point Bending Tests of Notched Polymer Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Prisms
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(4), 1604; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14041604 - 17 Feb 2024
Viewed by 262
Abstract
A nonlinear semi-numeric and finite element analysis of three-point bending tests of notched polymer fiber-reinforced concrete prisms was performed. The computational and experimental results were compared in terms of the load-displacement behavior. The vertical midspan displacement and the crack mouth opening displacement results [...] Read more.
A nonlinear semi-numeric and finite element analysis of three-point bending tests of notched polymer fiber-reinforced concrete prisms was performed. The computational and experimental results were compared in terms of the load-displacement behavior. The vertical midspan displacement and the crack mouth opening displacement results were considered. The nonlinear semi-numeric computational procedure involved the moment-curvature relation, calculated by considering the constitutive material law from the fib Model Code for Concrete Structures 2010, and considered a plastic hinge mechanism to simulate the cracked region behavior. Two sets of tensile mechanical properties were considered for the constitutive material law: back-calculated (by an inverse analysis) tensile strength properties from the experimental results, and tensile strength properties calculated by simplified expressions from the fib Model Code for Concrete Structures 2010. Other mechanical properties were determined by additional compressive tests and standard relations for the dependency of various mechanical properties on the concrete compressive strength. The nonlinear finite element analysis incorporated the Menetrey-Willam material model to simulate the fiber-reinforced concrete behavior. The nonlinear semi-numeric analysis load-displacement results based on the back-calculated tensile strength properties relatively accurately matched with the experimental results, whereas the nonlinear semi-numeric analysis load-displacement results based on tensile strength properties calculated by simplified expressions from the fib Model Code for Concrete Structures 2010 and the nonlinear finite element analysis load-displacement results showed certain shortcomings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mechanical and Structural Behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Concrete)
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