Recent Advances in the Research of CO2-Concrete Interaction

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Civil Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2022) | Viewed by 2458

Special Issue Editor

Polytechnic Institute of Setúbal, Barreiro Technology School, 2839-001 Lavradio, Portugal
Interests: durability of structural materials; rheology of cementitious composites; reliability and numerical analysis; sustainable structures; development of new structural materials; textile reinforced concrete; fiber-reinforced concrete
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Concrete carbonation is a research topic that has existed for a very long time, but which is still receiving plenty of attention. The first investigation on concrete carbonation dates from the first decade of the twentieth century, and a lot has been achieved in the field so far. Despite all the progress reached concerning the durability of reinforced concrete structures, though, which is the subject to which most research efforts have been devoted, there are still some gaps to bridge, such as probabilistic service life design and life cycle analysis. Meanwhile, cement-based concrete has gained a reputation as a pollutant material. On the other hand, part of the research focus has shifted to studying concrete as a CO2-sequestrating material. Still within the frame of environmental concerns, low-carbon binders and even cement-free concrete have been tried out. All this has opened up new fields in concrete carbonation research. This Special Issue of Applied Sciences constitutes a way to disseminate results and findings from reviews, original studies, and experimental programs addressing probabilistic service life design and life cycle assessment of concrete, encompassing carbonation, as well as on the ability of concrete for CO2 sequestration and on carbonation of concrete with unconventional constituents, in particular, with alternative or “new-generation” binders.

Prof. Rui Neves
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • concrete carbonation
  • alkali-activated binders
  • geopolymer concrete
  • CO2 sequestration
  • recycled aggregate concrete
  • service life design
  • life cycle analysis
  • low binder concrete

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

13 pages, 5180 KiB  
Article
Assessment of the Rheological and Mechanical Properties of Geopolymer Concrete Comprising Fly Ash and Fluid Catalytic Cracking Residue as Aluminosilicate Precursor
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(7), 3032; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11073032 - 29 Mar 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1938
Abstract
The use of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) by-products as aluminosilicate precursors in geopolymer binders has attracted significant interest from researchers in recent years owing to their high alumina and silica contents. Introduced in this study is the use of geopolymer concrete comprising FCC [...] Read more.
The use of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) by-products as aluminosilicate precursors in geopolymer binders has attracted significant interest from researchers in recent years owing to their high alumina and silica contents. Introduced in this study is the use of geopolymer concrete comprising FCC residue combined with fly ash as the requisite source of aluminosilicate. Fly ash was replaced with various FCC residue contents ranging from 0–100% by mass of binder. Results from standard testing methods showed that geopolymer concrete rheological properties such as yield stress and plastic viscosity as well as mechanical properties including compressive strength, flexural strength, and elastic modulus were affected significantly by the FCC residue content. With alkali liquid to geopolymer solid ratios (AL:GS) of 0.4 and 0.5, a reduction in compressive and flexural strength was observed in the case of geopolymer concrete with increasing FCC residue content. On the contrary, geopolymer concrete with increasing FCC residue content exhibited improved strength with an AL:GS ratio of 0.65. Relationships enabling estimation of geopolymer elastic modulus based on compressive strength were investigated. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns revealed that the final product from the geopolymerization process consisting of FCC residue was similar to fly ash-based geopolymer concrete. These observations highlight the potential of FCC residue as an aluminosilicate source for geopolymer products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in the Research of CO2-Concrete Interaction)
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